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RYN MAWR 
ALUMNAE 



QUARTERLY 



Vol. XIII 



APRIL, 1919 



No. 1 




Published by the Alumnae Association 

of 
Bryn Mawr College 



THE BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE 
QUARTERLY 

Editor-in-Chief 

Isabel Foster, '15 

Waterbury, Connecticut 

Advertising Manager 

Elizabeth Brakely, '16 

Freehold, N. J. 

TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Annual Report of Alumnae Association 1 

Minutes of Annual Meeting 1 

Report of Directors of College 7 

Report of Treasurer of Association 18 

Report of Service Corps Committee 26 

By-Laws 35 

War Work 39 

Bryn Mawr in South China 41 

Two Conventions in St. Louis 42 

News from the Campus 44 

News from the Clubs 47 

News from the Classes 48 

Bryn Mawr Authors and Their Books 55 

Contributions to the Quarterly, books for review, and subscriptions should be sent to 
the Editor-in-Chief, Isabel Foster, The Republican, Waterbury, Conn. Cheques should be 
drawn payable to Bertha S. Ehlers, 123 Waverly Place, New York City. The Quarterly 
is published in January, April, July, and November of each year. The price of subscrip- 
tion is one dollar a year, and single copies are sold for twenty-five cents each. Any failure 
to receive numbers of the Quarterly should be reported promptly to the Editor. Changes 
of address should be reported to the Editor not later than the first day of each month 
of issue. News items may be sent to the Editors. 

The address of the secretary of the Alumnae Association has been changed. It is now, 
Miss Katherine McCollin, 2213 St. James Place, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Copyright, ioiq, by the Alumnae Association of Bryn Mawr College 



THE BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE 
QUARTERLY 



VOLUME XIII 



APRIL, 1919 



No. 1 



TWENTY-SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE ALUMNAE 
ASSOCIATION OF BRYN MAWR COLLEGE, 1918-1919 



OFFICERS AND COMMITTEES 
Officers, 1918-1920 

President, Louise Congdon Francis (Mrs. 
Richard S. Francis), '00, Bryn Mawr. 
Penna. 

Vice-President, Johanna Kroeber Mosen- 
thal (Mrs. Herman O. Mosenthal), '00, 
320 Central Park West, New York City, New 
York. 

Recording Secretary, Hilda W. Smith, '10, 
West Park, New York. 

Corresponding Secretary, Katharine W. 
McCollin, '15, 2213 St. James Place, Phila- 
delphia, Pa. 

Treasurer, Bertha S. Ehlers, '09, 123 
Waverly Place, New York City, New York. 

members of the academic committee 

Frances Browne, '09, Chairman. . .1918-1922 

Esther Lowenthal, '05 1918-1922 

Dorothy Wolff Douglas, '03 1919-1923 

Janet Howell Clark, '06 1919-1923 

Helen Sandison, '06 1919-1923 

Mary Breed, '92 1919-1921 

Marion Crane Carrol, '12 1919-1920 

Louise Congdon Francis ex officio 

Eleanor Fleisher Reisman, '03, to serve for 

Elizabeth Sergeant until her return from 

France. 



conference committee 
Gertrude B. Barrows, Chairman. .1919-1920 

Mrs. Tenney Frank 1919-1920 

Alice Patterson 1919-1920 

Mary Pierce 1919-1920 

loan fund committee 

Martha G. Thomas 1916-1921 

Mary C. Smith 1918-1920 

Doris Earle 1917-1922 

Alice Patterson 1919-1924 

Elizabeth Maguire 1918-1923 

committee on athletics 

Maude Dessau, Chairman 1915-1920 

Mary G. Branson 1918-1921 

Alice Hawkins 1918-1922 

Louise Marshall Mallery 1919-1924 

Marion Kirk 1919-1923 

james e. rhoads scholarships committee 

Lucy Martin Donnelly 1919-1922 

Marion Paris Smith, Chairman 1917-1920 

Emily Gifford Noyes 1919-1921 

Anne Hampton Todd 1917-1920 

nominating committee 

Cornelia Halsey Kellogg 1919-1923 

Marion Edwards Park 1917-1921 

Elizabeth Lewis Otey 1917-1921 

Alice Hearne 1917-1921 

Josephine Niles McClellan 1917-1921 

Antoinette Cannon 1919-1923 



MINUTES OF ANNUAL MEETING 



Minutes of the Annual Meeting held in Tay- 
lor Hall, February 1, read as follows: 

The reading of the minutes was omitted. 

The President read the report of the Board 
of Directors, which was accepted. 

It was moved that a vote of thanks be given 
to President Thomas for the new alumnae 



room, which she has furnished for the associa- 
tion on the third floor of Taylor. Carried. 

The President read the list of members of the 
association who had died during the year. A 
rising vote of sympathy was taken. It was re- 
ported that Emeline Gowen, 1890, had died two 
days ago, and her name was added to the list. 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[April 



The Treasurer read her report which was 
accepted, with the provision that it should be 
audited in March, when the auditors will be 
free to do it. 

Dr. Dorothy Child, '10, was granted five min- 
utes by the chair to address the meeting, in 
behalf of a proposed endowment of a Bryn 
Mawr scholarship at the Women's Medical 
School. It has been suggested that this schol- 
arship be endowed in honor of Dr. Martha 
Tracy, '98, who is Dean of the Medical College. 
Dr. Child pointed out the great need of a 
permanent scholarship to meet the demand for 
more women doctors, and urged the members of 
the association to contribute to this fund. 

The report of the academic committee was 
read and accepted. 

The report of the conference committee was 
read and accepted. 

Katherine McCollin, '15, moved a vote of 
thanks to Frances Brown, '09, for her services 
as chairman of the academic committee for this 
meeting. Carried. 

It was moved and seconded that the reports 
of the loan fund, athletic, and alumnae supper 
committees be omitted. Carried. 

The report of the James E. Rhoads scholar- 
ships committee was read and accepted. 

Louise Watson, '12, gave a brief report of the 
finance committee, which was accepted. A full 
report was circulated in print. 

Elizabeth Kirkbride, '96, reported for the 
alumnae directors of the college. The report 
was accepted. 

The report of the New York Branch was read 
and accepted. 

Laura Branson, '05, moved that the other 
reports of local branches be omitted. The 
motion was not passed. 

The reports of the Philadelphia and Boston 
Branches were read and accepted. 

The reports of the Baltimore and the Pitts- 
burgh Clubs were read and accepted. 

Isabel Foster, '15, read the report of the 
Quarterly which was accepted. 

The report of the Carola Woerishoffer Me- 
morial Committee was read and accepted. 

It was moved and seconded that the reading 
of the report of the Patriotic Farm be omitted, 
as it was printed in the College News. Carried. 

The report of the joint administrative com- 
mittee of the Bryn Mawr Service Corps was 
read and accepted. 

Pauline Goldmark, '96, read a letter from 
Elizabeth Sergeant, '03, offering to edit an ac- 
count of the work of Bryn Mawr alumnae 



abroad as a partial return for the support given 
to her by the Bryn Mawr Service Corps. 

The next business before the meeting was the 
ratification of amendments to the By Laws. 

1. No action was taken on the question of 
increasing the number of the academic com- 
mittee, as the committee had no recommenda- 
tion to make at present. The matter was laid 
on the table. 

2. Article IV. Section 1, 2 and 3 amended 
to read: 

Article IV 



Section 1. The annual dues for each member of the 
Association shall be two Dollars, payable to the Treas- 
urer at the annual meeting. Associate members shall 
pay the same dues as full members of the Association, 
but shall be exempt from all assessments. 

Sec. 2. The dues for each member that enters the 
Association in June shall be one dollar for the part of 
year from June to the following February, payable to 
the Treasurer on graduation from the College. 

Sec. 3. Any member of the Association may become 
a life member of the Association upon payment at any time 
of forty dollars; and upon such payment she shall become 
exempt from all annual dues and assessments. 

Sec. 4. The names of members who fail to pay the 
annual dues for four successive years shall be stricken 
from the membership list. The Board of Directors may 
at its discretion remit the dues of any member sub silentio. 

This amendment, for which a two thirds vote 
was necessary, was passed unanimously. 

The following changes in the deed of gift were 
ratified : 

1. That the Fund be known as the Mary 
Elizabeth Garrett Memorial Endowment Fund. 

2. That the words "at cost value" be in- 
serted, after the words "cash and securities." 

3. That the words "Chairman of the Board 
of Trustees" be changed to read president of 
the board of trustees. 

The next business before the meeting was a 
discussion of the future of the Bryn Mawr Pa- 
triotic Farm. 

Isabel Foster moved that because of the 
change in the food situation, the Patriotic 
Farm be discontinued. 

(As no one was present who could speak 
from the view point of the farm management, 
the motion was withdrawn until Bertha Ehlers, 
'09, or Alice Hawkins, '07, should arrive.) 

Alice Hawkins reported a little later that it 
was impossible to make the farm self-supporting 
so long as unskilled labor was employed. It 
was very difficult to get student help last year, 
and it would be still more difficult this year. 
There is every reason to continue food produc- 



1919] 



Annual Report of Alumnae Association 






tion, which will be carried on under the Wom- 
en's Land Army. Instead of running an inde- 
pendent farm, it would be better to encourage 
students to join the Land Army Units nearest 
their own homes. The College can now buy 
goods in the open market. 

Mary Crawford Dudley, '96, suggested that 
the association might take a sense of the meet- 
ing as to whether it wished to support some 
such organization as the Woman's Land Army, 
and leave it to the board to decide. 

As there was some doubt as to the necessity 
of having the opinion of the undergraduates 
or of the War Council on this matter of discon- 
tinuing the farm, the original motion was with- 
drawn. It was moved and seconded that it be 
recorded as the sense of the meeting that the 
Bryn Mawr Patriotic Farm be discontinued. 
Carried 

Alice Hawkins, '07, reported that the farm 
has equipment which it wishes to sell, and asked 
the alumnae to keep this in mind. 

Service Corps 

The recommendation of Marion Reilly on 
the Service Corps was read: "that a committee 
of three similar to our committee be appointed 
for the year to cooperate in a similar manner 
with the War Council of the college. That this 
committee be empowered to continue the work 
of the Service Corps on lines that may seem to 
promise the most satisfactory service, and 
further that this committee be empowered to 
send a full report of the work of the Service 
Corps to the alumnae and former students with 
an appeal for further support." It was moved that 
this recommendation be accepted. 

Pauline Goldmark suggested that Elizabeth 
Sergeant's offer to edit a report of the work of 
Bryn Mawr women abroad be accepted, as a 
permanent memorial, rather than as an appeal 
for future funds, and also moved that the rec- 
ommendation be amended to omit the word 
"full." This motion was seconded and passed. 
Pauline Goldmark then moved that the Com- 
mittee be empowered to accept Elizabeth 
Sergeant's offer to edit a report of the work of 
Bryn Mawr Alumnae abroad. Carried. 

Discussion of Financial Policy 

Elizabeth Kirkbride outlined the main points 
of the problem resulting from the bequest of 
Mrs. Russell Sage of about $600,000. The 
money may be used for any of the following 
objects: 



1. Toward a pension fund, either as a basis 
for the Carnegie Fund or some other. 

2. To increase the salaries of full professors. 

3. To increase the salaries of associate pro- 
fessors and instructors. 

4. To increase executive salaries. 

There was general discussion in detail of each 
of these possibilities. Eleanor Fleisher Reiss- 
man, '03, outlined the Carnegie Pension plan, 
which has not yet been acted on by the directors 
or by the faculty. 

Lois Farnham Horn moved that the direc- 
tors of the alumnae association confer with the 
directors of the college on the matter of giving 
scholarships to the daughters of professors. 
The motion was seconded, and upon being put 
to vote there was a call for a division. Ayes, 
27; Noes, 21. 

Katharine McCollin moved that Article III, 
Section 1 of the By Laws be amended to read 
"the officers of the Association shall constitute 
an executive board." This amendment will be 
brought up at the next meeting for a vote. 
(The object of such an amendment would be to 
save the present confusion in terms between 
the board of directors of the college and of the 
alumnae association.) 

New Business 

Isabel Foster took up the recommendation 
in the report on the Quarterly and suggested 
that as the problem at present is to get the 
news from Alumnae into the Quarterly it 
might possibly be better to send Alumnae news 
regularly in to the College News, and print other 
things in the Quarterly. Or a business ar- 
rangement might be made with the News, so 
that the Alumnae might take over the mid- 
years and final edition of the News. 

Mary Crawford Dudley moved that the Board 
of Directors consider the question of coopera- 
tion with the College News. Carried. 

Marion Parris Smith, '01, moved that the 
recommendation on the James E. Rhoads 
Scholarships report, "that the matter of in- 
creasing the scholarships be referred to the 
Board of Directors and the Finance Committee, 
with the power to act." The motion was 
passed. 

It was moved and seconded that the meeting 
adjourn. Passed. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Hilda Worthington Smith, 
Recording Secretary. 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[April 



OPEN MEETING HELD JANUARY 31 
IN GYMNASIUM 

Helen Taft, '15, dean of the college, pre- 
sided at the open alumnae meeting held in 
the Gymnasium on January 31, because Marion 
Reilly, '01 chairman of the Service Corps 
Committee was ill. 

Caroline McCornick Slade, ex-'96 (Mrs. 
F. L. Slade) described her work in the per- 
sonnel department of the Y. M. C. A. in New 
York. All the applicants for overseas service 
passed through her office. 

Ellen Kirkpatrick, '99, told of her work with 
the A. E. F., in canteen and platform service. 



Marie Sichel, '00 — (Mrs. Ernest Limburg), 
told of the trials and recompenses of a director 
of Red Cross at a cantonment in this country. 

Margaret Free, '15, described work in the 
department of army personnel in Washington. 

Dr. Dorothy Child, '10, recounted her 
experiences with a pediatric unit working with 
French refugee and orphan children. 

Marion Macintosh, '90, as field secretary 
for Pennsylvania of the Women's Land Army 
told the value of the units both in food pro- 
duction and Americanization of the women 
used to field work in the old country. 



BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION REPORT 



In the interval between meetings of the 
alumnae the work of the Association is carried 
on by standing and special committees. The 
standing committees are academic, conference, 
Loan Fund, James E. Rhoads, finance, commit- 
tee on athletics. Owing to the war there have 
been many changes this year in the personnel 
of these committees and the board of directors 
has felt as never before that its function is to 
make nominations and appointments. There 
have been two appointments to the board of 
directors itself, Margaret Bontecou, '09, resigned 
as corresponding secretary, immediately upon 
her election, to go to France as a canteen worker. 
Her place was filled by Katharine McCollin,'15. 
This fall Catharine Delano Grant, '11, resigned 
as vice president and Johanna Kroeber Mo- 
senthal, '00, was appointed by the board. 

With great regret the board was obliged to 
accept, this fall, the resignation from the aca- 
demic committee of Pauline Goldmark, '96, 
Frances Fincke Hand, '97, Ellen Ellis, '01, 
Elizabeth Sergeant, '03 and Helen Emerson, 
'11. This reduced the committee to two mem- 
bers and it seemed for a time as if it would be 
necessary to omit altogether the meetings of 
the committee for this year. The board of 
directors felt that in view of the many problems 
before the world and the college to-day it would 
be a mistake to lose an opportunity for a con- 
ference between the officers and faculty of the 
college and the alumnae association. Therefore 
the board of directors appointed as substitutes 
for this meeting, Grace Jones, '00, Eleanor 
Fleischer Riesman, '03, Helen Sandison, '06, 
Janet Howell Clark, '10, and Dorothy Wolff 
Douglas, '12. In spite of their short time for 
preparation the committee had many interest- 



ing and profitable discussions with members 
of the faculty and with the President and Dean 
of the college. 

All of the standing committees of the associa- 
tion have given willing and valuable service 
throughout the year. The finance committee 
has been particularly active and has started on 
a new policy of publicity from which we hope 
great things. An effort is being made just now 
to make the conference committee mean more 
both to the undergraduates and to the alumnae. 
It is proposed to invite to meetings of the con- 
ference committee members of the board of 
directors and of the academic committee. 

The most important special committees this 
year are the two war committees, the farm 
committee and the service corps. Both have 
done yeoman service and deserve the sincere 
gratitude of the alumnae association. 

Last December the term expired of one of 
the alumnae directors of the college. For six 
years Elizabeth Fields Bancroft has given 
herself unsparingly to all the problems of Bryn 
Mawr and the board of directors desires here 
to express the appreciation of the alumnae 
association. Frances Fincke Hand, '97, has 
been elected alumnae director of the college to 
fill this vacancy. 

You will remember that a year ago we were 
ready to hand over to the college $100,000, 
the Mary Elizabeth Garrett Memorial Fund. 
This fund is still in our hands as we have been 
requested by the directors of the college to hold 
it until such time as they may ask for it. We 
are, however, paying over to the college the 
interest to the extent of $4000. The college 
is spending this in accordance with the terms 
of the deed of gift. By means of this payment, 



1919] 



Annual Report of Alumnae Association 



the college has been able to raise the salaries of 
all the associate professors to $2,500, and a bonus 
of $89 has been paid this year to each of the 
full professors. 

As the alumnae association grows, we feel, 
more and more the need of expansion and new 
methods. The local clubs and branches have 
now become the special province of the vice 
president, who would welcome any suggestions 
for more efficient local organization. We 
propose to send at least once a year to each 
club and branch someone who is thoroughly 
in touch with college affairs. As a beginning, 
Louise Watson, '12, went last week as a delegate 
from the board of directors to the New York 
Branch. Next week she will go to New Haven 
to the A. C. A. meeting. This week the alumnae 
have published a special number of The Col- 
lege News, which will be sent to all alumnae 
and former students. 

At the last annual meeting we appropriated 
$100 and appointed a committee to get to- 
gether a collection of slides of the College, to 
be used in different parts of the country. These 
slides, which were shown for the first time last 
night in the gymnasium, will be shown to local 
branches and to schools. By such publicity 
work we hope to attract to Bryn Mawr, not 
more students, but the best possible type of 
student. We hope also to keep the interest 
of our scattered members. 

Everything which we do in the nature of 
expansion costs money and we are more and 
more hampered by our small income. The 
branches need help in defraying their expenses, 
for postage, printing, etc. The Board of Di- 
rectors proposes to remit to each branch 5 per 
cent of the dues paid by its members to the 
association. To do this it is necessary to de- 
fine carefully the geographical limits of the 
branches. Here particularly the board of di- 
rectors would welcome suggestions. 

A motion will come before this meeting that 
the dues of the association be raised from $1.50 
to $2.00. The board of directors wishes to 
state that owing to increased expenses it will 
not be able, without this increase, to meet its 
present obligations, much less to expand. 

The Quarterly has had a very hard year, 
but has weathered all storms and has now 
started, we believe, on a new voyage of success 
and usefulness. Elva Lee, '93, who has ably 



edited the Quarterly for six years, has been 
obliged to resign because of serious illness and 
Isabel Foster, '15, is now editor. Owing to 
the necessity of changing editors and to the 
war conditions in the printer's office, there have 
been many delays in bringing out the Quar- 
terly. The January issue, however, is out 
on time and we wish to congratulate the new 
editor and to wish her every success for the 
future. 

The Quarterly needs a business manager 
and we believe that the right person can put 
the Quarterly more nearly on a paying basis. 
Have we not some public spirited alumna who 
will volunteer for this office? 

Since we met last year the Alumnae Room 
has been moved from the basement of the li- 
brary to the third floor of Taylor. We believe 
that we should have a large room on the first 
floor of Taylor, but neverthless we feel that the 
change is an improvement. The new room 
has been fitted out very attractively by Presi- 
dent Thomas and we hope that the alumnae 
present will take this opportunity to see the 
home of the alumnae association in the interim 
of its meetings. 

During the year the following members of 
the Alumnae Association have died: 

Emily Niernsee Atkinson ex-1916 

Mary Estella Dolores Biedenbach . . 1908 

Dorothea Cole 1910 

Adelaide Rebecca Evans (Mrs. 

Clarence Perkins) ex-1906 

Louise Ottilie Heike (Mrs. William 

Cavan Woolsey) ex-1903 

Helen Elisabeth Hurd (Mrs. Gilbert 

Ames Bliss) ex-1910 

Ella Beasten Lewis ex-1905 

Jean Baker Martin (Mrs. Melroy 

Wood Easton) ex-1906 

Frances Ross Poley 1913 

Harriet Robbins 1893 

Marguerita Shipley ex-1910 

Louise Tunstall Smith 1918 

Katharine Trowbridge (Mrs. George 

Perkins) ex-1916 

Emaline Gowen 1890 

I will ask you to express your sympathy by a 
silent rising vote. 

Louise Congdon Francis, 

President. 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[April 



ALUMNAE AT ANNUAL MEETING 



1889. Anna Rhoads Ladd, Harriet Randolph, 
Ella Riegel. 

1890. Katharine M. Shipley. 

1891. Jane B. Haines. 

1893. Grace Elder Saunders, Susan Frances 
Van Kirk, Lucy Lewis. 

1894. Anna Edwina West. 

1895. Mary Jeffers, Marianna Janney, Eliza- 
beth Bent Clark. 

1896. Caroline McCormick Slade, Mary 
Crawford Dudley, Mary Mendinhall Mullin, 
Elizabeth Kirkbride, Rebecca T. M. Darling- 
ton, Clara E. Farr, G. G. King, Anna Scatter- 
good Hoag, Hilda Justice, Tirzah L. Nichols, 
Elizabeth Cadbury Jones, Gertrude Heritage 
Green. 

1897. Grace Albert, Mary L. Fay, Frances 
Finche Hand, Laura Niles, Grace Elder Saun- 
ders, Marion Whitehead Grafton, Anna M. W. 
Pennypacker. 

1898. Helen Williams Woodall, Helen M. 
Zebley, Martha Tracy, Mary Githens Calvert, 
Elizabeth D. W. Tawle, Bertha G. Wood. 

1899. Ellen P. Kilpatrick, Katherine Middle- 
dorf Blackwell. 

1900. Ellen Duncan Fultz, Emily Winterman 
Palmer, Elise Dean Findley, Johanna Kroeber 
Mosenthal, Lois Farnham Horn. 

1901. Florence T. Corbus, Marion Parris 
Smith, Mary Elizabeth Allis, Ethel Cantlin 
Buckley, Corinne Sick el Farley, Grace D. 
Mitchell. 

1902. D. Jean Crawford, Marion Hartshorne 
Emlen, Frances B. Seth, Edith T. Orlady, Anne 
Hampton Todd, Alice Day Jackson. 

1903. Doris Earle, Gertrude Smith, Eleanor 
Fleisher Riesman, Margaret E. Brusstor, 
Virginia T. Stoddard, Agnes Bell Austin, 
Elizabeth M. W. Carey Thomas, Emma C. 
Bechtel. 

1904. Martha Rockwell Moorhouse, Edna A. 
Shearer, Margaret Scott, Anna Knox Buzby 
Palmer, Bertha Brown Lambert, Emma R 
Fries, Emma Thompson. 



1905. Anna C. Clauder, Alberta Warner 
Aiken, Theodora Bates. 

1906. Mary A. Quimby. 

1907. L. B. Windle, Anna A. Gendell, Leila 
Woodruff Stokes, Athalia Crawford, M. I. 
O'Sullivan, Alice Martin Hawkins. 

1908. Myra Elliot Vauclain, Louise Hyman 
Pollat, Margaret S. Duncan, Margaret Cham- 
bers Dill, Olive M. Craig, Helen North Hunter. 

1909. Frances Browne, B. S. Ehlers, Lillian 
Laser Strauss, Emma White Mitchell, Helen 
C. Irey. 

1910. Marion S. Kirk, Pat Murphy Smith. 

1911. Gertrude Gruebel Dannenbaum, Lola 
Seeds MacGannon. 

1912. L. Lucas Tomlinson, Louise Watson, 
Helen Barber Matteson, Christine Hammer, 
Dorothy Wolff Douglas, Elizabeth Pinney 
Hunt, Mary Pierce, Anna Hartshorne Brown, 
Mary Alden Morgan Haupt. 

1913. Elizabeth Yarnall Maguire, Alice Dud- 
ley Patterson, Helen Anderson Wilson Cresson, 
R. Beatrice Miller, Agatha Deming, Grace 
Bartholomew. 

1914. Mary M. P. Allinson, Helen Reed 
Kirk. 

1915. Helen Taft, M. B. Goodhue, Cleora 
Sutch, Margaret L. Free, Anna Haines Brown, 
Isabel F. Smith, K. Sheafer, Laura E. Branson, 
Isabel Foster, Amy MacMaster, Katharine W. 
McCollin. 

1916. Marion Kleps, Ruth E. Lantz, Anna 
C. Lee. 

1917. I. A. Haupt. 

1918. Margaret H. Bacon, Mary K. Stair, 
Ruth Ely Rhoads. 

Ph.D. Mary Hamilton Swindler, Isabel Mad- 
dison. 

Ph.D.s 

Margaret Shove Morriss has been in France 
since October 1917 on leave of absence from 
Mount Holyoke College. She has been director 
of the Y. W. C. A. National Bank for the 
American Nurses in France. 



1919] Annual Report of Alumnae Association 7 

REPORT OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF BRYN MAWR 

COLLEGE 

I. Alumnae Academic Endowment Fund of January 15, 1909 

Principal: 

Cash and securities received January 15, 1909 $100,000.00 

Net additions because of differences between par value and value at which securi- 
ties were taken and sold 1,721.14 

Transferred from income account 2,235.08 

Total par value of fund $103,956 . 22 

Investments: 

Chicago, Rock Island and Pacific Rwy. Co., General Mtge. 4% $3,000.00 

New York Central and Hudson River R. R. Co. 34% 5,000.00 

Chicago, Burlington and Quincy R. R. Co., Illinois Division Mtge. 4% 5,000.00 

Standard Steel Works Co., 1st Mtge. 5% 5,000.00 

Cost of certain improvements on the College Grounds assumed as an investment for this Fund as 

agreed upon with the Alumnae Association. 4|% 25,000.00 

Northern Pacific Railway, General Lien. 3% 3.000 . 00 

Mortgage No. 7, Lombaert Ave., Bryn Mawr, Pa. 4$% 35,000.00 

Southern Pacific Co. Equipment. 4^% 13.000.00 

Pennsylvania General Freight Equipment. 4i% 3,000.00 

Share in Mortgage No. 8, 1415 South Twenty-first St., Philadelphia. 5 T %% 750.00 

Pennsylvania R. R. Co., General Mortgage. A\% 5,000.00 

Bryn Mawr College Fund Association. Second Mortgage. 5% -. 1,000.00 

United States First Liberty Loan, 1932-47. 4J% 200.00 

Uninvested and due from the Trustees 6 . 22 

Total Par Value $103 ,956 . 22 

Income: 

Receipts: 

Balance, Sept. 30, 1917 $1,863.33 

Interest on investments Oct. 1, 1917 to Sept. 30, 1918 4,549.89 $6,413.22 

Expenditures: 

Salary of holder of endowed chair $3,000.00 

Increase in salaries of three full professors who are heads of departments 1,500.00 

Balance 1,913.22 $6,413.22 



Note. — The amount C$3,000) which but for this endowment would have been expended for the salary of the holder 
of the endowed chair was used to increase the salaries of six full professors who are heads of departments. 

II. Alumnae Academic Endowment Fund of June 2, 1910 

Principal: 

Received from Alumnae Association $150,000 . 00 

Net additions because of differences between par value and value at which securi- 
ties were taken and sold 7,038.77 



Total par value of fund $157,038 . 77 

Investments: 

Chesapeake and Ohio Rwy. Co., General Mtge. \\% $25,000.00 

Mortgage No. 1, 12 acres Camden County, N. J. 6% 12,000.00 

New York Central Lines Equipment. 4£% 10,000.00 

Norfolk and Western Railway Divisional First Lien and General Mortgage. 4% 22,000.00 

Chicago, Rock Island and Pacific Rwy. Co., First Refunding Mortgage. 4% 25,000.00 

Reading Company and Philadelphia and Reading Coal and Iron Co., General Mortgage. 4% 15,000.00 

Northern Pacific Rwy. Co., General Lien. 3% 2,000.00 

Baltimore & Ohio Equipment Trust. 4£% 2,000.00 

The Virginian Railway Co., 1st Mortgage. 5% 3,000.00 

New York & Erie R. R. Co. 4% 5,000. 00 

Lehigh Valley R. R. Co., General Consol. Mortgage. 4h% 13,000.00 

Mortgage No. 3 (share), 641/653 Buena Ave., Chicago, 111. 5% 1,100.00 

Chicago Union Station Co., First Mortgage. 4|% 2,000.00 

Wabash R. R. Co., Second Mortgage. 5% 6,000.00 

Union Pacific R. R. Co., First Lien Refunding Morgtage. 4% 4,000.00 

Mortgage No. 4, 809 West Franklin St., Richmond, Va. 5% 3,500. 00 

Mortgage No. 5,4281 Viola St., Philadelphia, Pa. S&% 2,100.00 

United States First Liberty Loan, 1932-47. 4*% 1,100.00 

Wabash R. R. Co. First Mortgage. 5% 3.000.00 

Uninvested and due from the Trustees 238 . 77 



Total Par Value $157,038 . 77 

Income: 

Receipts: 

Interest October 1, 1917 to September 30, 1918 $6,809.55 

Expenditures: 

Academic salaries 6,809 55 



8 The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly [April 

SUMMARY OF INCOME AND EXPENDITURES OF BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 
For the Year October 1, 1917, to Septembr 30, 1918 

INCOME 

A. Securities 

Founder's Endowment $22,711 . 72 

Alumnae Endowment for Professorships 
of 1909 4,500.00 

Alumnae Academic Endowment of 1910... . 6,809.55 

Donor's Endowment 11,178.20 

Justus C. Strawbridge Fund 421.58 

Carola Woerishoffer Endowment 31,115.33 

Undergraduate May Day, 1914, Endow- 
ment Fund 124.45 

Elizabeth S. Shippen Endowment 8,548.75 

Margaret Kingsland Haskell Endowment. . 2,500.00 

Interest $3,697.06 

Less net interest received at 

College 857.95 2,839.11 

$90,748.69 

B. Productive Real Estafte 

Income from Founder's Endow- 
ment invested in Merion, 
Radnor, Denbigh, Pembroke 
East and West $37,123 . 12 

Income from Founder's Endow- 
ment invested in Professors' 
houses 3,541 .51 

$40,664.63 

Income from John D. Rockefel- 
ler Endowment Invested in 

Rockefeller Hall. 9,459.94 

50,124.57 

$140,873.26 

C. Income from Special Funds : 

Unexpended balances of In- 
come, October 1, 1916: 

A. Scholarship Funds $2,360.56 

B. Memorial Funds 2,685.98 

C. Other Funds 1,964.69 

$7,011.23 

Received during the year: 

a. For Memorial Scholar- 

ships (Hopper, Rhoads, 
Brooke Hall, Powers, 
Gillespie, Stevens, An- 
thony, Simpson, Hallo- 
well, Longstreth, Ship- 
pen, Kendrick, Huff, and 
Haskell $5,402.63 

b. Other Memorial Funds 

Ottendorfer Fellowship; 
Ritchie Prize; Rhoads, 
Chamberlain, Wright, 



1919] Annual Report of Alumnae Association 



and Stevens Book 
Funds; Swift Planting 

Fund $869.48 

c. Other Funds (1902 Book 
Fund; Alumnae Endow- 
ment Fund, Smiley- 
Fund, Russell Fund, and 
Class 1919 Fund 200.28 





1917: 


Qv y -±iz..o? 


Unexpended balances October 1 

A. Scholarship Funds 

B. Memorial Funds 


$2,460.20 
4,241.02 


C. Other Funds 




2,074.46 








Students' Fees: 

A. Added to College Income: 

Tuition 

Emergency Fees 


$89,031.04 
19,350.00 


Laboratory Fees 


$4,191.00 
422.20 
293.50 

73.61 
242.65 

47.35 

1,124.12 


Laboratory Supplies 

Geological Excursions 

Graduation Fees 




Changing Rooms Fees 

Music Rooms Fees, net... 

Entrance Examination 

Fees, net 


6.394.43 



$13,483.62 



8,775.68 

$4,707.94 



B. Given to Library for Books: 

Deferred and Condition 

Examination Fees $1,583.00 

Late Registration and 

Course Book Fines 148.00 1,731.00 

$116,506.47 

C. Given to Gymnasium for Apparatus: 

Gymnasium Fines 285 .00 



116,791.47 

Net receipts from sale of books 36.50 

Interest on College Income invested in 1905 Infirmary, 
Trefa, Aelwyd, and prepaid insurance, Comptroller's 

bank balance, etc 857 . 95 

Net receipts from all other sources 1,945.19 

Donations to Current Income: 

Received during 1917-18 $11,842.78 

Unexpended balance of Donations received 
during previous years 2,823.25 






$14,666.03 

Less balance unexpended September 30, 

1918 4,612.35 



10,053.68 



Ruth Emerson Fletcher Bequest: 

Unexpended balance, Sept. 30, 1918 69.25 

Total net receipts from all sources, expended for College running 

expenses, from October 1, 1917, to September 30, 1918 $275,335.24 



10 The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly [April 

EXPENDITURES 
A. ACADEMIC 
Teaching Salaries 

23 Full Professors $63,900.00 

9 Associate Professors $18,100.00 

Donations given for Associate 

Professors' Salaries 1,653.25 

19,753.25 

6 Associate 9,300.00 

3 Lecturers 5,800.00 

11 Instructors 12,496.00 

8 Readers 4,721 .24 

6 Demonstrators 4,050.00 

3 Student Assistants 250.00 

Oral Classes 228.78 



$120,499.27 



Academic Administration Salaries 

(Only the portion of time given 
to Academic work is charged) 

Paid from College Income $19,483.58 

Paid from Donations 699.60 



President, Deans, Secretaries 
and Stenographers (part) 

Comptroller's Office (60%). . . . 

Business Office (60%) 

Student Messengers 

Honorarium Secretary of Fac- 
ulty 

Fellowships and Scholarships 

A. From College Income: 
Fellowships and Graduate 

Scholarships $14,782 . 65 

Foreign Graduate Scholar- 
ships 2,773.62 

Undergraduate Scholarships. 2,900.00 



B. From Income of Special Funds: 
Fellowship and Graduate 

Scholarships $1,250.00 

Undergraduate Scholarships. 3,235.50 



$20,183.18 



20,456.27 



4,485.50 



C. From Donations: 
Fellowships and Graduate 

Scholarships $329.50 

Undergraduate Scholarships. 3,600.00 

3,929.50 

Laboratories 

From College Income: 

Physics $1,188.91 

Chemistry 1,325.87 

Geology 591 . 83 

Biology 1 ,299 . 49 



$14,346.47 

2,742.50 

2,861.39 

32.82 


200.00 



20,183.18 



28,871.27 



1919] Annual Report of Alumnae Association 11 



Experimental Psychology. 

Applied Psychology 

Educational Psychology. . 
Social Economy 



Library 

A. From College Income: 
Maintenance (one-half entire cost) 

Salaries 

New Books Purchased 

Cleaning Tablets in Cloister 



$925.00 
267.32 
248.14 
827.73 


$5,183.01 

7,280.06 

4,587.72 

8.27 



$17,059.06 

B. From Income of Special Funds: 

New Books Purchased 143.69 

C. From Donations: 

New Books Purchased 93.94 



Gymnasium 

From College Income: 

Maintenance of Building $3,837 .32 

Salaries 3,600.00 

Apparatus 124.46 



$7,561.78 
From Donations: 

Salaries 250.00 



Subscription to Wood's Hole Biological Laboratory $100.00 

Subscription to College Entrance Examination Board. . 100.00 

Subscription to Educational Societies 10.00 



$6,674.29 



17,296.69 



7,811.78 

Religious Services 1,775.25 

College Entertaining 254.26 

Subscriptions to Foreign Schools 

American School at Athens $250.00 

American School at Jerusalem 100.00 

American School at Rome 250 .00 

Naples Table Association 50.00 

650.00 



210.00 

Class Room Supplies , 295.35 

Expenditures from Special Funds for Modern Art 93.00 

Expenditures from Special Funds for Helen Ritchie Prize 55.00 

Bureau of Appointments 26.75 

Academic Committee of Alumnae, Travelling Expenses and Entertain- 
ment 142.17 

Expenses of Professors attending meetings of Professional Societies 120.42 

Academic Incidentals 42.60 

Travelling Expenses of Candidates for Appointment 630.35 

Publicity 66.74 

Monographs 275.48 

Academic Administration Expenses 

Office Expenses (60%) $1,456.28 

Telephone (60%) 704 .54 

Printing 2,989.95 

Employees' Compensation Insurance (60%) 358 . 16 

5,508.93 



12 The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly [April 

Maintenance of Academic Buildings $19,675.72 

(Taylor Hall, $7,012.33; Dalton Hall, $6,248.78; one-half 
of Library, $5,183.00; Rent of one-half of Cartref, 
$1,000.00; Advanced Psychological Laboratory $231.61.) 

Maintenance of Grounds and Fire Protection 1 3,786.61 

Legal Advice 50.00 

Academic Expenditures from Donations 1,334.31 

Expenses paid by Treasurer 

Interest $2,784.04 

Printing 44.00 

Auditing 250.00 

Comptroller's Bond 50.00 

Sundries 18 . 60 

Expense as to Amendment of Charter 97.48 

3,244.12 

Permanent Improvements |§ 310.80 

Auto Service $310.80 . (60%) 

Total Academic Expenditures $239,884.34 

B. NON-ACADEMIC ADMINISTRATION 
Salaries 

Paid from College Income $9,932 . 17 

Paid from Donations 466.40 

$10,398.57 

President's, Deans', Secretaries' and Ste- 
nographers' Salaries (part) 6,362.65 

Comptroller's Office (40%) 1,828.34 

Business Office (40%) 1,907.58 

Minutes of Directors 300.00 



$10,398.57 



Expenses 

Office Expenses (40%) 970.85 

Telephone (40%) 469.69 

Employees' Compensation . Insurance 

(60%) 238.78 



1,679.32 

Grounds and Fire Protection ^lO. 18 



1905 Infirmary « 

Salaries $4,630 . 97 

Expenses 5,211 .84 

Interest on amount loaned to complete 

building 875.56 



Receipts: $10,718.50 

Undergraduate Students' Fees. $3,705.00 

Graduate Students' Fees 295 .00 

Hospital Charges to Students, 

etc 3,104.75 

All other income 178.41 



7,283.16 



$3,435.21 



1 Note. — 60% of the cost of Maintenance of Grounds and 40% of Fire Protection is considered as academic, the 
balance as non-academic. 



1919] Annual Report of Alumnae Association 13 

Cost of Students Board During Extension of Easter 

Vacation owing to prevalence of German Measles $165.25 

Loss on operating Yarrow East and West in Excess of 

Receipts from Rooms and Board 2,195.96 

Cost of Operating Llysyfran in Excess of Receipts from 

Rooms 4,232.43 

Sundry Items of Non-academic Incidentals 31.28 

Christmas Donations 219.50 

Taxes for 1918 165.63 

Supply Room — Increases in Supplies on hand 723.23 

Auditing Financial Report for 1917-18 212.50 

Expenditures from Donations 1,626.68 

Permanent Improvements 505.38 

Auto Service, (40%) $207.20, Merion Hall, $298.18. 
Total Non-academic Expenditures $28,301.12 



Total Expenditures for the year : $268,185.46 

Total Net Receipts 275,335.24 



Surplus for Year 2 $7,149.78 

APPENDIX A 

Donations and Emergency Charge 
emergency charge 1917-18 

A special charge of $50.00 per student was established during 1917-18 to provide for the increased cost of wages and 
materials. 

The increase in costs as compared between the years 1916-17 and 1917-18 are stated below on certain specified items: 

1916-17 1917-18 Increase 

Wages of workmen, janitors, etc $40,512.02 $43,155.89 $2,643.87 

Wages of employees in Halls of Residence 30,916.54 34,336.02 3,419. *8 

Provisions— the cost per student was increased $8.25 in 1917-18 for 426 students. 125.00 133.25 3,414.50 

Coal, freight and hauling 14,564.65 23.263.57 8,698.92 

Fire Insurance: 

The increase in cost of labor and material to replace possible losses from 

fire made it necessary to increase the amount of insurance to 3,003.37 3,669.21 665.84 

Compensation Insurance 430.32 596.94 166.62 

The increase in wages caused an increase in the Compensation Insurance 

premiums. ■ 

Total $19,009. 23 

The above represent stated definite increases; but in addition nearly every article purchased during the year was at a 
higher price than the previous year. In order to keep expenses down nothing that was not absolutely necessary was 
purchased. 

DONATIONS FOR SCHOLARSHIPS 

Unexpended balances of donations given in previous years and brought forward from 1916-17. 
Composed of: 

Unexpended 
Expended Balance 

Donation from Mrs. Frank L. Wesson $500.00 $500.00 

Anonymous donation for scholarship 400.00 400 00 

Anonymous per Marion Reilly , special scholarship 300 . 00 300 . 00 

From Mrs. Frederick W. Hallowell for one Robert G. Valentine Memorial 

scholarship 200.00 $200.00 

From Rufus M. Jones for scholarship 100.00 100.00 

From T. Raeburn White for scholarships 200.00 200.00 

$1,700.00 $500.00 $1,200.00 

2 Mote. — This differs from the Treasurer's Summary owing to the fact that the Treasurer has not separated the surplus 
of the Phoebe Anna Thorne Model School (see pages 33 and 34) amounting to $2,468.77. 

The treasurer also includes in the College surplus the unexpended balance of income for the year 1917-18 of the Mar- 
garet Kingsland Haskell Endowment remaining after paying the salary of the Professor of English Composition and the two 
Haskell Scholarships amounting to $2,172.52, which must be applied toward reducing deficits of previous years. Thus the 
surplus of $11,791.07 as shown by the Treasurer's Summary must be reduced by these amounts ($2,468.77 plus $2,172.52 
= $4,641.29) in order to obtain the actual College Surplus, $7,149.78 for the current year. Of this surplus of $7,149.78 
the unexpended balance of appropriations for 1917-18 that is voted back for expenditures in 1918-19 is $5,192.93. 



14 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[April 



Received during 1917—18: 
Scholarships. 

From Alumnae Association of Girls High and Normal Schools, one schol- 
arship 

From the Board of Education of the City of Philadelphia, six scholarships 

From Estate of Charles E. Ellis, three scholarships of $200.00 each 

From Mrs. Frederick W. Hallowell for Robert G. Valentine Memorial 
scholarship. 1918-19 

From the family of the late Charles S. Hinchman for the Charles S. Hinch- 
man Memorial scholarship for 1917-18 

From Margaret C. Timpson for special scholarship 

From Albert Strauss for special scholarship 

From Joseph C. Hoppin for special scholarship 

From Nancy J. Offutt for special scholarship 

From Mrs. J. Campbell Harris for one Thos. H. Powers Memorial schol- 
arship 

From Mrs. Thomas Scattergood, special scholarship 

Bryn Mawr School scholarships 

Chicago Bryn Mawr Llub 

Pittsburgh Bryn Mawr Club • 

Anonymous per Hilda Smith, special scholarship 

Anonymous per Dean Taft, special scholarship 

Special Anonymous Scholarship for Helen M. Harris 



OTHER DONATIONS 







Unexpended 




Expended 


Balance 


$100.00 


% 100. 00 




600.00 


600.00 




600.00 


600.00 




200.00 




$200.00 


500.00 




500.00 


100.00 


100.00 




100.00 


100.00 




25.00 




25.00 


20.00 




20.00 


200.00 


200.00 




200.00 


200.00 




700.00 


700.00 




100.00 


100.00 




200.00 


200.00 




200.00 




200.00 


500.00 




500.00 


129.50 


129.50 




$4,474.50 


$3,029.50 


$1,445.00 


$6,174.50 


$3,529.50 


$2,645.00 



[These donations represent only cash donations received at the college office. All other gifts may be found enumer- 
ated under " gifts" in the President's Report for 1917-18.] 

Unexpended balances of donations given in previous years and amounts expended of same during 1917-1918. 

Balance 
From Justus C. Strawbridge for lantern for service door of Rockefeller 

Hall S4.00 

From Elma Loines, Class of 1905, for Physical Laboratory Apparatus 18 . 75 

Balance of Donation from Dean Reilly for equipment Mathematical 

Department 74 . 20 

From Cynthia M. Wesson, for gymnastic apparatus 365 .00 

Balance of Mary Elizabeth Garrett donation — books for the President's 

office 5.33 

From Class 1904 for books 205 . 15 

From several Students for Screens for Infirmary 13 . 25 

From Undergraduate Association for expenses of next May Day 15.25 

From Grace Albert for Books 5 .00 

From Watson B. Dickerman for purchase of Gazette and Beaux Arts 100.00 

From Mary E. Converse for Art Department 2 .83 

Total $808.76 

DONATIONS RECEIVED 1917-18 

From Julia Lathrop for Lecture expenses $9 . 60 

From Clement D. Haughton for special salaries, 1918-19 500.00 

From Marion Reilly for Art Department _ 20.00 

From President Thomas, special gift for War Council 185 . 43 



$715.03 



Expended 


Unexpended 
Balance 


$0.86 


$3.14 
18.75 




74.20 
365.00 


5.20 
60.80 
13.25 

5.00 

55.69 

2.83 


.13 
144.35 

15.25 

44.31 


$143.63 


$665.13 


Expended 


Unexpended 
Balance 


$9.60 

17.88 
185.43 


$500.00 
2.12 


$212.91 


$502.12 



PRESIDENT'S GIFT OF $5,000.00 FOR 1917-18 

Unexpended balance of 1916-17 gift $314.49 

Gift for 1917-18 5,000.00 



A pprc-Prialion 

Balance of cost of enlarging Deanery Garage $188 . 47 

New fountain in Deanery Garden 99.55 

Special salaries paid 1,416.00 

Emergency fees paid 400 . 00 

Expenses of Appointment Bureau 25.08 

Expenses of Lectures 588 .81 

New Curtains for Taylor Hall 187 .23 

Prizes, general information test 1 75 . 00 

Infirmary bills paid for poor students 290 . 56 

Lantern Slides, Archeology Department 50 . 00 

For Gazette des Beaux Arts, Art Department 168 . 41 

Books for Library for Professor Gray 50 . 00 

Maps for Professor Wheeler 70 . 00 

Art Department for Professor King 50 . 00 

Laboratory for Infirmary 300 . 00 

Frames for Library Portrait 235 . 00 

Balance of cost framing Portrait of Mary Elizabeth Garrett 7 . 20 

Window seat for Rockefeller Hall 34.28 

Window seat for Professor King's office 13 . 09 

Scholarship for Phoebe Anna Thome Model School 100.00 





§5,314.49 




Unexpended 


Expended 


Balance 


$188.47 




99.55 




1,416.00 




400.00 




25.08 




588.81 




187.23 




175.00 




290.56 




50.00 




25.50 


$142.91 


28.14 


21.86 


28.44 


41.56 


50.00 




254.78 


45.22 


235.00 




7.20 




34.28 




13.09 




100.00 





1919] 



Annual Report of Alumnae Association 



15 





Unexpended 


A pproprialion 


Expended Balance 


$20.31 


$20.31 


16.26 


16.26 


20.00 


20.00 


26.24 


26.24 


226.77 


226.77 


7.68 


7.68 


465.00 


$465.00 


83.55 


83.55 






Expense of Chinese Scholarship Committee 

Olmsted's bill for Plans of Grounds 

Student News Reporters 

Service Flag 

Athletic Association 

Electrician's wages paid during illness 

Tablets for Infirmary and Cloister 

Unappropriated balance 

$5,314.49 $4,514.39 $800.10 
SPECIAL DONATIONS FOR ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS' SALARIES 1917-1918 

Received Expended 

Albert Strauss $200.00 $200.00 

Allan Marquand 100.00 100.00 

James Murphy 100.00 100.00 

G. W. Leutkemeyer 100.00 100.00 

James Timpson 210.75 210.75 

Carleton Mosely 210.75 210.75 

Rosalie N. Walter 100.00 100.00 

Walton Clark 210. 75 210. 75 

Charlotte H. Sorchan 210.75 210.75 

Mary Carus 210.25 210.25 

$1,653.25 $1,653.25 
SUMMARY OF UNEXPECTED BALANCES DONATION ACCOUNT 

Unexpended balance scholarships $2,645 . 00 

Unexpended balance of other Donations previous to 1917-18 , 665 . 13 

Unexpended balance Donations 1917-18 502 . 12 

President's Gift for 1917-18 800. 10 

$4,612.35 

APPENDIX B 

Phebe Anna Thorne Model School 
operating account 

1917-1918 

Receipts: 

Income from Phebe Anna Thorne Fund received by Treasurer $6,717 .49 

Other receipts by Comptroller: 

Tuition $13,200.00 

Interest on notes 5.17 

Books paid for by pupils 270 . 53 

Supplies paid for by pupils 183.00 

Pupils' Dress paid for by pupils 382 .33 

Garden Produce sold 6.50 

Luncheons paid for by pupils 960 . 00 

Refunds: 

Wages $8.57 

Entertainments 30.53 39.10 15,046.63 

Total income .• $21,764. 12 

Expenditures: 

Salaries paid by Treasurer $10,738 . 67 

Director s expenses $29.41 

Luncheons for pupils 3,660 . 00 

Special preparations for Teachers, Summer 1917 32 .07 

Expense for Candidates for appointment 159 . 52 

Books for Library 50 . 45 

Class Room Books 237 .66 

Class Room Supplies 186 . 52 

Class Room Equipment 84 . 81 

Laboratory for Physics 122 .21 

Loom for Weaving 57.17 

College entrance Examination fee 65 .00 

Rental of Piano '. 40 . 00 

Health Examinations 48 . 00 

Pupils' Dress 372 .01 

Laundry 4.57 

Entertainments 22 . 95 

Office expense 31.33 

Incidentals, postage, printing, etc 245 . 16 

Telephone 33 . 50 

Rent of Dolgelly 1,300.00 

Heating and Electric Lighting 484. 26 

Water Rent 52.05 

Gas 3.67 

Grounds 133.08 

Repairs 121.29 

Furniture 251.05 

Insurance 45.77 

Wages 571 .32 8,444.83 

Total Operating Expenditure 19,183 . 50 

Surplus, 1917-18 $2,580.62 

Note.— Of this surplus, $1,000.00 is applied to the accumulated debt of $12,016.07 as stated September 30, 1917, and 
the balance reserved for construction to be expended in 1918-19. 



16 The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly [April 

CONSTRUCTION ACCOUNT 

1917-1918 

Accumulated deficit on Construction to September 30, 1917 $8,554.55 

Freight and duty on Model for Japanese Theatre 111.85 

Deficit on Construction to September 30, 1918 $8,666.40 

SUMMARY FOR 1917-18 

Deficit on Construction $1 1 1 . 85 

Surplus on Operating Account 2,580 . 62 

Net surplus for year $2,468.77 

Deficit from previous years 12,016.07 $9,547.30 

SUMMARY OF MODEL SCHOOL DEBT 

Deficit on Construction $8,666 . 40 

Deficit on Operating Account September 30, 1917 $3,461 . 52 

Amount agreed to be applied annually toward extinguishing of accumulated debt 1,000.00 

Deficit from operating 2,461 . 52 

Stated debt, September 30, 1918 $11,127 .92 

Balance of surplus for 1917-18, held for construction, temporarily credited to debt . 1,580 .62 



$9,547.30 



Cost of Tuition in Bryn Mawr College for the Year 1917-18 

(Method A) 

Total number of Students: 485, of whom 403 are Undergraduates and 82 are Graduates 

Academic Expenses of the College for the year as stated below: 

Teaching Salaries $118,846.02 

Academic Salaries (Non-Teaching) 15,561 .53 

Academic Salaries (60%) Executive 14,802 . 1 1 

Other Academic Expenses 77,626.09 

Total $226,835 . 75 

Cost per Graduate and Undergraduate Student $467 .70 

Cost per Graduate Student 663 . 23 

Cost per Undergraduate Student 428 . 98 

The first calculation shows the cost per student without distinction between Graduate and Undergraduate. 
The second calculation shows only the actual cost of hours of teaching each graduate student. 

It is assumed that the complete plant and organization of the College woud be required if only Undergraduates were 
admitted. 

The calculation is as follows: 

Teaching Salaries $37,328 . 83 

Fellowships 7,875 .00 

Graduate Scholarships 5,407 . 65 

Foreign Scholarships 2,773.62 

Cost of extra Printing, etc. (Estimate) 1,000.00 

Total $54,385 . 10 

Cost per Graduate Student $663.23 

The third calculation is obtained by deducting the cost as stated above. It shows the cost of 402 Undergraduates is 
$172,450.65 or: 

Cost per Undergraduate Student $428 .98 

(Method B) 

Students in Bryn Mawr College in year 1917-18 — 485. Graduate Students — 82; 
undergraduate students — 403. 

CALCULATION 

100% 68M 31 T %% 

Total Undergraduate Graduate 

Number of Students 485 403 82 

Teaching Salaries $118,846.02 $81,517. 19 $37,328.83 

Academic Salaries (non-teaching) 15,561.53 10,675.21 4,886.32 

Academic Salaries (60% administrative and executive) 14,802 .11 10,154 . 25 4,647 . 86 

Academic Expenses 77,626.09 53,251.50 24,374.59 

Total $226,835.75 $155,598. 15 $71,237.60 

Cost per Student $467.70 $386.10 $868.74 

COST PER GRADUATE STUDENT — TUITION ONLY $868.74 

Teaching Salaries $37,328 . 83 $455 . 23 

Academic Salaries (non-teaching) 4,886 .32 59 . 59 

Academic Salaries Administrative 4,647 .86 56 . 67 

Academic Expenses 24,374 .59 297.25 

$71,237.60 $868.74 

COST PER UNDERGRADUATE STUDENT — TUITION ONLY, $386.10 

Teaching Salaries $81,517 . 19 $202 . 28 

Academic Salaries (non-teaching) 10,675.21 26.49 

Academic Salaries (administrative) 10,154.25 25.20 

Academic Expenses 53,251.50 132.13 

$155,598.15 $386.10 



1919] Annual Report of Alumnae Association 17 



EXPLANATION OF METHOD B OF CALCULATION 

Charged to tuition are all purely teaching salaries = $118,846.02; subdivided on hourly basis 
between graduates and undergraduates: Cost of graduate hours of teaching $37,328.83, or 31 ^ per 
cent of total teaching salaries, cost of undergraduate hours of teaching, $81,517.19, or 68-^ per cent 
of total teaching salaries. 

Charged to tuition are all non-teaching academic salaries, including salaries of Dean of College 
and Dean's Secretary, librarian and library assistants, Director and Assistant Director and stenogra- 
pher of department of gymnastics and athletics, laboratory student assistants, student messengers, 
student proctors, stenographer to Carola Woerishoffer Department = $15,561.53. The cost of non- 
teaching academic salaries is subdivided between graduate and undergraduate cost of tuition accord- 
ing to the cost of the proportion of hours of teaching given to graduate and undergraduate students; 
that is, 31^0 per cent of the total of $15,561.53 is charged to graduate cost of tuition = $4,886.32 
and 6870 per cent is charged to undergraduate cost of tuition = $10,675.21. 

Charged to tuition as academic salaries is 60 per cent of the total administrative and executive 
salaries of the President of the College, Recording Dean, Comptroller, Business Manager and the 
assistants and stenographers of the same = $14,802.11. The remaining 40 per cent of these salaries 
= $9,732.17 is charged to non-academic administration. The above amount of $14,802.11 is subdi- 
vided between graduate and undergraduate cost of tuition according to the cost of the proportion of 
hours of teaching given to graduate and undergraduate students; that is, 31^0 per cent of the total 
of $14,802.11 is charged to graduate cost of tuition = $4,647.86 and 68~ per cent is charged to 
undergraduate cost of tuition = $10,154.25. 

Charged to tuition are all costs of maintenance of purely academic buildings (including Taylor 
Hall, Dalton Hall, Library, Gymnasium, Advanced Psychological Laboratory and first floor of Car- 
tref Cottage), running expenses of all laboratories, running expenses of library and purchase of books, 
scholarships, class room supplies, lectures, entertainments, religious services, net cost of printing of 
calendar and register, all subscriptions to educational committees and other purely academic expenses, 
including the treasurer's expenses, caring for endowment. Cost of maintenance of grounds, office 
expenses and telephones are divided between academic expenses and non-academic expenses in the 
proportion of 60 per cent academic and 40 per cent non-academic. Total academic expenses = 
$77,626.09, which amount is subdivided between graduate and undergraduate cost of tuition accord- 
ing to the cost of the hours of teaching; that is, 31-^- per cent of the total (= $24,374.59) is charged 
to cost of graduate tuition and 68^- per cent (= $53,251.50) is charged to cost of undergraduate 
tuition. 

No interest on capital invested in grounds, academic buildings and equipment, and no deprecia- 
tion of same, are included in the above calculation. The cost of tuition represents only the actual 
cash expenditure of the year in question. No permanent improvements to the academic plant made 
during the year have been included, as these are not regarded as properly belonging to the teaching 
of any given year, although they are made solely for the benefit of instructors and students. 

AUDITOR'S REPORT 

28th January, 1919 
We have audited the accounts of both the Treasurer and Comptroller of Bryn Mawr College 
for the fiscal year ended 30th September, 1918, and found them to be correct, and we hereby cer- 
tify that the receipts and expenditures of the College for the year contained in this Financial Report 
are properly stated from the books of the Treasurer and Comptroller. 

Lybeand, Ross Brothers and Montgomery, 

Certified Public Accountants. 



18 The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly [April 

> 

TREASURER'S REPORT 

For Twelve Months Ended December 31, 1918 

Miss Bertha S. Ehlers, Treasurer, 

The Alumnae Association of Bryn Mawr College, 
123 Waverly Place, New York City. 

Dear Madam: 

We have audited the books and records of The Alumnae Association of Bryn Mawr College for 
the twelve months ended December 31, 1918. In connection therewith we have verified the Cash, 
Endowment Fund and Alumnae Fund Securities on hand and deposited with banks and fiscal agents 
at the close of the year and have prepared a Balance Sheet and relative accounts which are sub- 
mitted herewith as follows: 

Exhibit A — Balance Sheet, December 31, 1918. 

Statements of Receipts and Disbursements for the twelve months ended December 31, 1918, viz.: 

Exhibit B — Endowment Fund. 

Exhibit C — Loan Fund. 

Exhibit D — Alumnae Fund. 

Exhibit E — Bryn Mawr Service Corps. 

Exhibit F — Bryn Mawr College Patriotic Farm. 

Exhibit G — General Treasury Fund. 

Exhibit H — Quarterly Account. 

In connection with the assets of the Alumnae Fund, we note that one item carried on your books 
last year as "3/10 rights Lehigh Coal & Nav. Co. Stock" at a valuation of $2.10, does not appear 
among your securities at the close of the year 1918, nor do we find any record of its disposition. 
We have therefore reduced the assets of the Alumnae Fund by this amount which we have charged 
off against the Alumnae Fund income for the year. 

Relative to the Endowment Fund Assets, you have informed us that securities to the amount of 
$100,000.00 have been tendered to the trustee of the M. E. Garrett Memorial Endowment Fund, 
but acceptance of the deed of gift has been deferred, and in lieu of immediate delivery of the prin- 
cipal, the income from $100,000.00 at the rate of 4% annually is being paid to the trustee in monthly 
installments of $500.00 per month for eight months beginning October 1, 1918. 

Subject to the above comments, we certify that the exhibits referred to herein, are properly 
drawn up so as to set forth a correct view of the financial position of the Association as shown by its 
books at December 31, 1918, and of the operations for the year ended on that date. 

Yours very truly, 

Gunn, Richards & Co. 

BALANCE SHEET, DECEMBER 31, 1918 

ASSETS 

Endowment Fund: 

Cash Uninvested $2,238.16 

Investments at Cost: 

United States Liberty Loan Bonds $17,800.00 

United States War Savings Stamps and Thrift 

Stamps 421 .86 

Railroad and Industrial Bonds 83,012 . 77 

Bryn Mawr College Inn 2nd Mortgage 5% Bonds — 

1946 5,000.00 106,234.63 $108,472.79 

Loan Fund Assets: 

Cash $2,160. 12 

Loans to Students 9,545.00 11,705.12 



1919] Annual Report of Alumnae Association 19 

Alumnae Fund Assets: 

Cash 

Accounts Receivable 

Investments at Cost: 

United States Fourth 4J% Liberty Loan Bonds. . . $2,500 .00 
41 shares Lehigh Coal and Nav. Co. Stock — Par 

Value $50.00 share 3,313.48 



Service Corps Assets: 

Cash 

General Treasury Fund Assets: 

Cash 

General Treasury Fund Deficit. 



$236.03 




40.18 




5,813.48 


$6,089.69 




10,565.29 




86.00 




352.51 




$137,271.40 



LIABILITIES 

Endowment Fund: 

Balance, January 1, 1918 $94,075.00 

Contributions and Subscriptions during year $11,790.46 

Income from Investments $4,413 . 87 

Less: Endowment Fund 

Expense $315.54 

Payments on Account 
M. E. Garrett Me- 
morial Fund In- 
come 1,500.00 1,815.54 2,598.33 14,388.79 $108,463.79 



Accounts Payable from Endowment Fund $9 .00 

Loan Fund: 

Balance, January 1, 1918 $11,044.32 

Donations and Interest Received during year 660 .80 11 ,705 . 12 



Alumnae Fund: 

Principal— Balance, January 1, 1918 $3,784.86 

Principal — Life Memberships Received during year 2 10 . 00 $3,994 . 86 



Interest— Balance, January 1, 1918 $1,861 .76 

Interest— Net Income during year 233 .07 2,094. 83 6,089 . 69 



Service Corps Fund 10,565.29 

Accounts Payable from General Treasury Fund 438.51 



$ 137,271.40 

ENDOWMENT FUND 
Cash Balance, January 1, 1918 $3,388. 13 

Receipts 

Cash Donations $7,968.60 

Investments Matured (U. S. Government 4|% Certificate 

of Indebtedness) 500.00 

Income from Investments 4,415 .39 

Interest on Bank Deposits 25 .28 



Total Cash Receipts $12,909.27 



20 The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly [April 

Securities Donated: 

U. S. First 3|% Liberty Bonds $150.00 

U. S. First 4|% Liberty Bonds 50.00 

U. S. Second 4% Liberty Bonds 50.00 

U. S. Second 4|% Liberty Bonds 50 .00 

U. S. Third 4|% Liberty Bonds 2,700.00 

U. S. Fourth 4|% Liberty Bonds 400.00 

U. S. War Savings Stamps and Certificates 419.86 

U. S. Thrift Stamps 2 .00 $3,821 .86 

Total Receipts $16,731 . 13 

$20,119.26 

Disbursements 
Investments Purchased: 

$8300. U. S. Third 4J% Liberty Bonds $8,300.00 

500. U. S. Government 4|% Certificate of Indebted- 
ness due 11/7/18 500.00 

1000. Reading R. R. Co. Equipment Trust 4|% due 

7/1/20 960.90 

1000. Lehigh Valley R. R. Co. 10 year Collateral Trust 

6% due 9/1/28 982.50 

1000. Atlantic City R. R. Co. Mortgage 5% due 

5/1/19 982.50 

500. U. S. Fourth 4|% Liberty Bonds 500.00 $12,225.90 

Accrued Interest on Bonds Purchased 26. 80 

Commission to Fiscal Agent and Cost of Power of Attorney 71 .48 

Expenses, Finance Committee 235 .06 

Payments to Asa Wing, Account M. E. Garrett Memorial Fund Income. . 1,500 . 00 

Total Cash Disbursements $14,059 . 24 

Donated Securities Delivered to Fiscal Agent $3,321 .86 

Donated Securities on Hand December 31, 1918 : . 500 .00 3,821 . 86 

Cash Balance, December 31, 1918: 

Fidelity Trust Co $1,681 .76 

Less: Amount due Expense Fund for Expenses, Fi- 
nance Committee 17.25 $1^664.51 

Pennsylvania Co. — due from Expense Fund for Interest 

Collected, B. M. Trust Co 9.62 

On Hand 626.50 

$2,300.63 
Less: Amount due Pennsylvania Co. Income Account. 62.47 2,238.16 

$20,119.26 
LOAN FUND 
Balance, January 1, 1918 $786.32 

Receipts 

Donations $518.23 

Repayments of Loans by Students 1,843 .00 

Interest on Loans 119.51 

Interest on Bank Deposit 23 .06 

Total Receipts 2,503.80 

$3,290.12 



1919] Annual Report of Alumnae Association 21 

Disbursements 

Loans to Students $1,130.00 

Balance, December 31, 1918 on Deposit in Girard Trust Co 2,160.12 

$3,290.12 

ALUMNAE FUND 
Balance, January 1, 1918 $2,331 .04 

Receipts 

Life Memberships $210.00 

Income from Investments 123 . 00 

Interest on Bank Deposits 73 . 63 

Total Receipts 406.63 

$2,737.67 

Disbursements 
Investments Purchased: 

U. S. Fourth 4|% Liberty Bonds $2,500.00 

Commission to Fiscal Agent for Collection of Income 1 . 64 

Total Disbursements $2,501 . 64 

Balance, December 31, 1918, on Deposit in Western Saving Fund Society. 236 .03 

"$2,737.67 

BRYN MAWR SERVICE CORPS 

Receipts 

Donations $27,573.02 

Interest on Bank Deposits 144 . 77 

Gift to pay for Check Book 8.63 $27,726.42 

Refund of Check for Expenses of Mary E. Shenstone 2,000.00 

Total Receipts $29,726.42 

Disbursements 

Expenses of Workers $19,152 . 50 

Cost of Check Book 8.63 

Total Disbursements $19,161 . 13 

Balance, December 31, 1918: 

On Deposit Bryn Mawr Trust Co $10,395.29 

On Hand 170.00 10,565.29 

$29,726.42 

BRYN MAWR COLLEGE PATRIOTIC FARM 

Receipts 

Donations $1,197.25 

Interest on Bank Deposits .49 

Total Receipts $1,197 . 74 

Disbursements 

Horses, Wagon and Harness $215 .00 

Salary 46.15 $261.15 

Balance paid over to Sue Airs Blake 936 . 59 

Total Disbursements $1,197.74 



22 The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly [April 

GENERAL TREASURY— EXPENSE ACCOUNT 

Balance, January 1, 1918 $292 .32 

Receipts 

Dues $1,726 . 73 

Less: Dues Refunded 1 .50 $1,725.23 

Alumnae Supper 106 .00 

Bank Interest 13 . 19 

Total Receipts $1,844.42 

$2,136.74 

Disbursements 

Dues, Associated Collegiate Alumnae $35 .00 

Printing: 

Balance, 1917 Accounts 69.60 

Current Bills, 1918 120.85 190.45 

Postage and Stationery: 

Balance, 1917 Accounts 10.75 

Current Bills, 1918 , 133.51 144.26 

Traveling Expenses 54.30 

Expenses, Academic Committee Meeting 168 .21 

Expenses, Athletic Committee 4 . 50 

Typewriting and Clerical Services 255 .41 

Expenses, Committee on Exhibits 18 . 30 

Expenses, Alumnae Supper 116.00 

Miscellaneous Expenses 79 . 31 

Quarterly Account, Expenses $1,018 . 12 

Less: Receipts from Sales and Donations 33 . 12 985 .00 

Total Disbursements $2,050.74 

Balance, December 31, 1918: 

Deposited Pennsylvania Co $77 . 37 

Less: Amount Due Endowment Fund 9 . 62 $67 . 75 

Due from Endowment Fund in Fidelity Trust Co 17.25 

Cash on Hand 1 .00 86.00 

$2,136.74 
"QUARTERLY" ACCOUNT FOR YEAR 1918 

Receipts 

Subscriptions and Sales $32 . 12 

Donations 1 . 00 

Total Receipts $33 . 12 

Balance Transferred from General Treasury Expense Account 985.00 

$1,018.12 
Disbursements 

Printing $644.13 

Salaries 307.50 

Sundries, postage, stationery, etc 66 . 49 

Total Disbursements $1,018. 12 



1919] 



Annual Report of Alumnae Association 



23 



REPORT OF THE ALUMNAE DIRECTORS 



In January, 1918, the faculty committee on 
pensions called the attention of the directors to 
the fact that the Carnegie Foundation cannot 
help the College to pension its older professors 
because of the sectarian clause in the charter. 
The faculty committee asked the pension com- 
mittee of the Board to consider the possibility 
and advisability of recommending to the Board 
that the charter be changed to meet the above 
mentioned difficulties. It was understood by 
the faculty committee that the charter could be 
so amended without affecting in any way the 
observance by the directors of the will of Dr. 
Taylor. 

Petition for amendment to the charter was 
made in June and was granted by the Mont- 
gomery County court on August 1, 1918. 

Two clauses are eliminated by this amend- 
ment, the first giving preference to students who 
are members of the Society of Friends, and the 
second providing that no one shall be elected a 
member of the corporation who is not a member 
of the Society of Orthodox Friends. 



Running expenses of the 

college $23,002.21 

Model school 9,547.30 

Infirmary, balance due on 

construction 6,889 .00 

Trefa and Aelwyd, balance 

due on construction 3,413.46 



$42,851.97 
On March 10, 1910, the College was out of 
debt. From that time until the tuition fee was 
raised, and the income from the new endow- 
ment became available (September 30, 1911) a 
fresh debt of $33,335.58 for running expenses 
was incurred. Since 1911, in spite of occasional 
further deficits, the debt has been reduced by 
$10,000. 

At present $1000 a year from the Phoebe 
Anna Thorne fund is being applied to repay the 
debt on construction of the model school. 
After deducting this amount and the salary of 
the professor of Education, the entire income is 
applied to the expenses of the Model School. 



Emergency Charge 

The emergency charge of $50 made in 1917- 
18 brought in $19,350. The definite increase in 
costs due to war conditions, charged against 
this fund, amounted to $19,009.23. The largest 
items were: Coal, $8698.92 Provisions, $3414.50, 
Wages of hall employes, $3419.48, Wages of 
workmen, $2643.87. 

Owing to the further increase in cost of living, 
an emergency charge of $100 was made for 
the year 1918-19. Undergraduate students 
holding scholarships given for financial need, 
graduate students taking less than eight hours 
of work, as well as those holding fellowships 
and scholarships, are exempt from the charge. 
About $35,000 will be received from this years 
charge. $7000 will be needed to meet the fur- 
ther increase in hall wages. The increase in 
teaching salaries for the year will amount to 
nearly $6000 in addition to $4000 from the 
Mary Elizabeth Garrett fund. 

The College Debt 

The present debt of the College as shown by 
the Treasurer's report amounts to $42,851.97. 
This is composed of the following items: 



Mary Elizabeth Garrett Professorship 

Information having been received at the 
October meeting that a minute of acceptance of 
the alumnae deed of gift would be passed by the 
Trustees it was resolved that the Board of 
Directors name the Head of the Department of 
English, Professor Lucy M. Donnelly as the 
holder of the Mary Elizabeth Garrett Professor- 
ship of English. It was further resolved that 
the amount released be appropriated to in- 
crease to $2500, the salaries of four associate 
professors, and to $1250, the salary of one asso- 
ciate professor giving half time. The balance 
remaining after raising the salaries of the above 
associate professors shall be distributed pro rata 
to increase the salaries of all full professors 
holding permanent appointments who are teach- 
ing in the college during the current year. 

Sage Bequest 

Mrs. Russell Sage bequeathed to Bryn Mawr 
College one-fifty-second part of her residuary 
estate. According to information received 
from her executors, this will probably amount 
to $600,000. 

At a meeting of the Trustees on December 
20, 1918, it was "Resolved That the Treasurer 



24 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[April 



be and is hereby authorized to receive from the 
Executors under the will of Margaret Olivia Sage 
the bequest of the Trustees of Bryn Mawr Col- 
lege under said will. Resolved further that the 
money or securities which shall be received from 
this bequest shall be set aside as a separate 
fund to be known as the Russell Sage and Mar- 
garet Olivia Sage Endowment Fund, the in- 
come only to be used for such purposes as the 
Trustees shall from time to time determine and 
direct." 



It was further voted by the Directors of the 
College to request the executive committee, 
after consultation with appropriate committees 
of the Directors and of the Faculty and with 
the Academic Committee of the Alumnae Asso- 
ciation, to suggest to a future meeting of the 
board a plan for the apportionment of the in- 
come from the Sage legacy and an outline of the 
policy of the college for the immediate future. 

Elizabeth Butler Kirkbrtde. 



REPORT OF ACADEMIC COMMITTEE 



The present academic committee cannot pre- 
sent to you an unbroken history of work since 
January, 1918. We must begin with December 
7 of last year when Mrs. Francis called a meet- 
ing of your new substitute committee to take 
the place of the usual autumn meeting which 
had lapsed because of the resignation of so 
many of the members of the old committee. 
Since that meeting of less than two months ago, 
various members of the new committee have 
met at different times, both in New York and 
Bryn Mawr, but the committee as a whole did 
not come together until it met for the January- 
conferences with the President and members of 
the Faculty of the college. 

Thus we present to you at this time a report 
of our conferences of a week ago. 

Entrance Examinations 

The working out of the many changes in 
entrance requirements is well under way, but 
results will not be evident until the old rulings 
have quite given place to the new. In the pres- 
ent year the opportunity to enter without offer- 
ing physics either in the old or new form comes 
to an end. After 1919 all students will enter 
with physics and the College will then be able 
to estimate the value to college work in science 
of this change in scientific emphasis which has 
for many years interested the academic com- 
mittee. The next most important change, 
that of lightening the language requirement for 
entrance, does not become uniform in its appli- 
cation until 1923. Not until after that time 
may interesting results in the language situation 
be looked for. This is also true with regard to 
the so called "written orals." When the new 
system of language requirements, both before 



and after entering College, has become uniform 
in its working, it will be possible to determine 
the essential character and value of the new 
language policy at Bryn Mawr. 

Others Drop Certificate 

In connection with the changes in entrance 
requirements that have been made at Bryn 
Mawr it is interesting to note that within the 
past few years four of the other women's col- 
leges and some of the men's colleges have with- 
drawn the privilege of entrance by certificate, 
against which Bryn Mawr has held out so 
long, — and that these colleges now require, in 
addition to a certificate of scholarship, compre- 
hensive examinations in four subjects. 

Another phase of the entrance question pre- 
sents itself with the necessity to limit the num- 
ber of entering students to the capacity of the 
college for housing them on the campus. The 
objection's to boarding houses and other off- 
campus accommodations are obvious. This 
makes a limited freshmen class necessary. 
Looking toward this, Bryn Mawr has this year 
for the first time put into its catalogue the state- 
ment that "in the admission of students pref- 
erence will be given to candidates of the highest 
promise, due regard being paid to examination 
grades, including the number of points passed, 
and also evidence as to character, health, and 
general ability." This entails giving greater 
consideration to the statements of schools than 
has been the policy of Bryn Mawr in the past. 

In connection with this problem and all of the 
many that belong to the relation of the schools 
to the college in regard to entrance preparation, 
the committee urged that educational values be 
stressed equally with administrative. 



1919] 



Annual Report of Alumnae Association 



25 



Elimination of Weak Students 

The committee is interested to note that in 
connection with its suggestion of a year ago the 
senate of the faculty passed a ruling to the 
following effect: 

"Resolution passed by the Senate, May 3, 
1918. 

That the practice of compelling a student in 
danger of losing her degree through the opera- 
tion of the merit law to remain in college for 
five years be discontinued and she be asked to 
leave College not later than the end of her 
Junior year. In view of existing conditions a 
student who has less than half her merits may 
be asked to leave college at the end of the pres- 
ent year." 

Following the petition of the undergraduates, 
it was voted that this last clause should not 
become operative until next year but after 
that could be used in any given case, should 
necessity therefor arise. 

This is a distinct step towards weeding out 
the weaker students in college, one which will 
aid in solving the problem of numbers and 
housing and tend towards maintaining the 
high standard of scholarship at Bryn Mawr. 
It remains to be seen how effective the applica- 
tion of such a ruling may be made. 



Methods of Instruction 

There have been many changes in the teach- 
ing of various subjects at Bryn Mawr within the 
last few years. In general the tendency seems 
to be to increase the numbers of quizzes and 
short reports, written or oral, which at intervals 
take the place of the daily lecture. The com- 
mittee were most interested in hearing from the 
professors of the several subjects descriptions of 
their manner of conducting their courses in 
French, Political Science and Philosophy, in all 
of which valuable methods were being applied. 
They also welcomed the statement from Presi- 
dent Thomas that the passage in the calendar 
stating that "whenever possible in courses the 
instruction is given by means of lectures" is now 
considered obsolete and will not be included in 
the description of courses another year. The 
suggestion was made that informal class room 
discussion is a process educationally valuable 
as a substitute for the lecture and that it might 
well be emphasized in college teaching. 



Cutting 

The regulation of class room attendance 
seemed to the committee to have a sufficient 
bearing on educational tendencies and values 
to make a survey of the present situation in 
college worth while. 

As the alumnae association knows, two years 
ago a cut rule went into effect by which the 
office regulated all attendance on academic 
classes, imposed penalties for non-attendance 
and dealt with all excuses. Last year the 
undergraduate association, in conference with 
a special committee of the faculty, inaugurated 
a system by which the students as well as the 
faculty, keep the attendance record. The stu- 
dents are responsible for infringements of rule 
to their own committee which has the power, in 
co-operation with the faculty, to inflict penal- 
ties. This experiment in student-faculty co- 
operation seems to work out to the satisfaction 
of all concerned, the only disadvantage being the 
duplication of work entailed in the keeping of a 
double record. 

In their attempt to analyze and cope with the 
problem of class room attendance successfully, 
the students emphasized the connection be- 
tween class room methods and cutting. (The 
report of the conference committee contains a 
detailed description of the method of recording 
cuts.) 

Pensions 

On the important issue of pensions, especially 
on the question of accepting or rejecting the 
new Carnegie plan for a contributory annuity, 
Bryn Mawr has not yet taken final action. As 
was brought out in the report of last year on 
this subject, the fixing of a retiring age is impor- 
tant for the college and is inevitably contingent 
on a plan for assuring to its professors a retiring 
allowance. 

The new Carnegie plan which is now under 
discussion provides for the joint contribution by 
the college and by the professor, each paying 
5 per cent of the annual salary, toward the pro- 
vision of a retiring allowance or annuity, while 
the Carnegie Foundation bears the costs of 
administration. Some of the details of this 
plan have been severely criticised; on the whole 
however, the alternative schemes proposed seem 
less advantageous. A decision on the part of 
the coDege to enter the Carnegie plan would 



26 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[April 



have to be made within the coming year, and 
the College is at present giving the matter the 
fullest consideration. 

Special Courses 

Two interesting points of contact with exist- 
ing institutions in Philadelphia and other local- 
ities made by the department of Social Econ- 
omy and Social Research within the last year 
seem to the committee worthy a short descrip- 
tion on account of their value both to the col- 
lege and to the community. Through the 
course on Employment Management, which is 
financed by the Young Women's Christian Asso- 
ciation as a war emergency course and carried 
on under the direction of Dr. Kingsbury here 
at Bryn Mawr, the department has succeeded 
in supplying to the industrial world a group of 
students, trained as experts in all problems of 
Industrial Supervision and Employment Man- 
agement. The course has covered four months 
of summer field work with theory and four 
months, or one semester, of both theory and 
practice. Industrial supervisors and employ- 
ers in many parts of the country have co- 
operated most generously in furnishing oppor- 
tunity for the students to learn in the shops 
every department of trade and become familiar 
with employment problems through actual 



experience. The course prepares thirty stu- 
dents during the year, the first ten of whom 
received their certificates Thursday night. It 
has done the double work of supplying to the 
industrial world a type of trained woman much 
needed in present day problems and of giving to 
Bryn Mawr as an institution the opportunity 
to make a valuable contribution to the 
community. 

The college hopes it may be possible to con- 
tinue such a course, but it is uncertain whether 
the Young Women's Christian Association will 
be able to supply funds for it in the future. 

Another new field of work on which this 
Department has entered, has brought about an 
official relation through Miss Kellogg, In- 
structor in the Department, with the Municipal 
Court in Philadelphia for the purpose of furnish- 
ing a laboratory for the students and of aiding 
in the effort to advance the standards of court 
procedure and probation. This work promises 
to bring interesting results. 

The Committee has endeavored to carry out 
the will of the association to the best of its 
ability and asks you to make use of it in any 
way that is practical, through suggestions for or 
questions about any parts of its work. 
Respectfully submitted, 

Frances Browne, 

Chairman. 



REPORT OF JOINT ADMINISTRATIVE COMMITTEE OF 
BRYN MAWR SERVICE CORPS 



Immediately after the last alumnae meeting 
which authorized the joint action of the College 
and alumnae association in the raising and ad- 
ministration of the Bryn Mawr Service Corps 
Fund the Joint Administrative Committee was 
organized as follows: 

1. Chairman of the War Council of the Col- 
lege: Virginia Kneeland, now Gordon Wood- 
bury. 

2. Chairman of the Committee on Red Cross 
and Allied Relief: Elizabeth Houghton, now 
Miss Kellogg. 

3. A member from the student body: Doro- 
thea Chambers. 

4. A faculty member: Dean Helen Taft. 

5. 6, 7. The three members of the alumnae 
committee: Martha P. Thomas, A. C. Dimon, 
Marion Reilly. 

Miss Dimon was elected secretary and treas- 
urer and Miss Reilly chairman. 



The first business of the committee was to 
determine the basis of membership in the Serv- 
ice Corps. In view of the fact that a large 
number of Bryn Mawr women were already 
working abroad and that it was almost impos- 
sible to get in touch with them all or attempt to 
estimate the value of their work, it seemed wise 
to the committee to call members of the Service 
Corps only those who were directly supported in 
whole or in part from the fund. Alumnae who 
were able and willing to pay their own expenses, 
were asked to contribute the amount they were 
able to spend to the Service Corps Fund, and 
have their expenses defrayed directly from the 
fund. 

It was the policy of the Committee to work 
directly with the war organizations already con- 
trolling the relief work, trying if possible, to 
place our workers on a salaried basis in each 
organization. 



1919] 



Annual Report of Alumnae Association 



27 



We felt that if we could appoint workers who 
were worth paying a salary to and worth put- 
ting on a salary basis, we should be contribut- 
ing the kind of service that we particularly 
desired to render. 

The Y. M. C. A. eventually adopted a salary 
basis for all its workers, accepting a sum of 
$1500 for the expenses of a canteen worker for 
one year, including a maintenance allowance of 
$100 a month, transportation and uniform, and 
requiring in addition $500 as an emergency fund 
to be provided by each worker. 

The American Friends' Committee also ex- 
pressed itself willing to use any funds which we 
might give them for individual workers in the 
form of salary or maintenance fund through 
their organization. 

The Red Cross had adopted a general scheme 
of volunteer workers and had no arrangement 
apparently for the support of salaried workers 
from individual funds. I felt particularly 
anxious to establish our workers on a salaried 
basis with the Red Cross, as it seemed to me 
to assure us that they were really needed, and 
also to give the work a professional and stable 
character. 

Finally the Red Cross did consent to take our 
candidates on this basis with the payment of 
$2000 for each worker for the year. This 
amount included transportation, uniform, some 
equipment and a salary of $125 a month. 

As the expenses for workers during the first 
few months of the work of the Committee were 
not standardized, we found it necessary to have 
some definite information from abroad as to liv- 
ing expenses in different kinds of war work. We 
asked Elizabeth Sergeant, who was already in 
France, as the representative of the New Repub- 
lic, to give us all the information she could in 
regard to the work abroad : living expenses, sup- 
plies and equipment, where women were most 
needed, what Bryn Mawr women over there 
were doing, and what was the most effective 
service we could render. 

She sent us most detailed and valuable infor- 
mation and in several cases most kindly pre- 
sented the names of our candidates to head- 
quarters and had them cabled for. 

As soon as the terms of service in the Corps 
were decided upon, the alumnae committee is- 
sued a circular describing the Service Corps to 
the Alumnae and former students, asking for 
contributions and subscriptions, and also for 
the names of those interested in work abroad. 
The branches and clubs were asked to appoint 



committees and collect for their districts. We 
also wrote to a number of Bryn Mawr women 
serving abroad, asking if we could assist in their 
work. 

The first member of the Service Corps to be 
appointed was Elizabeth S. Sergeant who was 
already abroad as a correspondent of the New 
Republic. As you know she has published a 
number of articles in the New Republic, and is 
I believe, about to publish a book. She is as 
far as we know our only casualty, having been 
burnt by an explosion of a bomb, while she was 
on a tour of the front lines, shortly after the 
armistice. She was seriously hurt, but will re- 
cover without permanent injury. Because of 
her previous residence in France and her very 
wide acquaintance, she has had unusual op- 
portunities to gather material for publication. 

2. The Committee has appointed seven can- 
teen workers under the Y. M. C. A. as members 
of the Service Corps. 

(a) Margaret Bontecou, 1909. European Fel- 
low and warden of Denbigh Hall. Miss Bonte- 
cou sailed in March 1918 and we have not heard 
from her recently. 

(b) Agnes E. Morrow, 1912. Miss Morrow 
has had a varied experience in teaching and 
publication work since her graduation. She 
sailed the latter part of May and has been most 
actively employed since she landed. She has 
worked in several canteens and has recently been 
entirely alone with no other women canteen 
workers. She speaks in one letter of selling 240 
gallons of drinks in one day as a mild example 
of what a canteen can do. Miss Morrow was 
sent to Paris during the summer to a joint con- 
ference of the English, French and American 
women on women's work. She speaks very en- 
thusiastically of the work and splendid fortitude 
of the French women. 

(c) Laura Hatch, Fellow in Geology, 1912- 
13. Instructor in Geology at Smith College. 
Miss Hatch sailed in June and is now stationed 
at La Courtine toward the south of France. 

(d) Elizabeth Snyder, 1903, teacher of French 
and German in the Ardmore High School. 
Miss Snyder was appointed as the Bryn Mawr 
member of an Intercollege Canteen unit organ- 
ized at the request of the Y. M. C. A. under the 
Intercollegiate Committee for Women's War 
Work Abroad. The demand for workers was so 
great that the unit was never completely assem- 
bled and those who were appointed were sent 
over individually. Miss Snyder sailed in Au- 
gust and landed in England. There they asked 



28 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[April 



for volunteers to serve in the American camps in 
England and Wales. She is now in France. 
She has had a great deal of canteen work and 
has also been called upon to conduct classes. 
Her previous experience as a teacher and her 
knowledge of French and German have been 
most useful. 

(e) Rosalie James, 1903. Miss James was 
teacher of French in Barnard College for a num- 
ber of years. She has worked in France and has 
for the last two years been engaged in social 
service work in this country. She sailed I 
think, in December, and arrived in France a 
couple of weeks ago. 

(f) Mary Agnes Irvine, 1910. Teacher of 
mathematics in Miss Madeira's School, Wash- 
ington. Miss Irvine also sailed in December 
and arrived in France with Miss James. 

(g) Amy L. Steiner, 1899. Miss Steiner was 
to have gone to France with Miss Putnam as a 
searcher under the Red Cross. She was all ready 
to sail when the order rescinding all appoint- 
ments for work abroad under the Red Cross 
was received. She transferred to the Y. M. C. 
A. Canteen Service and has just sailed. 

Red Cross Workers 

3. The Committee has appointed six workers 
under the Red Cross: 

(a) Charlotte I. Claflin, 1911. At the time of 
her appointment, Miss Claflin was serving as 
Infant Welfare Worker in Framingham, Mass. 
She has specialized in welfare work for young 
children and prenatal hygiene. She worked for 
two years among the Italians in New York, and 
was chosen by the Red Cross for Social Service 
Work in Italy. She sailed in August and is now 
stationed at Avellino, Italy. 

(b) Katherine Dame, Scholar in History 1894- 
95. Miss Dame has been for eight years in- 
structor and cataloguer in the New York State 
Library School. 

The Tuberculosis Commission to Italy desired 
a cataloguer and filing clerk who has some 
knowledge of Italian. We were able to appoint 
Miss Dame for this work, and she sailed in Sep- 
tember and is now in Rome. 

(c) Lily R. Taylor, Ph.D. Miss Taylor, who 
is instructor in Vassar College, was in Rome 
when the war broke out, as fellow at the Ameri- 
can Classical School. She went into Red Cross 
work at once, and became director of the dis- 
tribution of hospital supplies for a large district. 
We wrote to Miss Taylor about the Fund and 



she replied that she would be delighted to be- 
come a member of the Service Corps. 

(d) Lucie Reickenbach, 1910. Since her grad- 
uation Miss Reichenbach has specialized in Ro- 
mance Languages and has taught at Randolph- 
Macon and Western College for Women. She 
has also had social service experience. She 
sailed in September, was sent to Tours for social 
service work, but was transferred to hospital 
service as workers were very much needed. 

(e) Margaret S. Bradway, 1915. Miss Brad- 
way speaks French, has had experience as a 
teacher and has a knowledge of stenography and 
typewriting. She was appointed to the Hos- 
pital Hut Service and sailed, I think, in October. 
I have not heard from her since landing. 

(f) Helen Emerson, 1911. Miss Emerson 
speaks French and German. Has studied in 
Germany and had training in social service 
work. She sailed in November, shortly after 
the armistice was signed, for canteen work in 
France. 

Under American Friends 

4. The Committee has appointed two mem- 
bers of the Corps under the American Friends: 

(a) Anna Jones Haines, 1907. Miss Haines 
was given leave of absence from her position as 
inspector in division of housing and sanitation 
in Philadelphia, to work in Russia. She has 
been working in the Samara district but is now 
in Omsk. 

(b) Esther M. White, 1906. Miss White also 
has been working in the Samara district. 
Some months ago she went to Moscow to bring 
away a number of orphan children. She was 
unable to leave and is now in Moscow, probably 
the only American woman in European Russia 
at this time. It is not possible to communicate 
with her at present. 

For Near East 

At the request of the students, the Committee 
appropriated $1000 to be expended for Arme- 
nian and Syrian relief and appointed Dr. Mac- 
Callum, a member of the Persian Commission, 
to act as a member of the Service Corps and ex- 
pend the money. 

An appropriation of $350 was made for his liv- 
ing expenses. Dr. MacCallum was unable to go 
with the commission, so Dr. Post was appointed 
in his stead. Dr. Post is now, we think, in 
Persia. 



1919] 



Annual Report of Alumnae Association 



29 



This makes a total of 17 members of the 
Service Corps, 11 in France, 3 in Italy, 2 in 
Russia, and 1 in Persia. 

The actual cash appropriations and payments 
to the Fund will be given by Miss Ehlers who 
holds the Fund in trust. 

The total appropriations made by the com- 
mittee to date are as follows: 

Y. M. C. A. Workers 

M. Bontecou $900 

L. Hatch 500 

A.Morrow 2000 

E. Snyder 2000 

R.James 1500 

M.Irvine 1500 

A. Steiner 250 



$8650.00 

Red Cross Workers 

R. Reichenbach $2000 .00 

M. Bradway 900.00 

K. Dame 1000.00 

C. Claflin 2000.00 

R.Taylor 1200.00 

H. Emerson 2000.00 



$9100.00 



American Friends 

Anna J. Haines $500.00 

Esther White 500.00 



$1000.00 

Armenian Relief 

Dr. Post $1350.00 

E. Sergeant 1000.00 

Total appropriations $21,100.00 

Funds on Hand 

From the War Council of the 

CoUege $10,801 .00 

From Alumnae $15,978 .98 



$26780.98 
Promises due from Alumnae .. . 2500.00 



Balance unappropriated 



$29280.98 
. 8280.98 



Of all the amounts received $3850 was given 
for special purposes and $4100 by the members 
of the Service Corps. 



Brother Clause Stumbling Block 

The committee has had the usual difficulties 
connected with women workers in war time. 
We had appointed Helen Kempton, Margaret 
Corwin and Virginia McKenney for service 
abroad when the brother clause fell upon us. 
When it was removed, Miss Kempton and Miss 
Corwin had both taken up work which they 
could not leave and Miss McKenney in a mo- 
ment of discouragement had married. 

Mary Shenstone whom we could not send 
under the American Red Cross, as she is a Cana- 
dian, we had arranged to send over to work in 
the Shurtleff Memorial, but she also decided to 
marry. Miss Hilda Smith and Miss Goldmark 
who were both called for, were not able to leave 
their work on this side. Miss Landsberg, whom 
we wished to appoint, had Alsatian parents. 
Miss Frances Browne whom we had agreed to 
send as a searcher with Miss Putnam, was held 
up by the armistice. 

The alumnae committee wishes to pay special 
tribute to the college community and the war 
council of the college for their magnificent con- 
tributions to the fund; not only did they over- 
subscribe their quota of $10,000 for last year, but 
they are also raising $8000 for this year. 

The alumnae minimum of $20,000 we unfor- 
tunately did not meet. The Committee has 
written to all the Bryn Mawr workers abroad 
asking them to write us about their work, and 
to make suggestions as to the lines of future serv- 
ice for the Service Corps. We have not yet 
heard from them. We feel convinced that the 
demand for special trained workers will still 
continue, especially in the Near and Far East, 
and that not only will we be able to continue 
a number of our present workers abroad, but 
that there will be a distinct opportunity to send 
others. 

We recommend therefore, that a committee of 
three similar to our committee, be appointed for 
the year to cooperate in a similar manner with 
the war council of the college. That this com- 
mittee be empowered to continue the work of the 
Service Corps on lines that may seem to promise 
the most satisfactory service, and further that 
this committee be empowered to send a full re- 
port of the work of the Service Corps to the 
Alumnae and former students with an appeal 
for further support. Miss Sergeant has offered 
to edit a report of all the work done by Bryn 
Mawr women abroad including the work of the 
members of the Service Corps. 

Marion Reilly, 
Chairman. 



30 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[April 



REPORT OF FINANCE COMMITTEE 



The finance committee has held five meetings 
during the year, one in New York, one in Phila- 
delphia, and one in Bryn Mawr with the two 
meetings with class collectors, one of these at 
Bryn Mawr in commencement week, and the 
annual luncheon in Philadelphia in January. 

The completion of the Mary Elizabeth 
Garrett Endowment Fund of $100,000 left the 
committee to arrange for the continuance of 
Class Collections at a time when the pressure 
of war work drives was heaviest, and it is a 
definite tribute to the value of class collec- 
tions for the academic endowment of the college 
that these collections amounted in 1918 to 
$10914.38. Five classes increased their efforts 
under the stimulus of reunions, and made 
gifts amounting to $4081.11. The sub-com- 
mittee on publicity has inaugurated its plan 
to give information about the college to all 
alumnae and former students at frequent in- 
tervals. It was hoped to bring out a special 
issue of the Quarterly that would start this 
educational work of publicity, but that not 
being possible the alumnae issue of the College 
News of January 30, 1919, contains much in- 
formation about the college, faculty, and stu- 
dents, that should arouse interest in the col- 
lections of the coming year. 

Publicity Plans 

Mrs. Henry S. Brooks, (Clara Vail '97) 
chairman of the sub-committee on publicity 
reports plans as follows: 

"The publicity work for the year 1919 be- 
gins with several articles in the current number 
of the College News calling attention to what 
the alumnae fund has already done for the 
college and outlining again the needs of the 
college, which the fund should be prepared 
to fill. Following that will come a letter to 
the general Bryn Mawr public calling atten- 
tion to this article. 

"Then the class collectors are to be written 
to, and urged to write their first letters asking 
for money, and mentioning that money collected 
before the next Liberty Loan will be invested 



in Liberty bonds. Later will come an appeal 
for Liberty bonds, at the time of the next issue, 
and then further letters to class collectors, 
keeping them in touch with the finance com- 
mittee and giving them aid, if they require it, 
in getting out their letters." 

May Meet in Deanery 

"An effort is being made to get in touch 
with the local branches and Bryn Mawr clubs, 
so as to provide speakers from Bryn Mawr for 
their annual dinners. President Thomas is 
in sympathy with this publicity work and is pre- 
pared to cooperate with us. She is particu- 
larly anxious to encourage class reunions and 
expects to give reunions the privilege of meet- 
ing at the Deanery, some time during com- 
mencement week. 

"In the course of time, the finance committee 
hopes to have a travelling secretary to assist 
in this work regularly, and futhermore, when 
our funds make it permissable, we hope to have 
some newspaper publicity for the general 
public outside of Bryn Mawr." 

The board of directors of the Alumnae 
Association presented to the directors of the 
college, the deed of gift under which the Mary 
Elizabeth Garrett Endownment Fund will be 
given, and this having been accepted, the in- 
terest amounting to $4000 is being paid over 
at eight times ($500 each time) to the treasurer 
of the college during the year 1918-1919. 
This money has made possible the endowment 
of the chair of English, the money liberated 
has increased the salaries of associate pro- 
fessors and the balance has been divided 
as a special alumnae gift to all full professors 
for the year 1918-1919. 

The finance committee has voted that the 
expenses of the collectors and of all publicity 
work be taken from the. collections, believing 
that by putting the work on a definite business 
basis we shall be able greatly to increase the 
total results of the collections. 

Martha G. Thomas, 
Chairman. 



1919] 



Annual Report of Alumnae Association 



31 



CAROLA WOERISHOFFER MEMORIAL FUND COMMITTEE REPORT 



The income of the Carola Woerishoffer Me- 
morial Fund for 1917 and 1918 (the sum of 
$200) has been given to the Training School of 
the National Women's Trade Union League 
as a contribution towards a New York work- 
ing girl's scholarship. An account of the 
work of the school was given in our report of 
1917. Mabel Leslie, an electrical worker who 
held the scholarship to which we contributed 
in that year, completed her work at the school 
last summer and is now organizing the Chicago 



telephone operators. She was working with 
the New York League for some months last 
fall, at the difficult task of organizing the wom- 
en laundry workers, and the ability she has 
shown as the result of her year's study and 
training has been so marked that the New 
York League is now clamoring for more 
scholarships. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Margaret Franklin, 

Chairman. 



REPORT OF CONFERENCE COMMITTEE 



The conference committee of the Alumnae 
Association met on Wednesday, December 5, 
at 3 o'clock, with representatives of the Under- 
graduate and Graduate Associations in Pem- 
broke West students' sitting room. 

There have been several informal meetings 
also. 

The new cut rule came up for discussion and 
all seemed to think the present system met 
with the approval of both faculty and students. 
No student is expected in one semester to take 
more than eight cuts without some satisfactory 
explanation, but she is allowed six additional 
cuts to cover less serious illness. Finally at 
the dean's office, faculty and student reports 
of cuts are made to agree. 

In the last year new courses have been 
granted, at the request of the students, eco- 
nomic geology, civilian relief, and a history of 
the war of 1914 — other courses were refused, 
one in radium — because of the expensive outlay 
required, and Russian because of the impossi- 
bility of getting a proper instructor. New 
groups now allowed are philosophy and geology, 
and economics and geology. 

At the present time, food which complies 
with conservation rules, may be sold on the 
campus, but for a while no food was sold, on 
the theory that any eating between meals was 
unnecessary and wasteful. 



The new pay-day has proved very successful, 
in doing away with a great deal of canvassing 
from room to room. Under this arrangement 
the students pay certain dues on pre-arranged 
days, and if they do not pay, interest is 
added. 

The musical association which provides 
concerts from time to time, has always had 
financial trouble, but under the present plan, 
money is to be raised by private canvass, 
and when enough is in the treasury, a concert 
will be given with admittance free. 

The bulletin boards have long been a matter 
of concern, and this year some have been en- 
larged, some had tacks added, and the one in 
Taylor Hall, by the chapel door, has been 
replaced by one entirely different. Will the 
alumnae examine this for themselves, as it is 
entirely different from the usual kind? 

In closing, the members of the conference 
hope that hereafter some members of the aca- 
demic committee will meet with them to make 
a more definite connection between the two. 

Also, it is recommended that each year a 
member of last year's graduating class, neces- 
sarily living in or near Philadelphia, be ap- 
pointed to the conference committee, to bring 
closer the older and younger alumnae. 

Gertrude B. Barrows, 

Chairman. 



REPORT OF JAMES E. RHOADS SCHOLARSHIP COMMITTEE 



There were nine candidates for the James E. 
Rhoads Junior Scholarship for 1918-19, and 
twelve candidates for the James E. Rhoads 
Sophomore Scholarship for 1918-19, when the 
committee met in March. 



These candidates were interviewed by the 
alumnae members of the committee and judg- 
ments were obtained from members of the 
faculty as to the quality of their academic work 
and their ability. After a series of meetings 



32 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[April 



and conferences, the alumnae members decided 
to nominate Marie Litzinger with a grade of 
88.38 for the Junior Scholarship for 1918-19, 
and that the James E Rhoads Sophomore 
Scholarship be divided between two non- 
resident students. Beatrice Norah Spinelli: 
grade 84.857 who should be given a scholarship 
worth $150 and Mary Henry Macdonald, 
grade: 84.357 who should be given a scholarship 
worth $100. 

These nominations were made at the 22nd 
annual meeting of the committee, held in the 
President's office on Tuesday, April 9. The 
committee consisted of President Thomas; 
Professor William B. Huff; and Professors 
Arthur L. Wheeler, representing the faculty; 
Miss A. H. Todd, chairman, Mrs William A. 
Collins and Mrs William Roy Smith repre- 
senting the alumnae association. Dean Taft 
was present by request. 

The candidates nominated by the alumnae 
members were accepted by the committee for 
nomination to the board of trustees. 

On Tuesday, April 30, President Thomas 
asked the James E. Rhoads Committee to meet 
with the faculty committee for undergraduate 
scholarships. President Thomas informed the 
committee that the faculty committee on 
scholarships had conferred the Hinchman prize 
of $500.00 on Marie Litzinger for excellence 
in scholarship in her group subjects. The case 
was without precedent as the Hinchman prize 



had not been awarded before. As Miss Litz- 
inger's expenses for the year were provided for, 
and as she did not present "financial needs" in 
accordance with the terms of the deed of gift of 
the James E. Rhoads Scholarship it was decided 
to transfer the James E. Rhoads Scholarship for 
1918-19 to Miss Arlene F. Preston, grade 81.966. 

The recommendation of the James E. Rhoads 
committee requires action by the alumnae 
association. At the annual meeting of the 
committee, the alumnae and faculty members 
discussed at considerable length the desirability 
and advisability of increasing the amount of 
the James E. Rhoads Scholarship in view of 
the increase in college expenses. 

The opinion was expressed that as these 
scholarships are conferred for excellence of 
academic work as well as financial need, they 
are essentially college honors, and that by 
making them more valuable, they act at once 
as a spur to sound scholarship and as a reward. 

After discussion it was passed unanimously: 
"that it is the sense of this committee that in 
view of the general increase in the cost of living, 
it would be desirable to have the Alumnae 
Association of Bryn Mawr College consider the 
possibility of increasing the James E. Rhoads 
Scholarships by $50 each." 

Respectfully submitted, 

Marion Parris Smith, 

Chairman. 



REPORT OF STUDENTS LOAN FUND COMMITTEE 



The Students Loan Fund Committee met on 
May 21, 1918, and authorized loans to eight 
students, amounting to $1130 for the year 
1918-1919. Loans have been returned by 13 
alumnae amounting to $1643. 19 alumnae have 
paid interest on loans, this has amounted to 
$119.51. 



The Class of 1918 made the usual gift of $100 
to the Fund. This graduation gift was inaug- 
urated by the Class of 1907 and makes a very 
much appreciated increase to the Fund. The 
details of the Fund are to be found in the Treas- 
urer's report. Martha E. Thomas, 

Secretary. 



REPORTS FROM CLUBS AND BRANCHES 



NEW YORK BRANCH 

The activities of the New York Branch have, 
during this year, increased in some directions 
and decreased in others. 

The Intercollegiate Bureau of Occupations to 
which the Branch has always contributed, has 
been taken over by the government as a part 
of the United States employment service. 



Most of the staff of the Bureau remains, under 
the new regime, but the control and manage- 
ment have been assumed by the government. 
The affiliation of the Colleges with the Bureau 
has, therefore, ceased. 

Adrienne Kenyon Franklin (Mrs. Benjamin 
Franklin, Jr.) our representative to the College 
Settlement, reports that she has on hand $180 
of the $250 necessary for the joint Carola 



1919] 



Reports from Clubs and Branches 



33 



Woerishoffer Fellowship. We are informed 
that Bryn Mawr is the only College that has 
not an established means of raising this fund. 
It is hoped that the Alumnae Association will 
consider some way of dividing the amount to 
be raised each year, among branches and com- 
mittees. 

Our War Service committee with Mrs. 
Edward E. Loomis as chairman, has accom- 
plished a tremendous amount. The committee 
has met with, or corresponded with, fourteen 
other organizations engaged in warwork. This 
list includes the Women's Liberty Loan com- 
mittee, the Mayor's committee of Women, 
the Women's Land Army, the committee on 
Public Information, and many others. 

Last January at the request of the National 
War Savings committee, a booth for the sale of 
War Savings Stamps was maintained at the 
Motor Boat Show for a week. In March the 
Committee was asked by the New York Public 
Library to help in the campaign for gift books 
for the soldiers and sailors, Barbara Spofford 
Morgan (Mrs. Shepard Morgan) and Louise 
Fleischmann districted the east side of the city, 
and collected a very large number of books. 
In April funds were solicited for the Bryn Mawr 
Service Corps by means of personal letters 
written to each member of the branch by one 
of her classmates. A second appeal was sent 
out in November. 

In the work for the Liberty Loans the Com- 
mittee was assisted by Elizabeth Taylor Russell 
of the Trades Committee of the Women's 
Liberty Loan Committee. At her suggestion 
nine volunteers, with assistants of their own 
choosing, took over Loan booths in twelve Tea 
Rooms. They collected $35,300 in subscrip- 
tions to the Third Liberty Loan. 

The Saturday afternoon entertainments in 
Y. M. C. A. recreation huts at Camp Upton, 
undertaken by a committee of representatives 
of the Women's College Clubs of New York, 
with Louise Fleischmann as chairman, were con- 
tinued throughout the winter, with great success. 

The possibility of service in the new military 
hospitals of the city has long been under inves- 
tigation by Miss Florence King. The eventual 
decision of the authorities however, was against 
the use of such untrained volunteers as the 
committee could supply. 

Other activities were constantly being carried 
on through the year, and when one considers 
the fact that each member of the committee 
did her part in addition to war work or profes- 



sional work previously undertaken, the results 
accomplished seem most creditable. 

At the suggestion of the executive committee, 
the War Service committee will be dissolved at 
the annual meeting, since its work is over. 
The branch is under a great obligation toMrs. 
Loomis who served so ably as chairman. 

The work at Camp Upton will be continued 
by a new committee with Louise Fleischmann 
as chairman. We are already indebted to Miss 
Fleischmann, who has given so much time and 
thought to the work at Camp Upton, and also 
to Dagmar Perkins, who has assumed a large 
part of the burden of the entertainments for 
the Bryn Mawr Saturdays. 

Our annual meeting will be held on Saturday, 
January 25. The branch is fortunate in that 
Frances Browne has accepted the nomination 
for chairman for the coming year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Katharine G. Ecob, 

Chairman. 

BOSTON CLUB 

The Bryn Mawr Club of Boston has no 
special activities to report for the winter. The 
Club voted last spring to economize by not 
renting a room for the year, as we have done 
before, but to hold the meetings in a room 
rented for the monthly meetings from the 
College Club, at 40 Commonwealth Avenue. 
This has enabled us to reduce our dues and the 
arrangement has seemed very satisfactory so 
far. 

The meetings have been merely social in 
character, as most of the members have been 
too much involved in war-work to undertake 
anything more. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Sylvia Lee. 

BALTIMORE CLUB 

The Baltimore Bryn Mawr College Club is 
first of all a social club which consists of busy 
people who are anxious to gather together in- 
formally about every month, without a serious 
motive necessarily. The club is thus able to 
keep in touch with the various members, and 
indirectly with the state of affairs at college. 

Occasionally the meetings are addressed by 
members who are doing interesting work in 
Baltimore; sometimes letters are read from 
those of us who are abroad doing Red Cross 



34 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[April 



work, or Y. M. C. A., and at the January meet- 
ing of the Club Ellen Kilpatrick and Alice 
Miller, who have just returned from over seas 
canteen work, spoke. 

The Club has contributed to the BrynMawr 
Service Corps, and this winter has raised a 
small emergency fund which was given to Amy 
Steiner to use in her work abroad this year. 
Miss Steiner is a member of our college club, 
and has just sailed for France to work in the 
Y. M. C. A. 

The new election of officers will take place at 
the next meeting of the club. 

Helen W. Irwin, 

President. 

BRYN MAWR CLUB OF PITTSBURGH 

President: Mary Breed, Westminster Place 
at Aiken Avenue. 

Vice-President: Sara Ellis, 4860 Ellsworth 
Avenue. 

Secretary: Henrietta F. Magoffin, 800 Aiken 
Avenue. 

Treasurer: Minnie K. List (Mrs. Frederick 
B. Chalfant), 739 N. Beatty Street. 

Membership: Twenty-nine. Average attend- 
ance of eight to ten. 

Meetings: Monthly teas at homes of various 
members. 

War Service: One abroad with reconstruction 
unit; one in Army Nurses Training Corps; six 



in United States Government service. All 
interested in volunteer patriotic service of 
various kinds. 

Activities: French orphan supported through 
the fatherless children of France committee. 

An annual scholarship is offered to the appli- 
cant from Allegheny County who makes the 
highest record in her entrance examinations, 
definite application through the club scholar- 
ship committee being necessary. 

The club assumes the responsibility of cloth- 
ing an orphan from the local Juvenile Court 
who is cared for in a private family. 

The Bryn Mawr Club of Pittsburgh owns 
four fifty dollars, 4| per cent Liberty Bonds. 
Respectfully submitted 

Mary Bidwell Breed, 

President. 
Henrietta F. Magoffin, 

Secretary. 

OHIO BRYN MAWR CLUB 

On account of the war work that was demand- 
ing the time of many members of the club, it 
seemed wise to omit the annual state meeting 
of the Ohio Bryn Mawr club. On April 14, 
1918 Marion Reilly spoke to the Cincinnati 
members on The Bryn Mawr Service Corps. 
No other meetings have been held. 

Grace Latimer Jones, 
President. 



ANNUAL REPORT OF "THE QUARTERLY" 



Reconstruction is the problem before The 
Quarterly as before the world. During 
the last year of the war, The Quarterly suf- 
fered severely. The most that can be said 
is that all four issues were in the hands of 
the subscribers before the end of the year. 
Aside from the change of editors, the chief 
difficulties were the lack of printers, the high 
cost of paper, the new postal regulations and 
the lateness of the mail. 

One step of great importance to the future 
welfare of The Quarterly has already been 
taken. The board of directors has authorized 
the purchase of an addressograph. The list 
of subscribers and advertisers has been pre- 
pared and all things point to the use of the 
new machine for the April issue. The addresso- 
graph will cost $47.50, the plates $60, making 
a total of $107.50. The cost of having the 



work done by hand is about $14 an issue, so 
that the machine will pay for itself in two 
years. Moreover the addressograph does work 
in two hours which takes more than a week to 
do by hand. The addressograph will be kept 
in the alumnae room here at Bryn Mawr and, 
will be used by the secretary and treasurer of 
the association as well as by The Quarterly. 

The number of subscribers has reached 
1891, of which 15 are not members of the 
association, 11 are advertisers and 17 are 
complementary. 

Elizabeth Brakeley '16 has resigned as 
business manager. The problem of reorgani- 
zing this department on a paying basis is now 
under consideration and the possibility of 
putting the advertising into the hands of a 
professional, perhaps an alumnae, for a com- 
mission is being investigated. 



1919] 



By-Laws 



35 



The fundamental problem facing the 
association so far as The Quarterly is con- 
cerned is difficult. The alumnae want news 
of the college and of their friends. They 
expect to find it in The Quarterly but they 
do not and indeed it is impossible that they 
should. 

For this is the way things happen. The 
editor receives today a bit of live news of 
great interest to all the alumnae. She holds 
it carefully until the April issue is out. By 
that time, The College News has printed it, 
months have passed and the news is no longer 
news. 

As a solution to the problem it is suggested 
that we try to put the news into The College 
News and ask the alumnae to look for it there, 
looking to The Quarterly for something 
else, for matters of record, for biographical 
sketches, reviews of books, descriptions of 
travels, letters, poetry, editorials, anything 
but news. 

How cordially the News has greeted this 
proposal is seen in their offer of this week's 
News as an alumnae number. 

Hurriedly, literally over-night, a scrub team 
edited the News which you have all seen 



today. I am sure the association wishes to 
thank the News board for its generosity. 

Would it appeal to the alumnae to enter a 
business relation with the News to take over 
the midyear and finals numbers as two issues 
of The Quarterly? 

The two regular numbers of The Quarterly 
could then be made thick, full of interesting 
articles and alumnae association business. The 
news numbers could be edited by a special 
board of alumnae who came to the alumnae 
meeting or reunion a week early and could 
give a lively account of the lastest campus 
and alumnae doings. 

The News editors say they have always 
wanted to get more alumnae notes. They 
would, I feel sure, welcome a regular weekly 
alumnae correspondence. 

I would be very glad if the association would 
consider these problems of reconstruction at 
this meeting in order that The Quarterly 
may be brought to peace time usefulness as 
soon as possible. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Isabel Foster, 

Editor. 



BY-LAWS 



Article I 



Article II 



MEMBERSHIP 

Section 1. Any person who has received the degree 
of Bachelor of Arts or of Doctor of Philosophy from Bryn 
Mawr College is entitled to full membership in the Alumnae 
Association of Bryn Mawr College, and to all privileges 
pertaining to such membership. 

Sec. 2. Former students of the College who have not 
received degrees may become Associate Members of the 
Alumnae Association upon unanimous election by the 
Board of Directors. Applications for associate member- 
ship must be made to the Board of Directors at least two 
months before the annual meeting, and the names of the 
applicants elected by the Board of Directors must be 
presented at this meeting. 

To be eligible for associate membership a former stu- 
dent must have pursued courses in the College for at least 
two consecutive semesters, and if a matriculated student, 
at least four academic years must have elapsed since the 
date of her entering the College. A return to the College 
for undergraduate work shall terminate an associate 
membership, and render the student ineligible for re- 
election during the period of this new attendance at the 
College. 

Associate members are entitled to all the rights and 
privileges of full membership, except the power of voting 
and the right to hold office in the Board of Directors, or to 
serve on standing committees. 



Section 1. There shall be each year one regular meet- 
ing of the Association. This meeting shall be held at 
Bryn Mawr College, on a date to be fixed annually by the 
Board of Directors, preferably the Saturday of the mid- 
year recess. 

Sec. 2. Two weeks before the annual meeting notices 
of the date and of the business to be brought before the 
meeting shall be sent to each member of the Alumnae 
Association. If it should be necessary to bring before the 
meeting business of which no previous notice could be 
given, action may be taken upon such business only by a 
two-thirds vote of the members present at the meeting. 

Sec. 3. Special meetings of the Association may be 
called at any time by the Corresponding Secretary at the 
request of the President, or of five members of the Associ- 
ation, provided that notice of the meeting and of all busi - 
ness to be brought before it be sent to each member of 
the Association two weeks in advance. 

Sec. 4. In cases demanding immediate action on 
matters clearly not affecting the financial or general policy 
of the Association, special meetings may be called by the 
Corresponding Secretary with less than two weeks' notice 
at the request of the Board of Directors or of ten members 
of the Association. At special meetings called on less 
than two weeks' notice action may be taken only by a 
two-thirds vote of the members present. 

Sec. 5. Fifteen members of the Association shall con- 
stitute a quorum for the transaction of business. 



36 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[April 



Article III. 

MANAGEMENT 

Section 1. The Officers of the Association shall con- 
stitute a Board of Directors, to which shall be entrusted 
the management of the affairs of the Association in the 
interim of its meetings. 

Article IV 

DUES 

Section 1. The annual dues for each member of the 
Association shall be two dollars payable to the Treasurer 
at the annual meeting. Associate members shall pay the 
same dues as full members of the Association, but shall be 
exempt from all assessments. 

Sec. 2. The dues for each member that enters the 
Association in June shall be one dollar for the part year 
from June to the following February, payable to the 
Treasurer on graduation from the College. 

Sec. 3. Any member of the Association may become a 
life member of the Association upon payment at any time 
of forty dollars; and upon such payment she shall become 
exempt from all annual dues and assessments. 

Sec. 4. The names of members who fail to pay the 
annual dues for four successive years shall be stricken 
from the membership list. The Board of Directors may 
at its discretion remit the dues of any member sub silentio. 

Article V 
branch organizations 

Section 1. Any 25 or more members of the Bryn 
Mawr College Alumnae Association may form a local 
branch, the geographical limits to be submitted to the 
Board of Directors of the Alumnae Association and to be 
approved by the Board of Directors. 

Sec. 2. Any alumna or former student of Bryn Mawr 
College who is eligible to membership in the Bryn Mawr 
College Alumnae Association may be a member of a Branch 
Organization. 

fe'jSEC. 3. Every Branch Organization shall report to 
The Alumnae Association at the annual meeting. 

Article VI 
committees 

Section 1. There shall be two Alumnae members of 
the Board of Directors of Bryn Mawr College in accord- 
ance with the by-laws of the Trustees of Bryn Mawr 
College. 

Sec. 2. The Standing Committees of the Association 
shall be: an Academic Committee, consisting of seven 
members; a Conference Committee, consisting of four 
members; a Students' Loan Fund Committee, consisting 
of five members; a James E. Rhoads Scholarships Com- 
mittee, consisting of three members; a Nominating Com- 
mittee, consisting of five members; a Finance Committee, 
consisting of three members and the Treasurer ex officio; 
and a Committee on Athletics, consisting of five members. 

Article VII 
elections and appointments 

Section 1. Elections for Officers shall be held bienni- 
ally and elections for members of the Academic Committee 
annually, before the regular meeting, and the results of the 



elections shall be announced at that meeting; in every 
case the candidate receiving the greatest number of votes 
shall be declared elected. No ballot shall be valid that 
is not returned in a sealed envelope marked " Ballot." 

Sec. 2 . The elections for the nomination of an Alumnae 
Director shall be held every three years on the last Thurs- 
day in May. No ballot shall be valid that is not signed 
and returned in a sealed envelope marked "Ballot." The 
alumna receiving the highest number of votes shall be 
nominated to the Trustees for the office of Alumnae Di- 
rector. At the first election in the year 1906, and at 
other elections when there is a vacancy to be filled, the 
alumna receiving the highest number of votes shall be 
nominated to the Trustees for the regular term of six 
years, and the alumna receiving the second highest number 
of votes for the term of three years. 

Sec. 3. The Officers of the Association shall be nomi- 
nated by the Nominating Committee, and elected by ballot 
of the whole Association. They shall hold office for two 
years or until others are elected in their places. The 
Board of Directors shall have power to fill any vacancy in 
its own body for an unexpired term. 

Sec. 4. The members of the Academic Committee 
shall be nominated as follows: The Board of Directors shall 
make at least twice as many nominations as there are 
vacancies in the Committee. Furthermore, any twenty- 
five alumnae may nominate one candidate for any vacancy 
in the Committee; provided that they sign the nomination 
and file it with the Recording Secretary by December 1, 
preceding the annual meetings. The members of the 
Academic Committee shall be elected by ballot of the 
whole Association and shall each hold office for four years 
or until others are elected in their places. The Board of 
Directors shall have power to fill any vacancy in the 
Committee, such appointment to hold until the next 
regular election. 

Sec. 5. (a) The Alumnae Directors shall be nomi- 
nated as follows: The Board of Directors of the Alumnae 
Association shall make at least three times as many nomi- 
nations as there are vacancies among the Alumnae Di- 
rectors. It may at its discretion include in such nomina- 
tions names proposed in writing by any 25 members of 
the Alumnae Association qualified to vote for Alumnae 
Directors. 

(b) Every Bachelor of Arts or Doctor of Philosophy of 
Bryn Mawr College shall be qualified to vote for Alumnae 
Directors, provided that at least five years shall have 
elapsed since the Bachelor's degree was conferred upon 
her, and provided that she shall have paid her dues up to 
and including the current year. 

(c) Every Bachelor of Arts or Doctor of Philosophy 
shall be eligible for the office of Alumnae Director, pro- 
vided that at least five years shall have elapsed since the 
Bachelor's degree was conferred upon her, and provided 
that she is not at the time of nomination or during her 
term of office a member or the wife of a member of the staff 
of Bryn Mawr College, nor a member of the staff of any 
other college. 

(d) An Alumnae Director shall serve for six years or so 
much thereof as she may continue to be eligible. When 
ever a vacancy shall occur among the Alumnae Directors 
a nomination for such vacancy shall be made by the Board 
of Directors of the Alumnae Association to the Trustees. 
An Alumnae Director so nominated shall hold her office 
until her successor has been voted for at the next regular 
election for Alumnae Director and duly elected by the 
Trustees. 

(e) In case by reason of a tie it should be uncertain 
which alumna has received the nomination of the Alumnae 



1919] 



By-Laws 



37 



Association for Alumnae Director, the Board of Directors 
of the Alumnae Association shall nominate to the Trustees 
one of the two candidates receiving an equal number of 
votes. 

Sec. 6. The members of the Conference Committee 
shall be appointed annually by the Board of Directors 
and shall each hold office for one year or until others are 
appointed in their places. 

Sec. 7. The members of the Students' Loan Fund 
Committee shall be appointed by the Board of Directors 
from candidates recommended by the Loan Fund Com- 
mittee. They shall each hold office for five years or until 
others are appointed in their places. One new member 
shall be appointed each year to succeed the retiring mem- 
ber, and no member, with the exception of the Treasurer, 
shall be eligible for re-election until one year has elapsed 
after the expiration of her term of office. 

Sec. 8. The members of the James E. Rhoads Scholar- 
ships Committee shall be appointed by the Board of 
Directors, and shall each hold office for three years, or until 
others are appointed in their places. One new member 
shall be appointed each year to succeed the retiring mem- 
ber, and no member shall be eligible for re-election until 
one year has elapsed after the expiration of her term of 
office. 

Sec. 9. The Health Statistics Committee shall be a 
permanent committee, appointed by the Board of Direc- 
tors in consultation with the President of Bryn Mawr 
College. The Chairman of this Committee is empowered 
to fill vacancies in the Committee; a vacancy in the chair- 
manship shall be filled by the Board of Directors in con- 
sultation with the President of Bryn Mawr College. 

Sec. 10. The members of the Nominating Committee 
shall be appointed biennially by the Board of Directors, 
and shall each hold office for four years, or until others are 
appointed in their places. Two members of the Com- 
mittee shall be appointed in the year preceding an election 
for officers, and three members in the year preceding the 
next election for officers, and thereafter in the same order 
before alternate elections. 

Sec. 11. The members of the Finance Committee shall 
be appointed by the Board of Directors and shall each 
hold office for four years, or until others are appointed 
in their places. 

Sec. 12. The members of the Committee on Athletics 
shall be appointed by the Board of Directors and shall 
each hold office for five years, or until others are appointed 
in their places. One new member shall be appointed each 
year to succeed the retiring member. 

Sec. 13. The appointments of the Board of Directors 
for the year ensuing shall be made in time to be reported 
by the Board to the annual meeting for ratification by the 
Association. 

Article VIII 



Section 1. The President shall preside at all meetings 
of the Association and of the Board of Directors, and 
shall perform such other duties as regularly pertain to her 
office. She shall be a member ex officio of all the commit- 
tees of the Association and shall countersign all vouchers 
drawn by the Treasurer before they are paid. She shall 
appoint such committees as are not otherwise provided for. 

Sec. 2. The Vice-President shall perform all the duties 
of the President in the absence of the latter. 

Sec. 3. The Recording Secretary shall keep the min- 
utes of the Association and of the Board of Directors, 
and shall perform such other duties as regularly pertain 



to the office of clerk. She shall have the custody of all 
documents and records belonging to the Association which 
do not pertain to special or standing committees, and she 
shall be the custodian of the seal of the Association. She 
shall notify committees of all motions in any way affecting 
them; she shall receive all ballots cast for the elections, and 
with the Chairman of the Nominating Committee shall 
act as teller for the same; and she shall be responsible for 
the publication of the Annual Report, which should be 
mailed to the Alumnae within two months after the annual 
meeting. 

Sec. 4. The Corresponding Secretary shall conduct all 
the necessary correspondence of the Association; she shall 
send out all notices, and shall inform officers and com- 
mittees of their election or appointment. 

Sec. 5. The Treasurer shall be the custodian of all 
funds of the Association and shall pay them out only by 
vouchers countersigned by the President; she shall collect 
all dues and assessments, shall file vouchers for all dis- 
bursements, and shall keep an account of all receipts and 
expenditures. She shall report on the finances of the 
Association when called upon, to the Association or to 
the Board of Directors, and she shall make to the Associa- 
tion at the annual meeting a full report, the correctness 
of which must be attested by a certified public accountant. 

Sec. 6. The Board of Directors shall prepare all busi- 
ness for the meetings of the Association, and shall have 
full power to transact in the interim of its meetings all 
business not otherwise provided for in these by-laws. 
It shall have control of all funds of the Association; it 
shall supervise the expenditures of committees, and it 
shall have power to levy assessments not exceeding in any 
one year the amount of the annual dues. At least one 
month before each annual meeting it shall send to each 
member of the Association a ballot presenting nominations 
for the Academic Committee in accordance with Art. VI, 
Sec. 4; biennially, at least one month before the annual 
meeting, it shall send to each member of the Association 
the ballot prepared by the Nominating Committee in 
accordance with Art. VII, Sec. 13. Every three years, at 
least one month before the last Thursday in May, it shall 
send to each member of the Association qualified to vote 
for Alumnae Directors a ballot presenting nominations for 
Alumnae Directors in accordance with Art. VI, Sec. 5. 
Through the President and Recording Secretary, it shall 
certify to the Trustees the names of persons voted for and 
the number of votes received for each person in elections 
for Alumnae Directors. It shall appoint before each an- 
nual meeting the members of the Conference Committee, 
and fill such vacancies on the Students' Loan Fund Com- 
mittee. The James E. Rhoads Scholarships Committee, 
the Finance Committee, and the Committee on Athletics, 
as may be necessary by reason of expiration of terms of 
office. It shall also appoint, in alternate years before the 
regular meeting preceding the biennial election, the mem- 
bers of the Nominating Committee; and in case a vacancy 
occurs it shall appoint, in consultation with the President 
of Bryn Mawr College, the chairman of the Health Statis- 
tics Committee. It shall report all appointments to the 
regular meeting next following for ratification by the Asso- 
ciation. A majority of the Board shall constitute a quo- 
rum for the transaction of business. The Board of 
Directors shall be at all times responsible to the Association. 

Sec. 7. The Academic Committee shall hold at least 
one meeting each academic year to confer with the Presi- 
dent of Bryn Mawr College on matters of interest con- 
nected with the College. It shall have full power to 
arrange the times of its meetings. 



38 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[April 



Sec. 8. The Alumnae members of the Board of Direc- 
tors of Bryn Mawr College shall perform such duties as 
are prescribed by the laws of the Trustees and Directors 
of Bryn Mawr College. 

Sec. 9. The Conference Committee shall hold at least 
two meetings each academic year, one in the autumn and 
one in the spring, to confer with committees from the 
Undergraduate Association and the Graduate Club at 
Bryn Mawr College, on matters of interest to the three 
associations. It shall have power to call special meetings 
at its discretion. 

Sec. 10. The Students' Loan Fund Committee shall 
have immediate charge of the Loan Fund, and its disburse- 
ments, subject to the approval of the Board of Directors. 
It shall confer with the President of Bryn Mawr College 
regarding all loans. 

Sec. 11. The James E. Rhoades Scholarships Com- 
mittee shall, with the president of Bryn Mawr College and 
the Committee appointed by the Academic Council of the 
Faculty, nominate annually the candidates for the James 
E. Rhoads Scholarships to be conferred by The Board of 
Trustees of Bryn Mawr College according to the provisions 
contained in the Deed of Gift. 

Sec. 12. The Health Statistics Committee shall collect 
from the members of the Association information that 
may serve as a basis for statistics regarding the health 
and occupation of college women. The Committee, sub- 
ject to the approval of the Board of Directors, shall have 
power to determine the best methods of carrying out the 
duties assigned to it. 

Sec. 13. The Nominating Committee shall biennially 
prepare a ballot presenting alternate nominations for the 
officers of the Association and shall file it with the Record- 
ing Secretary by December 1 preceding the annual meeting. 

Sec. 14. The Finance Committee may, with the ap- 
proval of the Board of Directors of the Alumnae Associ- 
ation, indicate purposes for which money shall be raised 



by the Alumnae Association. It shall devise ways and 
means, and take charge of collecting moneys for such 
purposes, and when authorized by the Alumnae Associ- 
ation shall prepare, subject to the approval of the Board of 
Directors, the necessary agreements for the transfer of 
gifts from the Alumnae Association. All collections from 
the Alumnae Association shall be subject to its super- 
vision. The Finance Committee shall have power to 
add to its number. 

Sec. 15. The Committee on Athletics shall try to 
stimulate an interest in athletics among the members of 
the Alumnae Association, and shall take official charge of 
all contests that are participated in by both alumnae and 
undergraduates. 

Sec. 16. The Board of Directors and all Committees 
shall report to the Association at the annual meeting, and 
the Students' Loan Fund Committee shall report also to 
the Board of Trustees of Bryn Mawr College. 

Article IX 

RULES OF ORDER 

The rules of parliamentary practices as set forth in 
Roberts' "Rules of Order" shall govern the proceedings 
of this Association in so far as they are not inconsistent 
with any provisions of its charter or by-laws. 

Article X 

AMENDMENT OF BY-LAWS 

These by-laws may be amended or new ones framed by 
a two-thirds vote of the members present at any regular 
meeting of the association, provided that details of pro- 
posed amendments and additions have been given in 
writing at a previous regular meeting of the Association, 
either by the Board of Directors or by five members of the 
Association. 



IN MEMORIAM 



ADELAIDE R. EVANS PERKINS 



ANNABELLA ELLIOTT RICHARDS 



Adelaide R. Evans Perkins, '06 (Mrs. 
Clarence Perkins), died on December 17, 
1918 after an illness of only twelve days. 

Mrs. Perkins leaves her husband and a two 
year old daughter, Dorothy Ellen Perkins, 
who has been very close to death from pneu- 
monia. She is also survived by her father, 
J. N. Evans, now of Columbus, Ohio; by two 
sisters, Miss Anne M. Evans, Vassar 1906, 
who is executive secretary for Civilian Re- 
lief with the American Red Cross in Columbus 
Ohio, and Miss Dorothy M. Evans, ex-1915 
Bryn Mawr College (A. B. 1915, State Uni- 
versity of Missouri), who is chief technician 
in laboratory, U. S. Army General Hospital 
No. 18, Waynesville, North Carolina; and by 
one brother, Noble W. Evans, 16th Machine 
Gun Battalion, A. E. F., France. 



Annabella Ellicott Richards of the class of 
1907, died in Baltimore, February 8, of 
pneumonia. 

She prepared for college at Miss Hill's 
School, Philadelphia. 

In 1908 she returned to Bryn Mawr as 
Graduate Scholar in Chemistry and con- 
tinued her work as a graduate student until 
1911. In 1910-1911 she taught Physiology 
in the Girls' High School, Philadelphia, and 
in 1911-12 she was Assistant in Chemistry 
at Barnard College. From 1912-14 she was a 
graduate student of Chemistry at the Johns 
Hopkins University and received the degree 
of Doctor of Philosophy in 1914. From 1914- 
1915 she was assistant in the Department of 
Chemistry in the Johns Hopkins Medical 
School, and from 1915-17 she was Demon- 



1919] 



War Work 



39 



strator of chemistry and Assistant in Clinical 
Pathology in the Women's Medical College 
of Pennsylvania. 

In 1917-18 she again returned to Bryn 
Mawr as Instructor in Bio-Chemistry. At 
the time of her death she was an instructor in 
Chemistry in the Johns Hopkins Medical 
School. 

Her early death has brought to a close a 
career that was full of great promise. She 



had already done some very fundamental 
research in chemistry, her work in the chem- 
istry of nucleic acid being the initial research 
in one of the three phases through which the 
chemistry of the all nucieics has been elabor- 
ated. The quality of her scientific work 
ranked her always with those who seek for 
truth. 

She was an ever sympathetic friend and 
an enthusiastic and inspiring teacher. 



WAR WORK 



BRYN MAWR IN FRANCE 

Shirley Putnam '09, Red Cross searcher 
abroad, who spoke here in November, and 
Catherine Elwood '15, who for the past year, 
has been volunteer secretary to the Ameri- 
can Fund for French Wounded in Paris, have 
both written of their work to the Service 
Corps Committee. 

"I did not return as a Red Cross searcher 
as I expected to do," writes Miss Putnam, "but 
as secretary to my father, who is 'General 
Director of the Library War Service of the 
American Library Association,' and as an 
eventual overseas worker in the Library War 
Service itself. . . . 

"I saw two Bryn Mawr people in Paris, 
Mary Hoyt, who is sticking to her post as 
Nurses' Aid at Neuilly until the hospital 
closes down, and Mary Tongue '13, who, for 
that day or two, was in charge of the head- 
quarters of the Red Cross Canteen Service. 
Eleanor Dulles '17 has just written me glow- 
ingly of their little resurrected village of 60 
souls near Epernay, where she, M. Scatter- 
good '17, G. Lounsbury '98 and others of a 
Quaker Unit are trying to supply wherewithal 
to the returned refugees. I know that Eleanor 
is one of the Bryn Mawr people who does 
keep in touch with college, but perhaps she's 
been too busy to write about this latest job 
of hers. 

"Would it be amiss to quote you from her 
letter, written January 18th? 'Our chief 
enterprise is a store in which we sell what 
they cannot get here for love or money, 
at far below cost price. If we had more money 
we could do so much more, which is so obvious 
that I should not say it. We are trying to 
sell them rabbits and chickens cheap, and 
we are giving out some clothing, and help of 



special kinds in little ways. It is thrilling 
work, and is just the spirit I love to work 
in." 

Elizabeth S. Sergeant '03 has been in the 
hospital in Paris ever since that grenade ac- 
cident, which injured both ankles, one quite 
badly." 

Reunion at Paris Restaurant 

Catherine Elwood writes from the Ro- 
chambeau on her way back to the old secre- 
tarial position with Mrs. Lathrop, president 
of the American Fund for French Wounded: 

"Enid Dessau '15 [sister to D. Dessau '22], 
who had taken my position, has just been sent 
to the invaded regions near Alsace. 

"One amusing evening Helen Chase '16 
and I were dining in a little Bohemian restaur- 
ant on the Bd. Montparnasse, and looking 
about us we discovered nine Bryn Mawr girls, 
every class from 1918 to 1911 being repre- 
sented, and practically every organization 
(American) working in France — save the 
Salvation Army! Henriette's, as the res- 
taurant was called, was soon transformed into 
the College Tea Room, much to the bewilder- 
ment of a few lost and long-haired French 
students, who must have thought Bedlam 
had walked to Montparnasse. . . . 

"Esther Pugh '15, of Philadelphia, is on 
the boat with me and expects to join Susan 
Nichols at Cannes, both working with the 
French Red Cross."— The College News. 

ALUMNA STUDIES SIBERIAN NEEDS 

Michi Kawai, 1904, National Secretary of 
the Y. W. C. A. in Tokio describes her trip 
early this winter to investigate the possibility 
of Japanese women helping in Siberia in the 



40 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[April 



following story which appeared in The Japan 
Advertiser, published at Tokio, December 1, 
1918: 

"It takes only two days and a half to get 
to Vladivostok from Tokio. Our passage 
was very smooth and on the boat we met 
several American men and women who were 
going for the Red Cross and the Y. M. 
C. A 

"It was a kaleidoscopic confusion which 
I saw on the wharf; soldiers of the allied armies, 
Chinese and Korean coolies, women who 
looked like refugees, Japanese women in their 
native costumes, huge Russian drivers, and 
very neat Czech soldiers alongside the Ameri- 
can men in their Red Cross uniforms. Every 
one was shouting, and I was almost afraid 
when our chauffeur drove our huge Red Cross 
car through that motley crowd. . . . 

American Workers 

"I was very much impressed with the ex- 
tensive activity of the American Red Cross. 
They had their autos, their chauffeurs who 
could speak several languages, and they had 
Russians and Serbians working for them. 
They had visiting nurses and physicians to 
take charge of the sick refugees, and persons 
to look after the daily distribution of food. 
The workers were concentrating their minds 
on their share of the responsibility all day 
long, and yet they were not without recrea- 
tion. They seemed to be invited out often 
and, now and then, if their time permitted, 
they had an automobile ride. Were it not 
for this outlet, I think they would break down 
under the strain. Every worker looked very- 
well, and they said the climate in Vladivostok 
was fine. 

"The Y. M. C. A. Hut was a liberal educa- 
tion to me. The majority of the soldiers 
are Americans and Czechs. Very seldom 
one sees a Japanese soldier. The reason 
is, that the Japanese soldiers have much 
guard duty and many of them are in the in- 
terior, and Japanese officers try to keep the 
soldiers within the Compound of the Bar- 
racks. 

On the other hand, American soldiers are 
everywhere and their numbers make them 
conspicuous. They are fine fellows and their 
reputations are without blemish. Naturally, 



a Y. M. C. A. Hut has a very clean, bright 
atmosphere and there I met several American 
missionaries who had come over from China 
and Japan. The Japanese Y. M. C. A. at 
that time could not do any active work be- 
cause of lack of funds in Japan, but they are 
now ready to send over twenty workers, and 
their work in barracks and in cooperation 
with the International Y. M. C. A. will begin. 

In Tropic Siberia 

At the Army Headquarters I was asked 
whether my visit to Siberia was limited to 
Vladivostok. To which I answered that 
if I were not in the way, I wanted to go as 
far as I could. One of the generals smiled, 
and said "Certainly women folk are really 
in the way, but if you care to go, we will ar- 
range a place for you in the special car which 
will take General Otani to Habarovsk, which 
is about 600 miles north of Vladivostok. 

Two days later we two Japanese women 
were the only women in the whole car which 
carried the General and his staff, newspaper 
reporters, a Buddhist priest and several in- 
terpreters. As the double windows were 
shut very tight and steam heat at its highest 
temperature, we were parboiled or steamed 
in the compartment. Many a time I asked 
the porter by gesture to open the window. 
He would answer with his hands that the 
air was very cold outside and that it was a 
waste to send out the comfortable warm air 
outside, to heat the Siberian fields. Seldom 
have I suffered as much from heat. At last 
we got a tumbler full of water and sprinkled 
it in the compartment in order to get some 
moist air. We had the unusual experience 
of having a tropical climate in the late autumn 
in Siberia. Wherever the car stopped, there 
were Japanese soldiers to greet the general, 
behind them a few scattered allied soldiers, 
and crowds of onlookers. Thus we traveled 
for thirty-six hours. . . . 

"I regret to say that only the unpleasant 
side of Japan is known in Vladivostok, and 
I think the anti- Japanese feeling is quite strong, 
not only among Russians but among other 
nationalities. Here is a great mission for the 
Japanese Christians to show the better side 
of their country, and also for them to work 
for true fellowship with other nationalities." 



1919] 



Brvn Mawr in South China 



41 



BRYN MAWR IN SOUTH CHINA 



News of Bryn Mawr in China and the work 
of Bryn Mawrters there is told in the following 
letter from Christine Hammer '12 who returned 
to this country last June. She went to the 
Orient in August, 1917 with Elizabeth Faries 
'12. She taught English at the True Light 
Seminary to four different years — the first could 
hardly understand a word of English. The first 
gave "A Midsummer Night's Dream" and read 
the "Imitations" before the end of the year. 
The letter reads: 

Pottstown, Pa , March 6, 1919. 

I don't know as much as I want to know 
about Dr. James and Katharine Scott in Wu- 
chang, or about Katrina Van Wagenen in 
Yiyang or about any other Bryn Mawr people 
who may be in north or central China. But I 
can tell you something about Bryn Mawr in 
south China. 

All that I know about have been working in 
Canton, Fannie Sinclair Woods, '01, has been 
there, at the Canton Christian College. I 
don't know how much work she did at the 
College; I imagine she spent much of her time 
taking care of her family, but her husband is on 
the College staff, and I have no doubt that she 
found time for work with the girls. Lily Loshe, 
'99, is there now, teaching English. It is a 
splendid institution, co-educational, having 
under its charge primary, grammar and high 
schools for both girls and boys. There is a 
young Chinese man, a graduate of the College 
department, conducting the primary school. 
He is a remarkable young man, very wonderful 
with children and most eager about the hundred 
or so that he has in that little school. The men 
in charge of the upper schools and College are 
graduates of American universities, very able 
to use the best educational theory in their 
practice there. 

Marie Belleville, '09, is in Y. W. C. A. work 
in Canton. At present she is studying Can- 
tonese, a task which is so colossal that the first 
two years are given up fairly completely to it. 
The Y. W. C. .A. work in China is interesting. 
It works its way intimately in Chinese lives. 
The Association women have more frequent 
access to Chinese homes than have teachers, it 
seems to me, due to the fact that they must go 
out into the highways and byways to reach the 
people they are to serve. They touch grades 
and groups of girls and women that it is im- 
possible to touch through schools — but I am not 
thereby saying that their work is the better work ! 



For the work that I saw most clearly and 
that I value most highly was done in the True 
Light Middle School. I taught English there 
myself for a year, and it became plain to me 
then that the burden of bringing order and 
peace to China would fall heavily in the near 
future on the shoulders of those school-children, 
that therefore teachers must move mountains. 

The True Light Middle School is a large high 
school, the only one of its size and power in the 
huge southern section of the country, the sec- 
tion which is, by the way, the most progressive 
and intelligent in all China. Girls come to the 
school from Canton, of course, and the country 
around it, and they come from Kong Hong 
Kong and Macao and Swatow and even from 
Shanghai and Peking. It is a new branch two 
years old now, of an old school which was 
built up in the city fifty years ago and the 
middle school department is growing by leaps 
and bounds. Perhaps the most amazing and 
significant things that sight that I saw while 
I was there — significant I mean in the history 
of the school — was the "alumnae meeting" 
held on the fiftieth anniversary of the True 
Light Seminary. There were two hundred odd 
alumnae back for their first re-union. Many 
came with bound feet, and their grandchildren, 
and they were greeted by the present under- 
graduates who plainly belong to a freer, larger 
world yet kept there the dignity and gracious- 
ness of those earlier Chinese women. They 
met together then, as they put it, to make 
their school a light that would shine more 
widely. Chinese girls are very warmly patri- 
otic. 

Elizabeth Faries '12, and Catherine Arthurs, 
'12, botht each in this chool. Elizabeth Faries 
is treasurer of the school and head of the science 
department, Catherine Arthurs lives in a dor- 
mitory and is head of the mathematics depart- 
ment. The school has in it three departments: 
the college preparatory, the normal depart- 
ment, and the domestic science department, 
for it is plain that schooling for Chinese girls 
must teach them more than purely academic 
things. Many more Bryn Mawrters are 
needed just there in that one place, for the 
workers in that great harvest are very few. 
By that same token they are needed all over 
China, and the harvest promises to be extra- 
ordinarily rich. 

Faithfully yours, 

Christine Hammer '12. 



42 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[April 



TWO CONVENTIONS IN ST. LOUIS 



Bryn Mawr was well represented at the 
two conventions held in St. Louis during the 
last two weeks of March. 

Edna Fischel Gelhorn '00 (Mrs. George 
Gelhorn), president of the St. Louis Equal 
Suffrage League was chairman of the com- 
mittee on arrangements for the National 
Suffrage Convention, March 24 to 29. Among 
the alumnae who attended were: Katrina 
Ely Tiffany, '97, (Mrs. Charles L. Tiffany) 
chairman of the Woman's Overseas Hospital 
Unit; Anna B. Lawther, '97, president of the 
Iowa state suffrage association and Marion 
Reilly, '01. 

Collegiate Alumnae 

Louise Congdon Francis '00 (Mrs. Richard 
S. Francis), president of the alumnae associ- 
ation as councilor led the Bryn Mawr dele- 
gation to the Biennial Convention of the 
Association of Collegiate Alumnae which 
was held from March 31 to April 3. The 
members of the delegation were: Edna Fis- 
chel Gelhorn, '00; Leone Robinson Morgan, 
'09; Anna B. Lawther, '97; Irene Loeb, '19; 
Jessie Gilroy Hall, '09; Betsy B. B. Bensburg, 
'16; Margaret Nichols Hardenbergh, '05; 
Maud W. Holmes, '15, and Harriet S. Sheldon, 
'15. 

Dr. Martha Tracy, '98, spoke at the open- 
ing meeting of the convention on public health 
service and Dr. Susan M. Kingsbury, Bryn 
Mawr professor, spoke on industrial supervision. 

Report of Convention 

The secretary of the Bryn Mawr delegation 
makes the following report: 

Monday, March 31. General Business 
meeting called by Mrs. Marvin Rosenberry. 
The president of the St. Louis branch of the 
A. C. A. welcomed the visitors and the roll 
was called. Mrs. Rosenberry opened the 
business with her report. She emphasized the 
following points for consideration by the 
Association: The importance of the asso- 
ciation as a national organisation, the need 
for standardisation of our colleges, the necessity 
for at least two years of liberal education be- 
fore starting professional work, equal pay 
for equal work, and the importance of our 
making it possible for girls of promise whose 
families are not able to send them to college 
to go to college. She stressed the point that 



the A. C. A. must see to it that the humanities 
and liberal education do not perish from the 
earth. In the reports of the directors which 
followed, various other matters were intro- 
duced. Means for raising money were sug- 
gested. The plan for combining alumnae 
and alumni publications in the matter of 
advertising was explained in part, and the 
idea of establishing a club house in Washing- 
ton as a headquarters for the National As- 
sociation was presented. Then came reports 
of the recording secretary, and the treasurer. 

At luncheon Mrs. Morgan of Washington 
told why the time was auspicious for making 
our headquarters in Washington. She said 
the other organisations would probably lo- 
cate in Washington soon if we do not. She 
said also that there is a commodious house 
in a convenient part of Washington which 
will be available for us in June, and that there 
is a possible head of the house in a Smith 
graduate who has been doing similar work in 
war emergency housing, who has had wide 
experience. Then, too, the government of- 
ten calls on the A. C. A for assistance. In 
the past year there have been calls from the 
Bureau of Education, the Civil Service, and 
other bureaux and we should be near at hand. 

The afternoon session opened with the re- 
port of the Executive Secretary. Mrs. Mar- 
tin stated the difficulties of the past year — the 
influenza epidemic, the increased cost of rail- 
road fare, postage, printing, etc. She said 
that 15 new branches of the Association have 
been formed since the last meeting, two years 
ago. In outlining plans for the future work 
of the Association Mrs. Martin mentioned 
the following ten subjects — 1. Americanization 
2. Abolition of adult illiteracy 3. Better 
health education 4. Better teacher training 
and compensation 5. Rural school problem 
6. Movement to open higher fields of education 
to women 7. Effort to put on a firm basis the 
fellowships that we already give and to in- 
crease the number of these fellowships. 8. Wid- 
ening of our field beyond our own country. 
9. The right kind of publicity. (One gentle- 
man who was told that he was to meet re- 
presentatives of the association thought that 
they had something to do with selling alumi- 
num ware). 10. We need a field secretary. 
She said that we must pay more attention to 
education bills when they come up. We 
have centered our attention on higher edu- 



1919] 



Two Conventions in St. Louis 



43 



cation and now we must pay attention to 
general education — the public school especially. 
We started with a national organization and 
have built down to localities, but we must 
not forget that we are a national organization. 

The business of the day ended with the 
reports of the sectional vice-presidents which 
told of the work of the branches. 

Tuesday April 1. This was a day of special 
conferences. Mrs. Francis and I attended 
the conference of Alumnae Associations. The 
work of the conference was presided over by 
Mrs. Coverdal, the president of the Wellesley 
college alumnae Association. 

The following nine subjects formed the 
program of the day's discussion. 1. The 
Allumnae Association, (membership). 2. The 
graduate council (Wellesley had a very 
interesting council made up of alumnae 
Association officers. The president of the 
college, 9 faculty members, the Manager of 
the press board, the editor of the Wellesley 
publication and delegates from clubs). 3. 
The alumnae publications (Michigan has a 
magazine published monthly the year round 
which pays well, The Alumnus. It is the 
magazine of the Alumnae and Alumni.) Some 
advertisements are interesting only to men, 
others only to women, and others to both; the 
latter could be used in co-ed. publications. 
Mrs. Martin explained in detail the question of 
the "Alumni Magazines, Associated," the plan 
for pooling advertising of all college publica- 
tions through the Barnhill advertising Com- 
pany, of New York. Barnhill would represent 
all of the colleges, and each would have to con- 
tribute expenses while the scheme gets on 
its feet. Each magazine would make a con- 
tribution based on its circulation. No maga- 
zine would be prohibited from soliciting ad- 
vertising. Miss Hasbrouck, manager of the 
advertising of the Vassar Quarterly, is interested 
in the matter and would be glad to investi- 
gate it. It was voted that Miss Hasbrouck 
be asked to do this work. The help of the 
various Associations would be needed in find- 
ing out what are the publications which we 
should interest. In this way all of the maga- 
zines might become paying concerns. 

Miss Reilly Presides 

4. At luncheon Miss Reilly introduced 
Professor Paul Hanus of Harvard who spoke 
on "Training women to meet the new demands." 



Miss Reilly next introduced Mrs. Gelhorn (of 
Bryn Mawr College, now the president of the 
Missouri state equal suffrage league) who 
spoke of the opportunities of the St. Louis 
branch of the A. C. A. for helping with edu- 
cational work. She mentioned the under- 
takings suggested by Mrs. Catt for the work 
of the suffrage league as being distinctly A. 
C. A. work in that they all deal with edu- 
cational problems. 

The points of the conference in the after- 
noon were four. The local organization, clubs, 
dues, etc. Bryn Mawr has clubs which 
pay dues and branches which pay no dues. 
Goucher has branches which pay dues. Rad- 
cliff has no branches but has several local 
clubs. Smith has local clubs. Branches 
must have 25 members. A branch of 75 
members is entitled to have a councillor. At 
Wells clubs are formed of ten or more indi- 
viduals. They keep in touch with the exe- 
cutive secretary of the association. Members 
of the club do not have to be members of the 
Alumnae Association. Wellesley has three 
classes of clubs, large city clubs, state clubs, 
and small local clubs. They have a sys- 
tem of keeping in touch with the college 
through councillors. They have one coun- 
cilor for each 100 paying members. They 
go to college every year and bring back news 
of the college to the clubs. A publicity com- 
mittee sends out bulletins. They invite 
undergraduates to a Christmas meeting and 
ask for reports from them. 

5. Should Alumnae Association and Col- 
lege clubs work for other than college interests, 
e.g., War Service Committees— their future? 
The colleges are at present keeping on with 
war work already begun. Radcliff is just 
sending over an automobile corps. 

6. College endowment. Vassar raised large 
amounts in a very short time by thoroughly 
organised schemes. 

7. College publicity. Wellesley directs it by 
the press board. Other colleges seem to have 
no organised methods. 

8. Alumnae visiting. Goucher alumnae 
visit the college at specified times while classes 
are in session, the week after mid-years. 
Smith visits in February , and also in June 
during the week before commencement. Well- 
esley has an alumnae visiting day. 9. As- 
sociations of class secretaries. Wellesley has 
such an association and it worked together 
wonderfully at the time of the fire. 



44 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[April 



All of the per cents and figures of the day's 
meeting are to be published further in detail 
in the Journal of the Alumnae Association. 

B. M. Membership High 

Bryn Mawr had 94 per cent of her Alum- 
nae in her Alumnae Association, while Welles- 
ley has only 51 per cent. I did not take down 
the other figures, but Bryn Mawr was one of 
the highest, if not the highest in membership. 

Wednesday April 2. This day was one of 
general business again. The question of 
raising the dues of the Association was widely 
discussed. Again the assertion that the 
Association is national not merely local was 
stressed. The national organization must 
have more funds to carry on its very definite 
work. It seemed better in many ways to 
raise the dues rather than to create sustain- 
ing memberships, special contributions plans 
etc. Seven branches protested against rais- 
ing the dues, 25 were in favor of the plan and 
two were not directed to vote in the matter. It 
was voted to make the Journal a monthly 
magazine once more as soon as the funds of 
the association permit. The budget for next 
year was read and accepted. 



COMMENCEMENT PLANS 

Eleven classes plan reunions on the campus 
this June. The class of '89 will celebrate the 
thirtieth anniversary of its graduation. Other 
classes reuning are '94, '99, '04, '08, '09, 
'11, '14, '15, '16, '17, '18. This is the first 
time that the plan of the classes graduating 
during the war to return at the same time, 
has been tried. 

Alumnae supper will be held Tuesday, 
June 3 in the Gymnasium at the class of 
alumnae day. The banquet will be at 7 
o'clock and it is hoped that the seniors will 
postpone their bonfire in order to give the 
alumnae the pleasure of seeing it. Georgina 
Biddle, '09, will be toastmistress and Jean 
Crawford, '02, is in charge of arrangements. 
The committee on seating has not been ap- 
pointed as yet. Mrs. Francis will have charge 
of the food arrangements. 

The senior class plans to give garden party 
on the same basis which it was given by 1917. 
Tea rather than supper will be served. 

Dates for class suppers so far decided upon 
follows: 

Saturday, May 31: '11— Merion; '04— Den- 
bigh; '09— Pern, '14— Rock. 

Monday, June 2: '99— Merion; '16— Den; 
'18— Rock; '19— Pern. 



NEWS FROM THE CAMPUS 



President Thomas has been granted leave 
of absence from the college for the next year 
and plans to take a trip around the world. 
Dean Taft will be acting president and Hilda 
Smith '10 will be temporary dean. 

"The Directors of the College have granted 
me the desire of my heart," said President 
Thomas in announcing her plans in chapel on 
April 9. "I was born a globe-trotter. If 
woman's education had not been in such a 
sad state when I was your age, I think I should 
have been an explorer." 

President Thomas has been at the service 
of the college since 1884 continuously with 
the exception of four months in Egypt in 1911 
and seven months of brief illnesses. 

"Now that the time has come when I can 
be absent without injury to the college, I 
want to go everywhere that I have not been 
before," said President Thomas. 

She plans to go to North Africa and as far 
as possible into the Sahara, to spend several 



winter months in India, to go into Siam, Java 
and to touch at the South Sea Islands. She 
hopes to go up the Nile, cross the Arabian 
desert with tents and camels, to Palestine 
and Asia Minor, reaching Greece in the spring. 

"Dean Taft has most generously postponed 
going to London to complete her doctor's 
desertation until the following year," said 
President Thomas. 

In order to allow her to go on President 
Thomas's return, the directors have appointed 
Miss Smith dean for two years. 

UNDERGOES OPERATION 

President Thomas made an excellent re- 
covery from an operation which she under- 
went at Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore 
February 26. Her surgeon, Dr. Halstead, 
assures her that she will feel great relief as a 
result and that walking will be made easier 
for her. 



1919] 



News from the Campus 



45 



The operation is a complement to one be- 
gun several years ago. Its purpose is the 
restoration of muscular tissue which became 
contracted as a result of a burn received when 
she was a child. 

PLAN TRIP ROUND THE WORLD 

Marion Parris Smith, '01 and her husband, 
Dr. William Roy Smith plan to spend their 
sabbatical year in taking a sixteen-months 
trip around the world. They will go first to 
Japan, through Korea to China, to British 
Malaya, and thence to India, where they 
will spend several weeks studying. They 
hope to cross East Africa and travel down the 
Nile. They plan to reach London for the 
summer of 1920. 

FOREIGN FELLOWSHIPS 

Amy McMasters, '17, Bryn Mawr and 
Helen Patch, '14, Mt. Holyoke, have been 
awarded fellowships by the association of 
Collegiate Alumnae for study abroad. Miss 
MacMasters will study at the University of 
London and plans to sail about the first of 
October. Miss Patch goes to Paris to take 
up Romance languages at the Sorbonne. 

APPOINTED CHIEF OF DIVISION 

Dr. Dorothy Child, '10, has been appointed 
chief of the Division of Child Welfare of the 
Pennsylvania State Health Department. Dr. 
Child is the first woman to be appointed to 
this office. 

CELEBRATE GYMNASIUM 
ANNIVERSARY 

On George Washington's Birthday, ten 
years, ago, the gymnasium was opened. This 
year the Athletic Association gave a dance as 
an anniversary celebration. Marjorie Young 
'08 and Cynthia Wesson '09, presidents of 
the Athletic Association at the time the Gym- 
nasium was in construction, were invited to 
be present. 

ROOSEVELT'S VERDICT 

A verdict which Roosevelt once pronounced 
on Bryn Mawr was recalled last week by 
Signaler Thomas Skeyhill at the tea given 
in his honor by the History Club. 

"I happened to be traveling on the train 



with Roosevelt one time when several of us 
were discussing which was the greatest wom- 
an's college. Finally I said, 'I'll ask Colonel 
Roosevelt.' 

"'Why, Bryn Mawr, of course,' was his 
answer." 1 — The College News. 

STUDENTS BUILDING ONCE AGAIN 

Demand for a Bryn Mawr theater has 
brought the question of a students building 
to the fore again. The class of 1919 to show 
their eagerness have pledged $3,425 if the 
work begins immediately. 

In the month of March several under- 
graduate association meetings were called on 
this subject and the students went home for 
the Easter vacation with the assurance that 
President Thomas and the president of the 
undergraduate association would hold a con- 
ference with the college architects, Winsor 
and Soule, on the present cost of building 
and a revision of the plans. 

The students building fund now totals 
$25,000. It is certain that $50,000 will be 
needed before the building can be started. 

It was suggested that a temporary theater 
might be built by the college, but this plan 
is giving way before the one of starting on 
the theater wing of the students building. 

The class of 1900 has pledged itself to give 
the fireplace. It was in March 1900 that the 
project first started, as is interestingly told 
by the following clipping from the Fortnightly 
Philistine: 

"The convenience such a building would 
be need hardly be explained. No more for- 
lorn alumnae sitting in Merion parlors and 
trying to feel at home; no more struggles with 
the difiiculties that have hitherto made the 
giving of a play such an enormous under- 
taking; no more trying to sing in a cell fourteen 
by eight feet." 

As then planned the building would in- 
clude "an auditorium, music rooms, offices 
for the various clubs and papers, a library, 
a dining-hall, kitchens, and rooms for visit- 
ing alumnae, with the possibility of a bowling 
alley. . . . 

"Everybody agreed that they wanted such 
a building. $30,000 was named as the lowest 
sum for its cost." 

A "plan of renewing Elizabethan Morris 
dances and May games in as artistic and 
historically accurate a manner as possible," 
suggested as a means of raising the fund by 



46 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[April 



Evangeline Walker Andrews, '93 (Mrs. Charles 
McL. Andrews) gave rise to the Bryn Mawr 
May Day. The meeting voted to give such 
an entertainment in the coming May (less 
than two months off). The $5,249 made 
at this first May Day was the beginning of 
the students building fund. 

URGE LEAGUE OF NATIONS 

Bryn Mawr joined eight other women's 
colleges in sending President Wilson a cable 
message asking that a league of nations be 
made an essential point in the peace program. 
The resolution was passed by the faculty and 
the undergraduate association in meetings 
held in January. The other colleges in the 
movement were: Vassar, Wellesley, Smith, 
Mt. Holyoke, Radcliffe, Barnard, Goucher 
and the Woman's College of Brown University. 

PICTURES OF PRESIDENT THOMAS 

Autographed photographs of President 
Thomas are being sold by the Graduate club 
for the benefit of the Bryn Mawr Service 
Corps. The pictures were taken by Char- 
lotte Fairchild of New York City. There 
are two poses, one a profile of head and shoul- 
ders, the other, taken standing in academic 
gown. Each pose may be bought in three 
sizes 4 by 6 inches, $1.50, 7 by 9 inches, $2.50 
and 10 by 13 inches, $4.50. They may be 
ordered from Margaret Monroe, Pembroke 
East. 

NEW ASSISTANT BUSINESS 
MANAGER 

Helen Lautz, '12, resigned in January as 
assistant business manager of the college, to 
spend the rest of the winter in California. 
Her sister, Ruth Lautz, '16, who has been 
working for the Emergency Fleet Corpora- 
tion in Philadelphia, has taken her place. 

MARRY COLLEGE MEN 

About 90 per cent of the married alumnae 
of Bryn Mawr college have married college 
graduates, Donald M. Marvin finds in a sup- 
plementary investigation appended to his 
inquiry into the relation of a woman's employ- 
ment to her choice of husband, published by 
the American Statistical Association. More 
than 60 per cent of Bryn Mawr alumnae marry 
men in professions. 



LAND ARMY MEETING 

The Pennsylvania division of the Woman's 
Land Army will hold its annual meeting at 
at Bryn Mawr on Saturday, April 26. Anita 
Preston ex-' 14 has been president of the winter 
club of the 630 women and girls who worked 
under the army last summer. 

FARM AND GARDEN ASSOCIATION 

The Woman's National Farm and Garden 
Association will hold several sessions of its 
annual meeting at the college on May 23. 

FICTION LIBRARY ABOLISHED 

Denbigh Fiction Library, after years of 
failing health has at last passed on. The 
books were turned over to the College Li- 
brary by a vote of the Undergraduate associ- 
ation last month. At least half of these books 
will be added to the library, others will be 
given away or sold. Light reading, for which 
there are duplicates in the stack, will form 
the beginning of a library in the Infirmary 
for convalescent students. 

BACK LEAGUE OF NATIONS 

Popular votes taken in the dining-rooms of 
the halls in February by members of the Ma- 
jor Economics class showed that only four stu- 
dents out of 361 opposed the plan. Six students 
were either undecided or uninterested. 

ROCKEFELLER LOSES WARDEN 

Adeline Werner Vorys, '16, (Mrs. Webb 
I. Vorys) left college to meet her husband 
in New York early in April. Captain Vorys 
was returning after ten months service in 
Italy. They will live in Columbus, Ohio. 

ALUMNAE REGISTER OUT 

Almost a third of the Bryn Mawr alumnae 
are married according to the statistics pub- 
lished in the alumnae register for 1919. The 
figures are 637 out of 1621. More than half 
(53.6 per cent) have paid occupations. The 
occupational record follows: 

Doctors 31 

Students of medicine 10 

Lawyers 13 

Law students 3 

Clerical workers 59 



1919] 



News from the Clubs 



47 



War Relief and Red Cross Worker: 

At home 37 

Abroad 69 

Social workers 69 

Teachers 279 

Unclassified 176 

Total 746 

VOCATIONAL CONFERENCE 

Alumnae who spoke at the Vocational Con- 
ference held at the college in March are: 

Social Service: Pauline Goldmark, '96, 
manager of the Women's Service Section of 
the United States Railroad administration. 

Business: Bertha Greenough, '17, who is 
in charge of cost accounting at the Builders' 
Iron Foundry, Providence, Rhode Island. 

Medicine and Public Health: Dorothy 
Childs, who is chief of the Division of Child 
Welfare, of the Pennsylvania Health Depart- 
ment; Martha Tracy, '98, dean of the Women's 
Medical College of Pennsylvania; Antoinette 
Canon, '07, head of the Social Service depart- 
ment of the University Hospital, Philadelphia. 

Writing: Theresa Helburn, '08, dramatic 
critic of The Nation and Martha Plaisted 
Saxton, '08 (Mrs. Eugene W. Saxton) of Doran 
company. 

MISS REILLY'S PORTRAIT 

The class of 1901 will present to the college 
at commencement time, a portrait of Marion 
Reilly, '01, painted by Cecilia Beaux to be 
hung in the Library. The picture was ex- 



hibited at the Pennsylvania Academy of 
Fine Arts this spring. Photographs of the 
portrait are on sale for the benefit of the Ser- 
vice Corps, of which Miss Reilly is chairman 
of the administrative committee. 

SECOND INDUSTRIAL COURSE 

The second six months course in employ- 
ment management under the Carola Woeri- 
shoffer Graduate Department of Social Econo- 
my and Social Economy opened in February 
with a group ten students. 

Their names are: Marie Borngesser, Univer- 
sity of Pennsylvania; Estelle Frankfurter, 
Radcliffe; Caroline Kranz, Peabody College, 
Nashville; Mabel May Kroh, University of 
Idaho; Florence Mason, Elmira; Catherine 
McCausland and Dorothy McDowell, both 
from Mt. Holyoke; Bertha Morehouse, Ohio 
Wesleyan; Mary C. Schauffler, Western Re- 
serve; Evelyn Stadler, University of Missouri. 

Llysyfran will not be used next year as an 
undergraduate hall of residence. It may be 
used for graduate students or it may be given 
up entirely. 

Professors Gray and Savage who have been 
absent on leave of absence for war service, 
have notified the college that they will return 
next year. 

Merion Hall library which has been used 
for Red Cross work during the last year and 
a half, has been repapered and given back 
to the students for general use. 

The Senior class presented "The Beaux 
Stratagem" on April 5. 



NEWS FROM THE CLUBS 



NEW YORK 

The New York Bryn Mawr Club held its 
annual meeting on February 5th, and elected 
the following officers: President, Mrs. Percy 
Jackson; Vice-president, Miss Theresa Hel- 
burn; Treasurer, Mrs. Rutger Bleeker Miller; 
Assistant Treasurer, Miss Janet R. Grace; 
Secretary, Mrs. Philip Wager Lowry; Chair- 
man Admissions Committee, Miss Helen Carey 
Chairman House Committee, Miss Louise 
Fleischmann. 

ST. LOUIS 

Caroline McCormick Slade, ex-'96 (Mrs. 
Francis Louis Slade), Anna Lawther, '96 
Louise Congdon Francis, '00 (Mrs. Richard 



S. Francis), and Marion Reilly, '01, were 
speakers at a tea given by the St. Louis Bryn 
Mawr club to interest girls in going to Bryn 
Mawr at the time of the Association of Col- 
legiate Alumnae early this month. Elizabeth 
Kirkbride, '96, and Harriet Bradford, '15, 
were among the speakers. Slides of the 
college campus were shown. 

WASHINGTON 

Officers were elected in January with the 
following results: President, Amy Rock Ran- 
some, '93 (Mrs. Frederick L. Ransome); vice 
president and treasurer, Henrietta S. Riggs, 
'10; secretary, Elise Funkhouser, '11. 



48 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[April 



OHIO 

The Ohio Bryn Mawr club met at the Co- 
lumbus School for Girls on March 29. There 
were fifteen members present, all from Co- 
lumbus, except Eva G. White Kah (Mrs. 
Ralph Kah) from Sidney and Mary A. Wil- 
liams (Mrs. John H. Sherman) from Fremont. 
Mrs. Francis, president of the alumnae as- 
sociation was the guest of the occasion. In 
the morning she gave a current news talk 



from the Campus, touching on the Sage be- 
quest, the new clubs, the "new organ," the 
student buildings and many other things 
of interest. In the afternoon slides of the 
college buildings, of plays and teams were 
shown. 

The club is holding its annual elections by 
mail since so few members were able to at- 
tend the meeting. There are 40 paid members 
in all. 



NEWS FROM THE CLASSES 



1889 

Class editor, Mrs. Frank H. Simpson, Over- 
look, College Hill, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

1890 

Class editor, Mrs. Edward H. Keiser, Clay- 
ton, Mo. 

1891 

Class editor, Miss Maria Voorhees Bedinger, 
Anchorage, Ky. 

1892 

Class editor, Mrs. Frederick M. Ives, 318 
West 75th Street, New York City. 

1893 

Class editor, Mrs. J. Esrey Johnson Jr., 8 
Oak Way, Hartsdale, N. Y. 

Carpe diem. 

All members of '93 are urged to consider 
favorably the plan of holding a Twenty-fifth 
Anniversary reunion in June. The war made 
it necessary to delay the celebration; the armis- 
tice gives us the opportunity to meet. Our 
Fiftieth Anniversary, though feeble of step, is 
moving steadily forward. 

Carpe diem. 

Bertha Haven Putnam received last Febru- 
ary, for the second time, the Alice Freeman 
Palmer Memorial Fellowship, given by the 
Association of Collegiate Alumnae, with per- 
mission to defer its use on account of the war. 
Mount Holyoke College granted her leave of 
absence for one year. She is now working in 
the library of the Harvard Law School, editing 



two manuscript treatises on "The Justices of 
Peace," of the fifteenth and the sixteenth cen- 
turies respectively, for a volume in the "Oxford 
Studies in Social and Legal History," edited by 
Sir Paul Vinogradoff. It is her intention to go 
to England in April, and to finish the book in 
London, getting material in the British Museum 
and in the London Record Office. 

Philip H. Wynne, husband of Agnes Whiting 
Wynne, died on February 11, at their summer 
home in Deerfield, Mass. He was an electri- 
cal engineer, the Wynne galvanometer was his 
invention, and he had an important part in 
the development of the modern electric car 
controller. 

Rachel Oliver is again spending the winter in 
Tryon, N. C. She does some tutoring and 
teaching, in addition to work in the library. 

Conservation work done by Jane Brownell 
last summer in Maine contains valuable sugges- 
tions for today and for the future. She con- 
served everything possible; this means that she 
sawed and carried in waste wood and drift 
wood, picked and preserved wild berries, and 
made cottage cheese. Home Service under the 
Red Cross occupied her this winter. 

Another successful conservator is Amy Rock 
Ransome (Mrs. Frederick L. Ransome) as Food 
Production chairman under the Council of 
National Defense in the District of Columbia, 
she "put across" the Land Army there and 
operated four units of a hundred women work- 
ers in two nearby counties in Maryland. Later 
she was made chairman of the Legislative Com- 
mittee of the A. R. A and is working for an 
increase in teachers' salaries. 

Henrietta Palmer is still trying to have issued 
to the original subscribers the book that she 
translated in aid of Mme. Cons's work for 
French and Belgian soldiers from the invaded 
districts ("Letters from a French Soldier to 



1919] 



News from the Classes 



49 



His Mother," published in London). Copy- 
right laws are the obstacle. She asks her 
friends not to be discouraged by the delay. 

It is welcome news that Elva Lee is much 
better and looks forward to complete recovery 
at the end of the summer. 

Susan Walker FitzGerald's (Mrs. Richard 
Y. FitzGerald) new farm turns out to be a good 
business enterprise as well as a summer home: 
she drives into Boston every week with her 
produce, in true farmer fashion. 

At the recent Victory Dinner and Recon- 
struction Conference in Washington, to which 
representative women came from all parts of 
the United States, four members of the class of 
'93 were present; Mary Crawford Dudley 
(Mrs. Charles B. Dudley), Margaret Hilles 
Johnson, (Mrs. Joseph E. Johnson Jr.) Evan- 
geline Walker Andrews, (Mrs. Charles McL. 
Andrews and Susan Walker FitzGerald (Mrs. 
Richard Y. FitzGerald). 

A daughter of Mary Atkinson Watson (Mrs 
George Watson) Elizabeth A. Watson, is a 
senior in Swarthmore College this year. 

Emma Atkins Davis (Mrs. Edward B. Davis) 
organized a Red Cross unit last summer of 
which she was elected chairman. They raised 
over $17,000, and did a wonderful lot of work, 
sewing, making dressings, and managing a 
canteen. 

Nellie Neilson finished some time ago a study 
entitled "The Terrier of Fleet," with an intro- 
duction on Intercommoning, for the series of 
"Records of English Social and Economic 
History" (published for the British Academy 
by the Oxford Press). It is in the press, but 
has not yet appeared because of war conditions. 

Elizabeth Nichols Moores (Mrs. Charles W. 
Moores) has been doing without domestic service 
for conservation purposes, and yet has found 
time for much knitting and sewing for our sol- 
diers. Her daughter Emily expects to take her 
A.B. at Bryn Mawr in June and a son, Charles 
W. Moores III, will enter Wabash College next 
year, the third of his name on the college lists. 

Josephine Jackson Ballagh, ex-'93, (Mrs. 
James C. Ballagh) whose children number four, 
has "little to show for" (her extra) "time," 
except ' 'some club work, a little social service, 
a little writing, some public speaking mainly in 
schools and clubs, and a little church work!" 

1894 

/ 

Class editor, Mrs. R. N. Durfee, 19 Highland 

Avenue, Fall River, Mass. 



1895 

Class editor, Miss Mary F. Ellis, 2505 South 
Lambert Street, Philadelphia, Penna. 

1896 

Class editor, Miss Mary W. Jewett, Moravia, 
N. Y. 

1897 

Class editor, Miss Mary M. Campbell, Walker 
Road, West Orange, N. J. 

Dr. Harry H. Weist, husband of Alice Cilley 
Weist, died unexpectedly at his home in New 
York March 6. 

Elizabeth Day Seymour Angel (Mrs. John 
Day) has a second son, Henry Seymour Angel, 
born on January 20. Her husband has now 
given up his war work and returned to his 
studio and sculpture. They have bought a 
late Georgian house with garden in St. John's 
Wood. Their address is 4 Greville Place, 
London, N. W. 6. Mrs. Angel writes that 
she would be glad to see any of her Bryn Mawr 
friends who happen to be in London. 

1898 

Class editor, Mrs. Wildred Bancroft, Slaters- 
ville, R. I. 

Hannah Carpenter is devoting her time to 
the work of an important committee of Federal 
Hill House, Providence, that encourages and 
finances fine needlework among the Italian 
women. 

Leila Stoughton wrote in September: "Have 
worked in Evian with repatries, in Beauvais 
with refugees and am now supposed to be at 
Toul in Alsace, though I happen at the moment 
to be in Brittany on a vacation. I took a 
nurses aid course at Belleone, hence my pres- 
ence here." 

Grace Clarke Wright, ex-'98, (Mrs. Vernon A. 
Wright) is spending the winter in the South 
with her husband and daughter Lucy. 

1899 

Class editor, Mrs. Edward H. Waring, 325 
Washington Street, Glen Ridge, N. J. 

1899 will hold her Twentieth Reunion this 
June, celebrating it by a dinner at Bryn Mawr, 
during commencement week. Class head- 
quarters will be established in Pembroke and 
will be filled with pictures of class members, 
their husbands and children and with sou- 
venirs of college days. The reunion committee 



50 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[April 



consists of Anna Guffay Miller (Mrs. Carroll 
Miller) chairman, Elizabeth A. Andrews and 
Laura Pinkham Waring (Mrs. Edward H. 
Waring). Statistics of the class activities dur- 
ing the last five years will be published in the 
Quarterly. 

Ellen P. Kilpatrick has returned from France 
where she has been doing Y. M. C. A. canteen 
work. She spoke at Bryn Mawr at the time of 
the annual meeting of the alumnae association. 

Edith Chapin Craven (Mrs. Thomas T. T. 
Craven) is teaching psychology and English at 
Ogontz School, Rydal, Penna. 

1900 

Class editor, Miss Mary Helen MacCoy, 
Social Service, Base Hospital, Camp Devens, 
Mass. 

Elsie Murray has been working as collab- 
orator on a medical work on epidemics. 

Helen MacCoy is a medical social service 
worker at the base hospital at Camp Devens, 
Ayer, Mass. 

1901 

Class editor, Miss Marion Reilly, 2015 De 
Lancey Place, Philadelphia, Penna. 

1902 

Class editor, Mrs. L. D. Howe, 2400 16th 
Street, N. W., Washington, D. C. 

Grace Douglas Johnston (Mrs. M. L. Johns- 
ton) is Associate Director of the Chicago Can- 
teen, American Red Cross, and has been serv- 
ing in this capacity since the United States 
went into the war. 

Harriett Spencer Pierce, ex-'02, (Mrs. H. C. 
Pierce) has gone to Ironton, Ohio, to live, 
where her address is 1021 South 6th St. 

Eleanor Wood Hoppin, (Mrs. Joseph Hoppin) 
is living in Bryn Mawr this winter, where her 
husband is again Professor of Archaeology in 
the College. Mr. and Mrs. Hoppin have the 
Otis Skinner house. 

Anne Rotan Howe, (Mrs. Thorndike Howe), 
was Associate Director, Bureau of Personnel 
Potomac Division, American" Red Cross from 
July 1918 until January 1919 when the per- 
sonnel bureaus of the Red Cross were closed. 
Mrs. Howe's address is 2400 Sixteenth Street, 
N. W. and she expects to remain in Washington 
until Colonel Howe returns from France. Colo- 
nel Howe sailed in September 1917 in command 
of the 102nd Field Artillery and in May 1918 was 
appointed Chief of the Postal Express Service, 
U. S. A. headquarters in Paris. 



1903 



Class editor, Mrs. H. K. Smith, Farmington, 
Conn. 

Dr. George Pierce, husband of Ethel M. 
Girdwood and brother of Mary Pierce, '12, 
died at his home in Upper Montclair, N. J., 
recently of burns received in an explosion in his 
laboratory at the Colgate and Company plant, 
in Jersey City. 

1904 

Class editor, Miss Emma C. Thompson, 213 
South 50th Street, Philadelphia, Penna. 

May Frace was married on December 24, 
1918, to Dr. Evan Dale Field at Clinton, New 
Jersey. 

Hel,en Amy Macan, ex-'04 (Mrs. George 
C. Macan, Jr.) is conducting the musical De- 
partment of the Women's Club of Easton. 

Mary Cameron Wakefield's husband, Walter 
Wakefield, died in February at his home in 
Tucson, Arizona. 

Ruth Wood De Wolf, (Mrs. Philip De Wolf) 
is studying stenography and typewriting in 
French. 

Leda White is serving on the Faculty of the 
Drexel Institute, Phila. 

Eleanor Bliss delivered a paper on War 
Minerals as affecting Peace Relations before the 
Geographical Society of America at their meet- 
ing in Baltimore this winter. In the autumn 
she made a survey of Rittenhouse Gap Mines, 
reporting on the iron ores found there. 

1905 

Class editor, Mrs. Ellsworth Huntington, care 
of Mrs. L. J. Tyler, 34 Edgehill Road, New 
Haven, Conn. 

1906 

Class editor, Mrs. Robert Walcott, 152 
Brattle Street, Cambridge, Mass. 

Sue Delano McKelvey (Mrs. Charles W 
McKelvey) is with her father at Washington 
Square, New York City, this winter. 

1907 

Class editor, Mrs. R. E. Apthorp, care of Dr. 
C. H. Williams, Charles River Road, Cam- 
bridge, Mass. 

Dorothy Forster Miller (Mrs. Rutger Bleecher 
Miller) has a daughter, Susan Gardener, born 
last October. 

Margaret Ayer Barnes (Mrs. Cecil Barnes, 
has a third son, Benjamin Ayers Barnes, born 
February 13 in Washington, D. C. 



1919] 



News from the Classes 



51 



1908 

Class editor, Mrs. Dudley Montgomery, 115 
Langdon Street, Madison, Wis. 

Virginia McKenney Claiborne (Mrs. Robert 
W. Claiborne) spent six weeks of the autumn 
in Washington with Anna Carriere. Her hus- 
band is now in Cuba and Virginia is in Peters- 
burg. They expect to live in England after he 
is discharged from the Marine Corps. 

Margaret Lewis MacVeagh (Mrs. Lincoln 
MacVeagh) has gone to New Haven to take 
charge of the school of her sister, Mrs. Clive 
Day, who has gone to Paris with her husband 
who is a member of the Peace Commission. 
Margaret's husband, Capt. Lincoln MacVeagh 
is still in France, serving as aide to Maj. Gen. 
Adelbert G. Crouklite who is commanding one 
of the army corps. 

Louise Milligan Herron (Mrs. Charles D. 
Herron) is living in Washington where her 
husband is stationed. Their address is 2723 
Connecticut Avenue. 

Theresa Helburn spent a few days in Wash- 
ington the middle of February. She attended 
the informal reunion of 1908 held after mid- 
years. 

Josephine Proudfit Montgomery is expecting 
her husband, Major Dudley Montgomery, to 
return from France about the first of April. 

1909 

Class editor, Miss Atta C. Stevens, 4700 Ken- 
wood Avenue, Chicago, 111. 

1910 

Class editor, Mrs. H. B. Van Dyne, Troy, 
Penna. 

Margaret Shearer Smith (Mrs. Jewell Smith) 
has a daughter born January 4. 

Cornelia Skinner, '22, who appeared as one 
of the children in 1910 's Junior-Senior supper 
play, Medea, appeared again on the Bryn 
Mawr stage in her class freshman show on 
March 1. 

1911 

Class editor, Miss Margaret J. Hobart, The 
Churchman, 381 Fourth Avenue, New York 
City. 

Two 1911 babies were born on the second day 
of the New Year, one in California and one in 
New York. Catherine Delano Grant (Mrs. 
Alexander Gait Grant) has a son, John, born on 
January 2 at Coranado Beach, California. 



Elizabeth Taylor Russell (Mrs. John F. Russell, 
Jr.) has a daughter, Janet, born in New York 
City the same day 

Marion Crane Carroll (Mrs. Charles A. Car- 
roll) is living in her house in Ithaca, New York, 
again. Her husband is in France at one of the 
embarkation ports. 

1911 is planning for an eighth reunion this 
spring. Louise Russell, Norvelle Browne and 
Elizabeth Taylor Russell (Mrs. John F. Russell, 
Jr.) are the committee in charge. 

Olive Van Horn, ex-'ll, is one of the Y. W.- 
C. A. industrial secretaries and is at present 
engaged in training secretaries-to-be. She 
spent ten months last winter in one of the Du 
Pont towns where the conditions among the 
girls were much in need of betterment and 
succeeded in effecting a great improvement. 

Amy Walker Field (Mrs. James Field) and 
her son are living with Mrs. Walker's parents in 
Chicago this winter. 

Norvelle Browne is working in Mrs. Glenn's 
office in the Home Service section of the Amer- 
ican Red Cross in New York. 

Helen Parkhurst read a paper before the 
students and faculty of Smith College the first 
week in March under the auspices of the college 
philosophical society. 

Elizabeth Taylor Russell (Mrs. John F. 
Russell, Jr.) will act as the vice-chairman of the 
Trades section of the city organization for the 
Victory Loan. Mrs. Russell is vice-chairman 
of the committee on child welfare legislation of 
the New York City Club. 

Helen Tredway Graham (Mrs. E. A. Gra- 
ham) has a position as assistant in the phar- 
macology at Johns Hopkins Medical School. 
She says "Anybody who has tried it will agree 
that the combination of a baby and a job is 
strenuous but it is an improvement on either 
one without the other." 

Ruth Vickery Holmes (Mrs. Bradford B. 
Holmes) is living with her children in Boston 
and teaching at Miss Windsor's School. Capt. 
Holmes has been in France since last spring. 

Margaret Prussing Le Vino (Mrs. Albert 
Shelby Le Vino) has acquired a ranch in Cali- 
fornia which she irrigates and cultivates and 
farms in general largely with her own hands. 
Her address is Box 123, Hollywood, California. 

Elizabeth Ross has moved from Cleveland to 
Milwaukee where her address is 305 Prospect 
Avenue. 

Anna Stearns and Helen Ramsey both did 
volunteer nursing during the influenza epidemic. 



52 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[April 



Ruth Tanner is a reconstruction aide and is 
working in a hospital in this country. She was 
at Walter Reid Hospital for some time and at 
Base Hospital No. 17 at Markleton, Pennsyl- 
vania. 

Ruth Wells has spent the winter at home in 
Hanover, Vermont. 

Alice Channing has been in France for more 
than a year, and Charlottle Claflin in Italy. 

Kate Chambers Seelye (Mrs. Laurens Seelye) 
has a second daughter born on March 11. 

Frances Porter Adler (Mrs. Herman M. 
Adler) is helping her husband in his psychology 
work at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas. 

Margaret Friend Low (Mrs. Martin Low) 
has a son, born January 29. 

Helen Emerson, who is working under the 
Bryn Mawr Service Corps, is at a canteen with 
ten other workers at St. Germain de Fisse. 
As many as 3,000 French and American troops 
are served at the canteen every night and some- 
times 10,000 have to be fed. 

1912 

Class editor, Mrs. J. H. MacDonald, 3227 
North Pennsylvania Street, Indianapolis, Ind. 

Helen Barber Matteson (Mrs. Paul Matte- 
son) who taught for three months in Baltimore 
at the Roland Park County School, rejoined 
her husband soon after his discharge from the 
Tank Corps. Their address is 4 Saville Street, 
Cambridge, Mass. 

Mary W. Brown just returned from service 
in a base hospital in Limoges, reports an excit- 
ing trip going over on the Leviathan. Six sub- 
marines chased them, but as they were in sight 
of land and in broad daylight, "it was hard to 
realize the danger — more like a football game." 

Nora Cam, after two years work in an aircraft 
factory is now doing "most interesting experi- 
mental work, wind channel experiments on 
model airplanes etc." She says, "Here in 
England we feel a great load has been lifted 
away, but our relief is tempered by uncertainty 
over the industrial turmoils." 

Carmelita Chase Hinton (Mrs. Sebastian 
Hinton) has a son, William Howard, born 
February 2. 

Pauline Clark is working for the War Labor 
Board in Washington. 

Karin Costello Stephen (Mrs. Adrian Ste- 
phen), ex-'12, writes of two daughters, Ann and 
Judith Karin, of her work as secretary of the 



local labor party "in a fearfully reactionary 
constituency," of the hope of a new General 
Election when the soldiers and sailors come 
back, and of her belief in "what they call 
'direct action' as a last resort if constitutional 
means fail." In regard to President Wilson 
she says, "It is not very agreeable to think what 
sort of peace the rest of the allies would have 
arranged if they had been left to themselves." 
Julia Haines MacDonald (Mrs. John Mac- 
Donald) until prevented by influenza, was 
teaching arithmetic in the school for the pa- 
tients of U. S. General Hospital at West Baden, 
111., of which her husband was in charge. 

Christine Hammer is head of an out-of-door 
elementary school in Pottstown, Penna. 

Ai Hoshino, who is at Columbia, Teachers' 
College this year, writes of the Cosmopolitan 
Club there, where all the foreign students 
gather weekly to discuss the league of nations 
etc. 

Beatrice Howson is in the employment de- 
partment of the Atlantic Refining Company. 
Hers is accident compensation work. 

Helen Lautz is in Redlands, California, visit- 
ing her brother at 51- Cypress Court. 

Margaret Peck has announced ' her engage- 
ment to Lieut. Thomas S. MacEwan. 

Elizabeth Pinney Hunt (Mrs. Andrew Hunt) 
has a second son, born last July. 

Henrietta Runyon Winfrey ex-' 12 (Mrs. 
George H. L. Winfrey) has a third child, a son 
born November 28. 

Catherine Thompson went "from class room 
to Creel Board" and thence to the Film and 
Picture Branch, executive section, D. M. A. 

Dorothy Wolff Douglas (Mrs. Paul Douglas) 
is working for the Consumers' League in Phila- 
delphia. She is engaged chiefly with the prob- 
lem of the minimum wage. 

Margaret Thackery Weems ex-' 12 (Mrs. 
Philip Weems) has a daughter, Margaret, born 
last month. 

Margaret Fabian is abroad with the Amer- 
ican Red Cross. She is a volunteer nurses' aid. 
Lieut. Frank H. Ristine, A. E. F., husband of 
Katherine Longwell, has returned from France. 
Mr. and Mrs. Ristine are living at 708 James 
Street, Syracuse, N. Y. 

Margaret T. Corwin has given up her work 
as assistant superintendent of the Woman's 
division of the United States employment serv- 
ice in Connecticut to go across with a Y. M. 
C. A. canteen unit. 



1919] 



News from the Classes 



53 



1913 

Class editor, Miss Nathalie Swift, 21 West 
91st Street, New York City. 

Helen Lee has announced her engagement to 
Ensign Charles Gilbert, U. S. N. Mr. Gilbert 
is in the submarine service. 

Hildegarde Henderson is going out to Santa 
Barbara, Cal., to work in a laboratory which 
Dr. Nathaniel Bowditch Potter is to open 
there. 

Marguerite Bartlett is fellow in American 
history at the University of Pennsylvania. 

Gertrude Hinricks King (Mrs. S. G. King) is 
living at 62 Pierrepont street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Margaret Scruggs Garuth (Mrs. Raymond 
P. Garuth) lost a fourteen months old daughter 
from influenza-pneumonia December 6. 

Apphia Thwing HaGk (Mrs. Ray Hack) has 
a daughter, Apphia Thwing Hack, born Feb- 
ruary 17. 

Helen Richter Elser (Mrs. Maximilan Elser, 
Jr.) is a writer for the children's department of 
the New York Evening Post. 

1914 

Class editor, Miss Ida Pritchett, School of 
Hygiene and Public Health, Johns Hopkins 
University, Baltimore, Md. 

Elizabeth Baldwin has announced her engage- 
ment to Capt. Philip Stimson, Yale 1910, now 
in the A. E. F. Captain Stimson was wounded 
while on active service with the British, two 
years ago. 

Madelaine Fleisher Wolf (Mrs. James Wolf) 
has a daughter, Anne Lindsey, born October 12, 
1918. 

Eugenia Jackson Comey (Mrs. Arthur 
Comey) has a daughter, Katherine, bora 
November 17, 1918. 

Montgomery Arthurs Supplee (Mrs. Frank 
Supplee) has a son, Frank Supplee 3rd, born 
last September. 

Jean Barstow, ex-' 14, was married January 
2, 1919, to Ensign Charles G. Reinhardt, in 
Germantown, Pennsylvania. Mr. Reinhardt 
is stationed at Pensacola, Florida. 

Elizabeth Lord is giving psychological exam- 
inations at U. S. General Hospital No. 30, at 
Plattsburg, New York. 

Elizabeth Colt has announced her engage- 
ment to Dr. Howard Shattuck of New York. 
Dr. Shattuck was graduated from Yale in 1911, 
and later from the College of Physicians and 
Surgeons. He recently returned from France, 



where he served in Col. Joseph A. Blake's 
hospital in Paris, and later with the Second 
Division at the front. 

Mary C. Smith is running a canteen for army 
and navy workers near the Army and Navy 
supply stores on Water street, Philadelphia. 

Christine Brown has given up her work for the 
Y. M. C. A. in France and is now under the 
Red Cross working in a hostess house for French 
officers. 

Mary Schmidt Kurtz ex-'14 (Mrs. William 
Kurtz) has a daughter, Margaret Adele, born 
December 29. 

Ethel Dunham is a resident house officer in 
the Harriet Lane Home for Invalid Children at 
Johns Hopkins, Baltimore. 

Alice Miller Chester (Mrs. William M. 
Chester) is secretary to C. C. Carter, chief of 
the Y. M. C. A. with the American forces in 
France. 

1915 

Class editor, Miss Katherine W. McCollin, 
2213 St. James Place, Philadelphia, Penna. 

1915 Roll of Honor, Foreign Service. Zena 
Blanc, Margaret Bradway, Mary Brownell 
Murphy, Catharine Bryant, Lucile Davidson, 
Catherine Elwood, Anne Hardon, Alice Hum- 
phrey, Dorothea Moore, Susan Nichols, Esther 
Pugh, Edna Rapallo, Jean Sattler, Atala 
Scudder Davison, Eleanor Dougherty, Helene 
Evans. 

Mary Albertson is teaching at the Baldwin 
School this winter and is living with Helen Taf t 
and Emily Noyes at Pen-y-groes. 

Harriet Bradford attended the Association of 
Collegiate Alumnae Conference at St. Louis 
from March 31-April 4. 

Mary Gertrude Brownell was married to Dr. 
Douglas Murphy in Paris on January 23. 

Julia Deming is studying at The Woman's 
Medical College in Philadelphia. 

Sarah Smith Bull (Mrs. Richard S. Bull) has 
a daughter, Ellen, born January 8. 

Mildred Jacobs is Chief Clerk of the American 
International Shipbuilding Corporation at Hog 
Island, Phila. 

Jean Sattler is a Y. M. C. A. Secretary at 
the Foyer du Soldat in Paris. 

Florence Abernethy is assistant to the sales 
engineer at Walker Brothers and Haviland, 
Philadelphia. 

Marguerite Darkow is assistant in Leander 
Observatory, University of Virginia. 



54 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[April 



Marjorie Fyfe is assistant registrar at Mills 
College, Cal. 

Anne Hardon has returned from France 
where she served as a chauffeuse for the French 
Wounded Emergency Fund. 

Miriam Rohrer is historian and librarian at 
Ellis Hospital, Schenectady, N. Y. 

Ruth Tuttle is secretary and member of the 
board of directors of the Perry Knitting Com- 
pany, Perry, N. Y. 

Eugenia Blount, ex-' 15, is a chemist in the 
Harriman Research Laboratory, Roosevelt 
Hospital, New York City. 

Marguerite Jones, ex-' 15, is editor of the 
Motion Picture Studio Directory. 

Hadley Richardson, ex-' 15, is library assist- 
ant in the St. Louis Public Library. 

Marjorie Tyson will be married to Howard 
Forman some time this month. 

Catherine Head Coleman, ex-'15, (Mrs. 
Thomas Emmett Coleman) has a son, Thomas 
Head Coleman, born January 25. 

Ethel Robinson was married to Lieut. Louis 
Hyde, U. S. N. on January 21 in Detroit. 
Angeleine Spence and Emily Van Horn were 
bridesmaids. 

Katherine Streett Robb (Mrs. Henry Robb) 
is teaching English in the Alleghany County 
Academy, Cumberland. Capt. Robb sailed 
for France early in the summer, 1918. 

Hazel Barnett has accepted the position of 
Assistant Principal of the Bedford High School, 
Bedford, Penna. 

Ruth Glenn was married on April, 29, 1918, 
to Lt. Edred Pennell. 

Elizabeth Webb, ex-'15, is assisting her 
brother, who is President of the Memphis Mill- 
ing Company and of the Southern Corn Mills, 
Memphis, Tenn. 

Ruth McKelvey, ex-' 15, is doing interesting 
and much needed work at the Henry Street 
Mission, New York City. 

Margaret Free's work in Washington in the 
personnel department of the Intelligence 
service was over April 1 and she is now at home, 
in Pittsburgh, enjoying a rest after 18 months 
of hard war work. 

Esther Pugh sailed recently for France where 
she will work in the hospital where Susan 
Nichols is working. 

Grace Shafer Able, ex-' 15 (Mrs. Sidney Thorne 
Able) has three children, one daughter and two 
sons. The oldest is 3| years, another, 2 and 
the youngest 3 months. 



1916 

Class editor, Mrs. Webb I. Vorys, Bryn 
Mawr College, Bryn Mawr, Penna. 

Helen Robertson is working for the Red 
Cross Home Service in Providence, R. I. 

Dorothy Turner Tegt (Mrs. August Tegt) 
has a daughter, Dora Virginia. 

Katherine Scriven, ex-' 16, has been abroad 
since October 1917. She was at Nantes doing 
Red Cross canteen work and when the armistice 
was signed she was in the Argonne district. At 
present she is at St. Nazaire continuing her 
canteen work. 

Constance Kellen has returned from France 
where she has been working for the last year. 
She has announced her engagement. 

Elizabeth Brakeley is doing graduate work in 
Chemistry at Columbia University. 

Caroline Crowell is working with the Atlas 
Powder company at Tamaqua, Penna. 

Jean Brandeis, ex-'16, has been working with 
the Children's Protective Association in Louis- 
ville, Ky., for the last year. 

Emily Strauss is teaching Polish, Slavish 
and Irish children in Larksville, Penna. 

Georgette Moses is secretary, to the com- 
mittee on vocational scholarships of the Henry 
Street Settlement, New York City. 

Cornelia McDonald Davis (Mrs. Kenneth 
M. Davis) has a son a year old. She is now 
living in San Francisco. 

Alene Burt is working with the Paul Block 
Company of New York City. 

Fredrika Kellogg was married to Major 
John Hamilton Jowett on Saturday, the first 
of February at Toul, France. 

Helen Chase has returned from France where 
she has been working in one of the hospitals 
for the last 18 months. Her engagement has 
recently been announced to Rufus Rand of 
Minneapolis. 

Rebecca Fordyce has announced her engage- 
ment to Mr. A. F. Gayton of Chicago. Mr. 
Gayton is a civil engineer and is at present in 
Manila. 

Margaret Chase and Eleanor Hill Carpenter 
have finished their government work in Wash- 
ington. On March 18 they sailed on a two 
months cruise to South America. 

Elizabeth Stark is professor of Philosophy 
and Education at Oxford College, Penna. 

Agnes Grabau has a secretarial position in 
the religious bureau of the Y. M. C. A. National 
War Council. Her special work is in connection 



1919] 



News from the Classes 



55 



with the War Industrial Committee which is 
planning to extend its work to all industrial 
concerns. 

Adeline Werner Webb's husband, Capt. 
Webb Vorys has been ordered from Italy to 
Vienna in command of the first food train sent 
into Austria. Capt. Vorys is a member of the 
332d Infantry, the only United States regiment 
in Italy. During President Wilson's visit to 
Italy, Capt. Vorys was in command of the 
detachment of troops which acted as body- 
guard to the President and personally attended 
the President as aide-de-camp at all the public 
functions. 

Marjery Brown ex-' 16 has resigned as in- 
structor of English at Stephens College and is 
taking a course under the National Catholic 
War Council in social service and clinics pre- 
paratory to going abroad. 

1917 

Class editor, Miss Constance Hall, 1755 N 
Street, Washington, D. C. 

Marian Rhoads has taken a position as pri- 
vate secretary to Dr. Horton, a psychologist of 
Ardmore, Penna. 

Jeannette Hollis has a clerical position with 
the Bureau of War Risk Insurance. 

Dorothy Shipley is expecting to sail for 
France the latter part of March. She will be 
with the American Committee for Devastated 
France. 

Caroline Stevens is spending the winter with 
her family at Riverside, Cal. 

Eugenia Holcombe is visiting on a ranch in 
Texas. 

Catharine Casselberry sails from San Fran- 
cisco March 7 for Japan and the East. 

Mildred Willard has a position in the per- 
sonnel department of Strawbridge and Clothier 
of Philadelphia, giving mental tests to the 
employees. 



Florence Iddings Ryan (Mrs. David Ryan) 
is in Washington, D. C, where her husband is 
stationed. 

Sylvia Jelliffe, U. S. N. R. F., has been sta- 
tioned in Washington since the middle of last 
summer. 

Nathalie McFaden Blanton (Mrs. Wyndham 
Blanton) has a son, born in December. 

Gladys Bryant, ex-' 17, is an assistant in the 
New York city branch of the state health 
department. Her special work is on Wasser- 
mann tests. 

Doris Bird is an instructor in English at the 
Drexel Institute, Philadelphia, this winter. 

Ryo Sato is teaching chemistry, physics and 
mathematics at the Friend School in Tokyo, 
where she was educated. She is also chairman 
of the W. C. T. U. and an active member of 
the Japanese committee for relief in Siberia. 

Romaine Mcllvaine Randall (Mrs. Blanchard 
Randall) has a son, born last month. 

Margery Scattergood who has been in France 
since June 1917, is returning to this country 
this month. 

1918 

Class editor, Miss Virginia Kneeland, 117 
East 60th Street, New York City. 

Adelaide Shaffer is a reconstruction aide at 
the U. S. General Hospital No. 11, Cape May, 
New Jersey. She took a course in physio- 
therapy last summer at Columbia. 

Elizabeth Houghton is working for the 
League of Free Nations Associations of Massa- 
chusetts. She is in charge of the educational 
campaign, covering the labor unions of Boston. 
She arranges for and gives it minute speeches 
at union meetings, and answers questions from 
the floor, and secures resolutions of support. 
Miss Houghton is also treasurer of the Women's 
Trade Union League of Boston. Before taking 
up this work, she worked in a machine shop. 

Helen Butterfield is assistant computer in 
the valuation department of the New York 
Central Railroad. 



56 The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly [April 

BRYN MAWR AUTHORS AND THEIR BOOKS 



The Bryn Mawr Review 

It hurt a great many alumnae to hear that 
the Tipyn o' Bob was dead. All who have 
come through Pembroke Arch as freshmen and 
gone out as alumnae since 1903 have known 
the Tipyn o' Bob. Many of them have con- 
fided to its pages their first much labored and 
well beloved literary flights, and to have it go 
out of college life is a shock much like the 
passing of some old friend. 

No one will deny that Tip had been ailing 
for many years. The contributions were 
rather forced, as if written to fulfill the re- 
quirements of so many pages on such and 
such a subject for an English composition 
course. Lack of interest even permeated the 
advertisements which were conventional to 
a degree and constantly decreasing in num- 
ber. 

Out of the ashes of Tip, has arisen a new 
college "organ," The Bryn Mawr Review. 
The first issue from a much discussed new 
school of writers at Bryn Mawr was awaited 
with great interest. When it appeared in 
March alumnae were filled with conster- 
nation for, behold, it wore a cover of red, 
only to be described as Bolshevik. 

Radicals at Bryn Mawr have never held 
great power as all alumnae well remember, but 
here was young blood fired by the ideals of 
post-bellum unrest. Alumnae expected to 
find inside a publication to rival Dynamite, 
a monthly printed by the anarchists of 
Columbia University in 1916. 

They found as a frontispiece a cartoon 
entitled "Wilson Receives the Bryn Mawr 
Representative." It showed the president 
rising to greet a Bryn Mawrter in cap, gown 
and spectacles who said "Cheer up, Wood- 
row, BRYN MAWR is with you!" Below 
was the line," As We Would Wish." 

Alumnae after this declaration of editorial 
policy may set the Bryn Mawr Review down 
as liberal and no worse. 

The Review like its predecessors is a literary 
magazine, short stories and poetry form the 
bulk of its contents. Particular stress is 
laid on new books and a really good list of 
latest publications is printed with short 
reviews. 

New life there certainly is in the red monthly. 
Interest in writing for the sake of writing can 



not be denied. All of the contributions are 
creditable and many of them of decided 
merit 

A Little Gray Home in France. By Helen 

D. Gibbons, Century Co. 

Alumnae who enjoyed reading the article 
in the January Quarterly entitled "Sol- 
diers Find Night's Lodging" by Helen Daven- 
port Brown Gibbons, ex-'06 (Mrs. Herbert 
Adams Gibbons), will be interested to follow 
the fortunes of her "tumble-down nest" in 
her latest book, A Little Gray Home in France, 
published recently by Century Company. 

Although a copy of the book has not yet 
reached The Quarterly, a letter from Mrs. 
Gibbons dated March 19th, from 120 Boule- 
vard Montparnasse, Paris, tells of the latest 
honor which has fallen to her. She has been 
asked by the Roumanian government to go 
to Roumania to write up conditions there. 
She expected to leave Paris late in March. 

Bogos Nubar Pasha, the head of the Ar- 
menian Delegation, in Paris, has had a special 
European edition of her book, The Red Rugs 
of Tarsus, printed for distribution among the 
American soldiers in France and for other 
propaganda purposes. 

The year of 1918-1919 has been a busy one 
for this Bryn Mawr author. Last summer 
Harpers Magazine printed her translation of 
Abbe* Klein's article on Alsace Lorraine. Mrs. 
Gibbons made a visit to Alsace Lorraine at 
the request of the French government just 
before completing this work. Century Maga- 
zine printed in September, 1918, "The Con- 
fessions of a Grafting Wife;" in February, 
1919, "He Learned French from a Laundress;" 
and in March, 1919, "A Holy City." In 
April or May, they will publish "The Singing 
Heights." At the present time, Mrs. Gib- 
bons is finishing a translation of a French 
novel, called Parvati. 

Principles of Chemistry Applied to the 
Household . An Elementary Text-B ook . By 
Hannah Teresa Rowley and Helen W. Farrell. 

The authors have written a text-book pri- 
marily for students who are not intending 
to go to college but who need some elementary 
knowledge of chemistry and its application 
to everyday household matters. The book 
is admirable in its arrangement and its sim- 



1919] 



Brvn Mawr Authors and Their Books 



57 



plicity of presentation. Part I contains the 
fundamentals of chemistry, very clearly told; 
Part II contains the applications of principles 
set forth in the first part, to the household. 
In both parts theory is illustrated and con- 
firmed by suitable experiments. 

It is difficult in an elementary text to state 
the facts completely enough so as not to give 
the students incorrect notions. In the main 
the authors have succeeded in expressing 
fundamentals both simply and correctly, so 
that one is rather surprised to find several 
exceptions in the chapter on Proteins. The 
statement (p. 164) that "heat decreases the 
solubility and therefore the digestibility of 
proteins," is incorrect. This is shown by 
the fact that the first stage in the digestion of 
milk is coagulation; further, coagulated egg- 
white is no more indigestible than uncoagulated 
albumen. On page 165 the authors state that 
"The meat of freshly killed animals is tough, 
and becomes more tender after a few days 
because by bacterial action acids are formed in 
it which soften the collagen." Such an ex- 
planation does not touch upon the significant 
process at all. Meat which has been kept 
sterile will nevertheless at ordinary tempera- 
tures soften and finally liquify by autolysis 
or self -digestion. Lactic acid forms in the 
tissue as the result of death changes and cat- 
alyzes the autolytic process. Again, the state- 
ment on p. 168-9 that proteosesand peptones are 
"absorbed by the capillaries of the intestinal 
wall" is not true. If such partial decomposi- 
tion products of proteins are absorbed into 
the blood stream they cause well-known patho- 
logical changes or even death. Normally 
the nitrogen-containing food is absorbed 
wholly as amino-acids, and from these simple 
building-stones body proteins are constructed. 

In spite of these inaccuracies the book is a 
valuable one, and one which will recommend 
itself to others who are teaching elementary 
chemistry to young students. The most 
admirable feature of the book is the direct 
application of chemical theory to things about 
which the child already knows. 

Mary Mitchell Moore, '15. 

ALUMNAE BOOK COLLECTION 

The Bryn Mawr College Library has recently 
set aside a portion of its book space to be de- 
voted exclusively to the publications of the 
graduates and former students of Bryn Mawr 
and is now endeavoring to complete its set 



of such publications and to see that they are 
kept up-to-date in the future. We feel that 
we should have this collection on our shelves 
for it will be not only a valuable addition to 
our Library and a credit to the college but 
also undoubtedly, a source of interest and 
inspiration to present and future generations 
of undergraduates. 

We earnestly hope that each alumna will 
cooperate with us in this undertaking and 
will send us a copy of any books which she 
has published and reprints of articles or ar- 
ticles which she has written for papers or 
magazines, also that she will send us her 
books and articles in the future as soon as they 
are published. If, for any reason, any alumna 
is unable to do this we shall be greatly indebted 
to her for information in regard to her 
publications. 

Bryn Mawr College Library. 

LETTER FROM DR. DAVID 

To the Editor of The Bryn Mawr Alumnae 
Quarterly. 

Madam: — May I not use your columns to 
call the attention of the alumnae and friends of 
the college to one of the present pressing needs 
of our library? 

As was natural during the war, gifts to the 
library almost ceased. But it will be most 
regretable if our library does not come in for 
its full share of attention and benevolence now 
that we are gradually returning to the normal 
conditions of peace. 

Bryn Mawr enjoys the unique distinction of 
being the only one of the women's colleges 
which devotes itself extensively to graduate 
study and teaching. Yet graduate study can- 
not be maintained at a high level of efficiency 
without a large and growing library. 

The interests developed by the war seem to 
made it imperitive that we should devote more 
attention to the intensive study of modern 
English history. And yet we have not the col- 
lection which above all others is indispensable 
for an advanced study of English history in the 
nineteenth century, namely Hansard's "Par- 
liamentary Debates." This collection is now 
offered on the market, complete in 450 volumes 
from 1803 to 1893 for $1100. And there would 
be little difficulty in obtaining the more recent 
volumns to bring the set up to date for perhaps 
$250 more. 

But the present resources of our library make 
it quite out of the question to purchase this 



58 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[April 



valuable collection out of any regular funds. 
Friends of the college who desire to see it 
strengthened on the side of graduate study and 
research particularly in the field of modern 
English history would be rendering an incal- 
culable service by making it possible for our 
hard pressed library to obtain Hansard's "Par- 
liamentary Debates." 

Charles Wendell David, 
Bryn Mawr College, 

Department of History. 

ADDRESS UNKNOWN 



A. 



Andrews, E. A. F. 
Archbald, A. 
Arnold, D. H. C. 
Ashburner, E. 
Bacon, E. M. 
Barnes, A. C. 
Barritt, J. E. 
Bash, A. B. 



Battersby, E. J. 
Belart, H. 
Beyfuss, M. F. B. 
Bibb, G. B. 
Brand, H. P. 
Briggs, H. G. 
Briggs, N. 
Bunker, M. R. 



Butler, F. H. 
Clark, Z. E. 
Clough, I. P. 
Cooper, I. R. 
Dexrud, O. C. 
Downing, M. 
Emmons, E. W. 
Emory, L. V. B. 
Goddard, G. 
Goldsmith, S. 
Hann, A. T. 
Hattersley, M. 
Hulbert, N. M. 
Hunnicutt, G. O. 
Iringer, I. L. 
Jones, G. L. 
Kimball, M. H. 
King, M. G. 
Lark, M. L. 
Lawatschek, E. W. 
Lucas, E. 



Lucy, S. B. 
Lynch, N. 
Mabury, B. 
Mayhew, V. A. 
Montgomery, H. M. 
Moore, E. B. 
Orvis, G. S. 
Rendel, F. E. 
Schmidt, A. 
Shipley, M. E. 
Sollenberger, M. 
Southerland, H. R. 
Steenberg, B. 
Sweet, M. 
Upperman, E. B. 
Urdahl, M. 
Van Reypen, A. L. 
Willett, J. L. 
Winterbotham, G. F. 
Wolcott, L. 
Yardley, V. G. 



The Shipley School 

Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania 



Preparatory to Bryn Mawr College 



Alice G. Howland, 
Eleanor 0. Brownell, 

Principals. 

LAKEWOOD HALL 

LAKEWOOD, N. J. 

A College Preparatory School for 

Girls. Carefully planned 

General Courses 

Principal 

Lisa B. Converse, 

A.B. Bryn Mawr College 

THE MISSES KIRK'S 

College Preparatory School 

Bryn Mawr Ave. and Old Lancaster Road 

Bryn Mawr, Pa. 
Number of boarders limited. Com- 
bines advantages of school life with 
private instruction. Individual schedule 
arranged for each pupil. 

All teachers thoroughly familiar with 
college preparatory work. Frequent 
examinations by Bryn Mawr College 
professors. 
Gymnastics and outdoor games. 



The Baldwin School 



A Country School 
for Girls 



Bryn Mawr 
Pennsylvania 
Ten miles from Philadelphia. Fire- 
proof Stone Building. Outdoor Gym- 
nasium. Winter Basketball Field 
Outdoor and Indoor Classrooms 
Extensive Grounds. 
Preparation for Bryn Mawr, Mount Holyoke, 
Smith, Vassar and Wellesley colleges. Also 
a strong general course. Within 26 years 272 
students from this school have entered Bryn 
Mawr College. Abundant outdoor life — 
hockey, basketball, tennis, riding. 

Elizabeth Forrest Johnson, A.B.. 
Head of the School 



MISS MADEIRA'S SCHOOL 
1330 19th St., N. W. Washington, D. C. 



A Resident and Day School 
for Girls 

LUCY MADEIRA WING, A.B. 

MRS. DAVID LAFOREST WING 
Head Mistress 



MISS BEARD'S SCHOOL 

Situated in one of the most healthful and 
beautiful of the New York suburbs, 
Orange, N. J. This school offers the 
advantages of country and city alike. 

College Preparatory, Special, and Grad- 
uate Courses. Gymnasium, Music 
and Art Studios. Domestic Arts. 

Write for Illustrated Catalogue 

Address 

Miss Lucie C. Beard Orange, N. J. 



The Ethel Walker School, Inc. 

SIMSBURY, CONNECTICUT 

Head of School 

ETHEL M. WALKER 

A.M. BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 



Kindly mention the Quarterly 



St. Timothy's School for Girls 



CATONSVILLE. MD. 



Re-opened September, 1917 



Closes June, 1918 



Prepares for College, preferably 
Bryn Mawr. 



MISS WRIGHTS SCHOOL 
FOR GIRLS 

Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Prepares for Bryn Mawr with certifi- 
cate privileges for other 
colleges 



Rosemary Hall 

Founded 1890 

No elective courses 

Prepares for college 

Preferably Bryn Mawr 

Caroline Ruutz-Rees, Ph.D. - ) u j««- a 
Mary E. Lowndes, Litt.D. j Head M » tr « Me » 

GREENWICH. CONNECTICUT 



THE AGNES IRWIN SCHOOL 

2011 DE LANCEY PLACE 
PHILADELPHIA 

Prepares for Bryn Mawr, Smith, 
Vassar and Wellesley 
Colleges. 



JOSEPHINE A. NATT. Head-MUtreM 
BERTHA M. LAWS. Secretary.Trea.urer. 



MISS COWLES* SCHOOL FOR GIRLS 

(Highland Hall) 
Emma Milton Cowles, A.B., Head of School 

Preparatory to Bryn Mawr, Welles- 
ley, Vassar, Smith and Mount Hol- 
yoke. Certificate privilege. Also 
strong general course. Music, Art, 
and Domestic Science. Healthful 
location, 1000 feet altitude. New 
sleeping porch. Gymnasium, swim- 
ming pool. Catalogue. 

Address the Secretary 
Pennsylvania - - Hollidaysburg 



Rogers Hall School for girls 



FACES ROGERS FORT HILL PARK 



38 MINUTES FROM BOSTON 



"PHOROUGH preparation for Bryn Mawr and other colleges. Rogers 

Hall is now represented in Bryn Mawr, Radcliffe, Smith, Vassar, 

Wellesley, University of Wisconsin, and University of Chicago. Large 

grounds for outdoor sports. Experienced instructors in charge of all 

athletics. New Gymnasium and Swimming Pool. For catalogue, address 

MISS OLIVE SEWALL PARSONS, Principal LOWELL, MASS. 



Kindly mention the Quarterly 
ii 



By a Former Bryn Mawr Student 

A Little Gray Home 
In France 

By HELEN DAVENPORT GIBBONS 

Author of "The Red Rugs of Tarsus" 



tfifThe author, with her husband and four children, occupied a 
little chateau near St. Nazaire in the summer of 191 8. She 
believed in treating American doughboys from nearby camps 
quite special. The little chateau became a sort of home to 
many of them. Mrs. Gibbons in a simple, easy, entirely 
human way, has achieved the task of getting the American 
doughboy on paper — what he thinks of France, what he felt 
about the war, what France thinks about him, etc., etc. It 
is a book of the heart that will touch the emotions of readers 
and fill them with the impulse to tell others about it. The 
verdict of the professional readers in the Century Co. was 
unanimous. 



#tt The author describes her methods thus in her foreword to the 
-^book: "in the study of my Little Gray Home in France is 
an old Brittany wardrobe. The boys toast their toes at the 
fire-place beside it. When they stop for a breathing space 
they tell me what they think and see. On a shelf are paper 
and pencil, and when I go there to get out chocolate or a 
new pair of woolen socks, I scratch down hastily what my 
boys have said." 



12mo, 258 pages. Frontispiece. Price $1.50 



At All Bookstores HPU ^ f^ ^ ^ 4-* -■ *-^-r C^ ^ 353 FOURTH AVE 

Published by ine V^entUry <UO. New York City 







RYN MAWR 
ALUMNAE 



QUARTERLY 



Vol. XIII 



JULY, 1919 



No 2 




•"a* TWIWMS «>*•»"* 



Published by the Alumnae Association 

of 
Bryn Mawr College 



THE BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE 
QUARTERLY 

Editor-in-Chief 

Isabel Foster, '15 

Waterbury, Connecticut 

TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Bryn Mawr Faculty Million Dollar Campaign 59 

Drive for Victory Chair of French 60 

Commencement Week 62 

Address by President Thomas 66 

Award of Fellowships 70 

Twelve Classes Hold Reunions 75 

Campus Notes 88 

In Memoriam 91 

Alumna Works for College Clue in Paris 92 

News from the Clubs 93 

News from the Classes 94 

Bryn Mawr Authors and Their Books 102 

Contributions to the Quarterly, books for review, and subscriptions should be sent to 
the Editor-in-Chief, Isabel Foster, The Republican, Waterbury, Conn. Cheques should be 
drawn payable to Bertha S. Ehlers, 123 Waverly Place, New York City. The Quarterly 
is published in January, April, July and November of each year. The price of subscription 
is one dollar a year, and single copies are sold for twenty-five cents each. Any failure 
to receive numbers of the Quarterly should be reported promptly to the Editor. Changes 
of address should be reported to the Editor not later than the first day of each month 
of issue. News items may be sent to the Editors. 

The address of the secretary of the Alumnae Association has been changed. It is now, 
Miss Katherine McCollin, 2213 St. James Place, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Copyright, 1919, by the Alumnae Association of Bryn Mawr College 




Marion Reilly 



THE BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE 
QUARTERLY 



VOLUME XIII 



JULY, 1919 



No. 2 



BRYN MAWR FACULTY MILLION DOLLAR CAMPAIGN FOR SALARIES 



An additional endowment of $1,000,000 is 
needed at once in order to pay the teachers of 
Bryn Mawr College a living wage. The Fac- 
ulty, with the cooperation of the Directors 
and the Alumnae, have determined to try to 
raise this amount. 

At present the salaries of teachers range from 
a minimum of $1000 to a maximum of $3000. 

Since the opening of the college in 1885, 
salaries of full professors have been advanced 
only 20 per cent; of associated professors only 
25 per cent; of those below the rank of associate 
professor from 10 per cent to 33 per cent. 
Meanwhile the cost of living has advanced at 
least 90 per cent. 

Since the beginning of the War the salaries of 
full professors have not been advanced at all, 
while the cost of living has advanced from 60 
to 70 per cent. 

A decent degree of comfort, which is mani- 
festly necessary in order that teachers may 
devote their best energies to professional work, 
is unattainable on the present salary. This 
year a number of the full professors have had 
to give up their houses, and some have had to 
use their savings or borrow money in order to 
live. 

The income from Mrs. Russell Sage's bequest, 
when it becomes available, will increase salaries 
only 12£ per cent. An additional endowment 
of $1,000,000 would raise the salaries of the 
entire teaching staff 25 per cent. 

The present salaries prevent many men and 
women who are best qualified for teaching 
from entering the profession. Bryn Mawr 
College, as well as other institutions of learn- 
ing in this country, must now begin to recruit 
faculties from among those of inferior ability. 

Bryn Mawr is of relatively recent foundation, 
with comparatively few alumnae, and among 
the alumnae there are few women of great 



wealth. To meet the present critical need, 
therefore, this appeal is directed to the larger 
public of generous impulses, who are interested 
in the cause of higher education and especially 
in the higher education of women. 

A gift of $100,000 will endow a chair, with 
the right to attach a name to it as a memorial 
or benefaction. Smaller sums can be commem- 
orated in various ways. 

The Faculty begs your assistance in raising 
this endowment. If you cannot yourself give, 
you are asked to send the names of persons 
who would give if they could be interested. 

A detailed statement of the work of Bryn 
Mawr College and of its present financial need 
is in preparation and will be sent on request. 

Communications may be sent to the under- 
signed or to any member of the Faculty. 

Mr. Asa S. Wing has consented to act as 
Treasurer of the Million Dollar Fund. 
On behalf of the Faculty: 
Arthur Leslie Wheeler 
Bryn Mawr College, Bryn Mawr,Penna. 
On behalf of the Directors: 
Asa S. Wing, 
President's Office, Provident Life and 
Trust Company, Philadelphia, Penna. 
On behalf of the Alumnae Association : 
Louise Congdon Francis (Mrs. Rich- 
ard S. Francis,) Bryn Mawr, Penna. 
This appeal was distributed with the pro- 
grams of Conferring of Degrees on Commence- 
ment Day and will be used for the Faculty 
Campaign which is being launched this summer. 
The organization for the Drive is as follows: 

1. A Faculty Committee of fifteen of which 
President Thomas is Chairman. (During Pres- 
ident Thomas's absence Dean Taft will be 
Acting Chairman) 

2. A Joint Executive Committee of Faculty, 
Directors and Alumnae 



59 



60 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[July 



For the Faculty: 

Professor Wheeler, 

Dean Taft, 

Professor Kingsbury, 
For the Directors: 

Mr. Asa S. Wing, 

Mr. Frederic H. Strawbridge, 

Miss Marion Reilly. 
For the Alumnae 

Mrs. Richard S. Francis, 

Miss Martha G. Thomas, 

Mr. Jacques Vauclain. 
The Alumnae office at Taylor Hall, Bryn 
Mawr will be used as mailing and filing head- 
quarters for the Campaign and Bertha S. Ehlers, 
Executive Secretary of the Alumnae Associa- 
tion, will act as Secretary for the Joint Com- 
mittee. 

The Alumnae Association hope to cooperate 
as much as possible and the Alumnae Committee 
feels that the first step in this cooperation 
must be the strengthening of our organization 
throughout the country and the stimulation 
of Bryn Mawr interest and activity in groups 
or Bryn Mawr Clubs in as many communities 
as possible. Such groups and clubs — and of 
course all individual alumnae — are asked: 

1. To send at once to Bertha S. Ehlers, 
Taylor Hall, Bryn Mawr (and to supplement 
from time to time) — lists of persons who might 
be asked to contribute to the Fund, together 
with useful information concerning their inter- 
ests and the amount for which they should be 
asked. 

2. To supply introductions for members of 
the Faculty who are sent to interview possible 
donors. Alumnae who are willing thus to intro- 
duce members of the Faculty are also asked to 
notify Miss Ehlers. 

Any suggestions that might be helpful in 
this Campaign will gladly be received by the 
members of the Alumnae committee or by 
Miss Ehlers as Secretary for the Joint com- 
mittee. 

DRIVE FOR VICTORY CHAIR OF FRENCH 
REACHES FIFTY THOUSAND DOLLARS 

Bryn Mawr alumnae have never been for- 
gotten or been allowed to forget the impor- 
tance of endowment. We all know that the 
present crisis is keen. A new scale of prices 
has come: a new scale of salaries must come if 
Bryn Mawr is to keep her high academic stand- 
ard. The endowment of the Victory Chair of 
French will release money now being used in 



the French Department and this will be used 
to increase other academic salaries which with- 
out this additional endowment could not have 
been increased. 

The response of the Alumnae to this need 
has been striking. Between April 17 and June 
17 over $50,000 has been raised — all but about 
$11,000— and to be credited to the Classes them- 
selves. Of this $50,000 approximately half 
was subscribed during the time of Class Re- 
unions between May 31 and June 5. Three 
classes 1915, 1917, and 1918 pledged $5000 for 
the Victory Chair at their class suppers, and one 
class, 1912, has pledged itself to raise $25,000 
by the time of its tenth reunion in 1922 (this 
last amount is not included in the figures given 
below). 

The Fund of the Victory Drive stood as 
follows on June 17: 

Amounts paid and pledged (as it has not yet 
been possible to complete the double classi- 
fication of districts and classes, amounts given 
by friends have been credited to districts unless 
they were assigned by request of the class of 
the Alumnae through whom the subscription 
was made, and all gifts from alumnae them- 
selves have as yet been credited only to their 

classes. 

Paid or 
Class pledged. 

1889 $480 

1890 25 

1891 610 

1892 150 

1893 1,200 

1894 362 

1895 517 

1896 1,103 

1897 1,075 

1898 870 

1899 1,554 

1900 694 

1901 1,296 

1902 2,535 

1903 645 

1904 1,499 

1905 477 

1906 895 

1907 578 

1908 2,009 

1909 1,032 

1910 280 

1911 1,055 , 

1912 759 

1913 179 

1914 1,550 



1919] 



Million Dollar Campaign 



61 



1915 5,000 

1916 602 

1917 5,000 

1918 5,328 

1919 150 

1921 100 

Ph.D's 23 

Former graduate students 113 

Alumnae teaching at Vassar 45. 

Alumnae teaching at the Baldwin 

School 100 

Parents of undergraduates inter- 
ested in French 400 

District contributions exclusive of 

gifts credited to classes 

Baltimore 500 

Boston 1,855 

California 100 

Indiana 100 

New York 300 

Ohio 350 

Philadelphia 6,330 

St. Louis 70 

Chicago 1,737 

Oregon 250 

Faculty of Bryn Mawr College 2000* 

Balance class collections 1918 $8,500 

Total $62,382 

*This sum was contributed by two members 
of the faculty as the first gift to Bryn Mawr 
Faculty Million Dollar Campaign for Salaries, 
and was generously transferred to this fund in 
order to help in its completion. 

This means $37,610 still to get— if possible 
before the summer is over. In many cases 
Alumnae themselves have given all they can 
but there are still individual Alumnae and 
friends of Alumnae who have not been reached. 
Any suggestions as to means of completing the 
fund as well as further contributions will be 
gratefully received by the class collectors or 
by members of the Finance committee. 

OFFICERS AND COMMITTEES 

Officers, 1918-1920 

President , Louise Congdon Francis (Mrs. 
Richard S. Francis), '00, Bryn Mawr, Penna. 

Vice-President, Johanna Kroeber Mosen- 
thal (Mrs. Herman O. Mosenthal), '00, 320 
Central Park West, New York City, New York. 

Recording Secretary, Hilda W. Smith, '10, 
Bryn Mawr, Penna. 



Corresponding Secretary, Katharine W. Mc- 
Collin, '15, 2213 St. James Place, Philadel- 
phia, Penna. 

Treasurer, Bertha S. Ehlers, '09, Taylor 
Hall, Bryn Mawr, Penna. 

members of the academic committee 

Frances Browne, '09, Chairman 1918-1922 

Esther Lowenthal, '05 1918-1922 

Elizabeth Sergeant 1919-1923 

Janet Howell Clark, '06 1919-1923 

Helen Sandison, '06 1919-1923 

Mary Breed, '92 1919-1921 

Marion Crane Carrol, '12 1919-1920 

Louise Congdon Francis ex officio 

Eleanor Fleisher Riesman, '03, to serve for 

Elizabeth Sergeant until her return from 

France. 

conference committee 

Gertrude B. Barrows, Chairman. . 1918-1919 

Alice Patterson 1918-1919 

Mary PrERCE 1918-1919 

Myra Elliott Vauclain 1918-1919 

loan fund committee 

Martha G. Thomas 1916-1921 

Mary C. Smith 1918-1920 

Doris Earle 1917-1922 

Alice Patterson 1919-1924 

Elizabeth Maguire 1918-1923 

committee on athletics 

Maude Dessau, Chairman 1915-1920 

Mary G. Branson 1918-1921 

Alice Hawkins 1918-1922 

Louise Marshall Mallery 1919-1924 

Marion Kirk 1919-1923 

james e. rhoads scholarships committee 

Lucy Martin Donnelly 1919-1922 

Marion Paris Smith, Chairman. . . .1917-1920 
Emily Glfford Noyes 1919-1921 

NOMINATING COMMITTEE 

Cornelia Halsey Kellogg 1919-1923 

Elizabeth Lewis Otey 1917-1921 

Alice Hearne Rockwell 1917-1921 

Josephine Niles McClellan 1917-1921 

Antoinette Cannon 1919-1923 



62 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[July 



DIRECTORS APPOINT BERTHA S. EHLERS 
EXECUTIVE SECRETARY 

It has long been the opinion of officers of 
the Alumnae Association, and of others inti- 
mately connected with its work, that the organ- 
ization has outgrown its original method. The 
routine work is now of such great quantity that 
it is almost impossible for volunteer officers 
to accomplish it satisfactorily, and inevitably 
no time is left them for strengthening the organ- 
ization or for instituting progressive policies. 
The Victory Drive, which— though the $100,000 
is not complete — accomplished an astonishing 
amount, has now convinced the Board of 
Directors beyond a doubt that the gaps that 
do exist in Byrn Mawr interest and enthusiasm 
are due to the incompleteness of our organi- 
ation, and that our organization cannot be 
perfected without an active Alumnae office 
with a secretary whose entire time can be put 
upon the business of the Association. 

At a meeting on May 3, therefore the Board 
of Directors of the Alumnae Association ap- 
pointed Bertha S. Ehlers, 1909 executive sec- 



retary to carry on the business of the Associa- 
tion in the Alumnae Office at Taylor Hall. 
Details of the work and methods of financing 
the office have not yet been worked out but a 
plan should be ready by Fall. 

MEETING WITH CLASS OFFICERS 

The meeting of the class presidents and the 
class collectors with the Board of Directors on 
May 31 was such a helpful and stimulating one 
that the Board has decided to hold biennial 
meetings of the same type. The officers of the 
Association therefore wish to invite the class 
presidents and the class collectors to meet with 
them early in November. The exact date will 
be designated and the class presidents notified 
early in October. 

Miss Donnelly has been appointed as the 
Alumnae representative on the A. C. A. Re- 
organization committee. The A. C. A. is to be 
reorganized as an international association of 
university women. 



COMMENCEMENT WEEK AT BRYN MAWR 



With examinations over and every train com- 
ing to Bryn Mawr from east and west bringing 
happy alumnae, Commencement week ceremo- 
nies and festivities began on the afternoon of 
the last day of May. 

The presidents of classes holding reunions 
met with the board of directors of the alumnae 
association in the afternoon and later many of 
the classes held meetings at which the Million 
Dollar Endowment drive and the Victory Chair 
in French were common matters of business 
and discussion. Dr. Leuba spoke at several of 
these meetings. Six classes held reunion sup- 
pers that night, 1904, 1909, 1911, 1914, 1915 
and 1917. 

The alumnae as individuals attended bacca- 
laureate in good numbers. Dr. Andrew Mutch 
spoke of the need of action in the present day 
crisis. 

On Monday the alumnae athletes got to- 
gether for basket ball practice and began the 
tennis tournament. Class suppers were held 
that evening by 1899, 1908, 1916, 1918 and 
1919. 



ALUMNAE DAY ATHLETICS 

Tuesday was alumnae day, or as the under- 
graduates will have it, athletic day. With 
class colors rampant and in costume, the alum- 
nae marched from Taylor Hall to the lower 
hockey field, where the usual defeat was bravely 
met by the team of old timers, and was not too 
easily won by varsity. The score was 8 to 10. 

After the awarding of the undergraduate cups 
of which there are a surprising number now- 
adays, Miss Applebee had a surprise for the 
alumnae. A special prize was offered for the 
class with the highest percentage of children 
per person per year since graduation. It was 
carried off with delight by 1911 whose members, 
85 in all when they were freshmen, have 85 
children now. This makes 0.11 of a child a 
piece, or more than one to every ten for every 
year. The class of 1908 came next with 100 in 
the class, 112 children now which makes 0.10 
of a child apiece. 1904 and 1909 have 0.06 
apiece; 1912 and 1914 have 0.07; 1915 has 0.05; 
1916 has 0.03 and 1918 has 0.04. 



1919] 



Commencement Week 



63 



The prize for the best reunion costume went 
to 1899 which wore a green voile scarf and broad- 
brimmed ecru straw hat with a green streamer. 
The costume was designed by Carolyn Brown 
Radnor-Lewis, who is a member of the adver- 
tising department of the Mallison Silk Company. 

RECORD ALUMNAE SUPPER 

The largest alumnae supper in the history of 
the college was held on Tuesday evening in the 
gymnasium. Georgiana Biddle, '09, was the 
toastmistress and at her side sat President 
Thomas as guest of honor. Among the speak- 
ers were: Dr. de Laguna, Dr. Wheeler, Margaret 
Thomas Carey, '89, Mary Breed, '94, Emma 
Guffey Miller, '99, Isabel Peters, '04, Theresa 
Helburn, '08, Leah Cadbury, '14, and Marjorie 
Martin, '19. The classes of 1915 and 1917 sang 
instead of furnishing a speaker. 

TOAST BY EMMA GUFFEY MILLER 

One of the most interesting speeches was that 
by Mrs. Miller. It follows in full: 

"When I left Bryn Mawr I had three great 
ambitions; the first was to go around the world, 
the second was to have twin boys, and the third 
was to speak at the Alumnae supper. 

"it took me seven years to attain the first, 
ten years to gain the second, and twenty years 
to realize the third. So now you can see which 
is the hardest to accomplish, but don't scoff, 
1919. See how many of you will come back to 
your twentieth with all your dreams come true. 

"My subject for to-night is '99, Twenty Years 
After! After what? Well after twenty years 
in the world where we think we have done our 
bit for humanity and Bryn Mawr, and when I 
have told you only a few of the things we have 
accomplished, I am sure that you will feel proud 
of us of the 'Middle Ages.' 

"To prove what we have done I shall give 
you some statistics taken not only from the 
infallible Bryn Mawr Register, but from the 
war records of the United States, Great Britain, 
and France, for you have to travel world-wide 
to find out all '99 is doing. 

"Now our class just naturally divided itself 
into three parts: the upper ten, the lower ten, 
and the great middle. 

"The upper ten included those who never 
received anything below credit, the lower ten 



those who never received anything higher than 
passed, and the great middle those whose high- 
est ambition was to receive the order of merit. 

"The upper ten now includes three lawyers, 
two doctors, two suffrage presidents, four Ph.D.'s, 
three college professors, one farmer and of 
course one European Fellow who did two very 
unusual things, married and had three children. 

"Now as to the lower ten, and for you of 1919 
who never had your names read out in chapel, 
their careers will come as an inspiration to future 
glory. 

"Did you ever notice that the speakers at 
these suppers are invariably taken from the 
lowest in the class? Here am I and tomorrow 
you may hear another at College Breakfast. 

"But it is of the other eight I wish to speak 
for of them there is much to tell of courage and 
renown, for they have all been 'over there.' 

"They went as Red Cross and Y. M. and Y. 
W. C. A. workers and one, Camille Erisman, has 
done work among the war prisoners in Switzer- 
land since 1914. 

"Ellen Kilpatrick was one of the first to go 
after we entered the war. She first did canteen 
work at St. Germain, and later at Bordeaux with 
one assistant, in a canteen fitted to care for 150 
men she fed 1500 men daily when the flies were 
so thick and the heat so intense that the dough 
boys said the atmosphere hummed worse than 
machine guns. 

"in Italy's darkest hour a '99-er determined 
to save the situation. She was doing Red 
Cross work in France but the conditions were 
so bad, the Red Cross refused to send any one to 
Italy, so she transferred to the 'Y' and landed 
in Verona. And when Bess Bissell arrived the 
Italian landscape took on a fairer hue. Later 
she was at Fiume, and had she only been kept 
there Orlando Fiumioso might have been less 
rapacious at the Peace Table. 

"Margaret Hall worked under heavy fire at 
the canteen in Chalons last September, and 
afterward had the good fortune to be in Alsace 
when the French marched in. 

"Mary Hoyt was another who went abroad 
early in the war. She went into a hospital 
rolling bandages and came out a first class sur- 
gical nurse. And for bravery, one night under 
fire when the hospital was bombed, this hap- 
pened at 11.20 every night, and she herself was 
wounded, she has been recommended for the 
Croix de Guerre. 



64 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[July 



"Amy Steiner and Marion Ream are on the 
other side making life worth while for the home- 
sick boys still there, the former in a canteen 
built in one corner of a bombarded house at 
St. Quentin, the latter with our army on the 
Rhine. 

"The last of the eight is a Y. M. C. A. 
worker who has been with the Army of the First 
Division for over a year. And General Barker, 
its commander, says she has been as valuable 
as any member of his staff. His were the first 
troops ordered into Germany, and when the 
order came the men refused to move without 
their canteen manager, so she was obliged to go 
too, and thus it is a matter of record in Wash- 
ington that the very first woman to go into Ger- 
many after the armistice, was a Bryn Mawr girl, 
Gertrude Ely of '99. 

Middle Class of 1899 

"Now you have heard of the upper ten, the 
brave lower ten but what of the Great Middle, 
who like all middle classes form the back bone 
of Anglo-Saxon civilization. 

"When they left college their motto was, 
'We also serve who only stand and wait.' So 
after more or less standing around and waiting 
to be asked, they all married, and their claim to 
immortality rests on 34 daughters and 52 sons. 

"One of these sons entered Troy Tech at six- 
teen, and another is taking the course at Har- 
vard in three years and will graduate at twenty, 
and our class baby, Helen Dennison, is at pres- 
ent taking her entrance exams in Boston for 
Bryn Mawr. 

"All our other sons and daughters are sched- 
uled for like careers for they are not only fortu- 
nate in having college mothers, but college fathers 
as well. 

Husbands and Fathers 

"And now a word as to these husbands and 
fathers. None was in the first draft but all were 
in the second, though none was called. Many 
volunteered, all did war work; some in Wash- 
ington for $1 a year and some at home for less, 
and six saw service over seas. Four fought un- 
der the Stars and Stripes, one under the Union 
Jack, and one under the Tricolor, and wher- 
ever the work was hardest and the fight hottest 
you could count on these '99 husbands for they 
hadn't lived with us all these years for nothing. 

"When we were in college we had a song 
which ended with the modest line, 'Glorious 



'99.' Now don't you think we have lived up to 
it? But if we have done this much in the first 
twenty years out of college, what won't we do 
in the next for we are just reaching the age when 
we begin to do things. You remember Mark 
Twain says, 'We have no fixed habits until we 
are forty; then they begin to solidify, presently 
they petrify, then business begins.' 

"Meet us here twenty years from now and you 
may hear tales of even greater things accom- 
plished. My time is up but before closing, I 
wish to bear witness for '99 that we never could 
have rendered such service had it not been for 
the years spent under the influence of those two 
great interchangeable and synonymous personal- 
ities, Miss Thomas and Bryn Mawr." 

SERVICE CORPS TEA 

Three other functions of interest to the alum- 
nae occurred on Tuesday. First was a tea in 
honor of the Service Corps and other alumnae 
who have served abroad during the war. It was 
started on the lawn outside of Pembroke West 
but rain necessitated shifting to Pembroke 
East drawing room. Miss Marion Reilly as 
chairman of the joint executive committee was 
hostess and chairman. The speakers were all 
returned war workers. They included Mar- 
garet Bontecue, '09, Esther White, '07, Agnes 
Morrow, '12, and Elizabeth Snyder Charlock. 
Miss White spoke most interestingly on Bol- 
shevism for she has recently returned from 
Russia after a year and a half's most exciting 
service. 

PORTRAIT PRESENTED TO COLLEGE 

Former Dean Marion Reilly 's portrait was 
presented to the college by her class 1901 later 
in the afternoon. The portrait was unveiled in 
the library by Marion Parris Smith, '01, and 
was received by President Thomas in behalf of 
the board of directors of the college. The pres- 
entation speech made by Beatrice McGeorge, 
'01, follows: 

"We, members of the class of 1901, in pre- 
senting Marion Reilly's portrait to Bryn Mawr 
College, enjoy a privilege and confer an honor. 

"At our last reunion, in 1916, which was 
marked by the close of Marion Reilly's term as 
Dean, we decided to make our gift, her por- 
trait. Thereafter came details of choosing a 
painter, of arranging for sittings and the rest. 
Carolyn Daniels Moore dealt admirably with 



1919] 



Commencement Week 



65 



these matters. She regrets extremely that she 
can not be here herself to present the portrait. 
I deplore her absence, but am glad to have the 
opportunity of speaking for her. 

"The portrait committee selected Miss Ce- 
cilia Beaux. Mr. Joseph Pennell says of Miss 
Beaux that while she differs from other painters, 
she is excelled by none in quality. 

"Miss Beaux finished the portrait early last 
winter, exhibited it in Boston, where its distinc- 
tion won many praises, and then brought it to 
Philadelphia as her sole contribution to the an- 
nual exhibition at the Academy of Fine Arts. 
She liked it so much better than any other of 
her recent pictures, that she wished to show it by 
itself. Those of you who saw it in Philadel- 
phia will remember how it took the shine off 
the portraits hanging nearby. 

"The picture then, considered as a painting, 
not only is worthy of being placed opposite a 
portrait by Mr. Sargent but considered as a 
portrait of Marion Reilly, is even more worthy 
of its distinguished neighbors. I can show you 
reasons. 

"When I was compiling the list of our class- 
mate's achievements, I thought of the young 
prince in M. Beaucaire, who said of the mas- 
querading dauphin, after the French ambassador 
had declaimed half a page of splendors: 

Zose are a few of my big Brozzer's title'; it 
take' a strong man two 'ole day' to say zem 
all!" 

"No particular honor attaches to inherited 
honor: great credit crowns the successful com- 
pletion of difficult tasks. Marion Reilly has 
worked for her success. But I cannot tell you 
all her fine deeds; nobody can: she does not con- 
fide. Why should she? She does not want 
people always dogging her footsteps to learn 
her secret of large accomplishment combined 
with suavest calm. 

1901 Discovered Marion Reilly 

"Mark Twain said that Columbus needn't be 
proud of discovering America, he couldn't miss 
it. However, Columbus should get the credit 
of being first to find and use what had lain here 
for many quiet centuries. So our class begs 
credit for discovering Marion's excellence be- 
fore the college did. She was our class presi- 
dent, our representative on the original students' 
building committee, before she was president of 
the philosophical club or vice-president of self- 
government. 



"Her brothers say, of course, that if they hadn't 
taught her to play baseball and bluff at poker, 
in return for arithmetic lessons, she wouldn't 
be where she is today. Her school teachers 
assure me that they had the almost unique ex- 
perience during her recitations, of listening to 
lessons that had been studied and understood. 
From the early days when she stood herself 
very straight and silent in the corner after a 
scolding, through the time when she sat up all 
night in a Pullman berth, happily reading The 
Critique of Pure Reason, she has been unex- 
pected and quiet and reserved. We were play- 
ing auction one day, shortly after President 
Thomas left for Egypt and Marion Reilly was 
so silent that Marion Parris Smith said: 

"Miss Thomas has but left one sphinx for 
another.' 

Student of Symbolic Mathematics 

"That was while Marion Reilly was Dean. 
She was appointed in 1907, while she was 
studying mathematics at Newnham College, 
Cambridge. She always studied mathematics. 
She studied here for four or five years after her 
graduation and she studied in Rome during her 
sabbatical year. Her specialty is symbolic 
mathematics. Only six persons in the world 
understand it. I am not one of the six, but I 
may say from experience that she can make the 
seven spot of diamonds go further than anyone 
else I know. 

"Marion Reilly was Dean of Bryn Mawr 
from 1907 to 1916. Since her resignation she 
has been made director-at-large of Bryn Mawr 
and College counsellor for the Association of 
Collegiate Alumnae. She is chairman of the 
joint administrative committee of the Bryn 
Mawr Service Corps Fund and President of the 
Bureau of Occupations for Trained Women. 

"At her request I withhold the long list of 
her extra-academic trustee and chairmanships. 
Figure her to yourselves as presiding daily at a 
dozen meetings, planning improvements neces- 
sary to lift our city from its squalor. 

"These manifestations are impossible ex- 
cepting to a woman who can act as well as 
think. Her work is her best and happiest 
testimony: we need not remind the college of 
that, yet we cannot quite make of it a pattern 
to hang upon the wall. Therefore we have 
caused a pattern of her appearance to be made. 
This pattern, excellent as it suggests judgment 



66 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[July 



and personality and a gracious courtesy that 
removes the sense of struggle and leaves only 
the achievement, we now offer to our college." 

SITE OF STUDENTS' BUILDING 

The future site of the Students' building 
which has been staked out behind Radnor was 
the scene of a rally late in the afternoon. The 
speakers were Marion Reilly, '01, and Marjorie 
Martin, '19, representing the class which made 
the first move for such a building and the class 
which hopes to put it through. Miss Reilly told 
why it had not been built in the last eight years 
and Miss Martin why it must be built now. 

COLLEGE BREAKFAST 

College breakfast on Wednesday was another 
occasion for breaking of past attendance rec- 
ords. There were about 500 seated in the gym- 
nasium. Winifred Worcester, '21, was the 
toastmistress. Other speakers were: Helene 
Johnson, '19; Anne Buzby Palmer, '04; Frances 
Riker, '21; Baroness von Korff, '00; Mrs. Lucy 
Evans Chew, '18; Helen Huntting, '19; Helen 
Crane, '09; Clorinda Garrison, '21; Marion 
Parris Smith, '01, and Mary Lee Thurman, 
president of 1919. 

CONFERRING OF DEGREES 

William Howard Taft, former president of 
the United States delivered an address on the 
League of Nations after the conferring of de- 
grees on Thursday morning. Two degrees of 
doctor of philosophy were conferred and five 
masters of art. President Thomas spoke as 
follows: 

ADDRESS BY PRESIDENT THOMAS 

"It gives us great pleasure today to welcome 
this large and distinguished audience to our 30th 
Conferring of Degrees at the close of the 34th 
year of Bryn Mawr College. The audience is 
not by any means as large as it wished to be, 
or would have been had we ventured in this 
rainy first week of June to hold commencement 
in the cloister, but it makes up in quality what 
it lacks in quantity. 

''it is cosmopolitan in that it is for the most 
part closely related to our Senior Class and 
therefore comes from every part of the United 
States, north, south, east and west. It is dis- 



tinguished for the same reason because every 
year Bryn Mawr graduates constitute a com- 
paratively small class of young women (87 
today) whose parents and relations, or they 
themselves with the approval of their parents 
and relations, have elected Bryn Mawr as their 
college and have subjected themselves to what 
we at Bryn Mawr like to think is the really 
strenuous discipline of our four years college 
course. To have selected Bryn Mawr as your 
college, or your daughter's college, is in itself, 
we venture to believe, a mark of distinction. 

"As an alumna said yesterday at the alum- 
nae dinner, Bryn Mawr opened 34 years ago 
with a few arid acres of land, three rather fla- 
grantly mid- Victorian buildings with nothing 
Jacobean about them, a tiny endowment, a few 
wonderful professors, a few wonderful students, 
and with nothing else much to speak of except 
plenty of educational standards held high aloft 
and streaming to the skies. 

"It was at the opening of the college that 
James Russell Lowell prophesied that a time 
would surely come when the corridors of build- 
ings yet to be built and- the avenues of trees yet 
to be planted would echo to the tread of the 
immortal feet of scholars, poets and sages, who 
would teach and study here. That time is 
nearly at hand. Already the members of our 
early and later Bryn Mawr faculty have won 
fame, either in Bryn Mawr, or, when Bryn Mawr 
could not hold them, elsewhere. Some of the 
most important chairs at Harvard, Yale, Co- 
lumbia and Chicago — not to speak of the presi- 
dential chair in the White House — are held by 
Bryn Mawr professors who made their reputa- 
tion in Bryn Mawr classrooms. Bryn Mawr 
doctors of philosophy are already among the 
leading women scholars and Bryn Mawr grad- 
uates are to be found making good in every kind 
of profession and occupation. Our endowment, 
totally inadequate as it is, is growing surely if 
slowly by the devoted, self-sacrificing effort of 
our graduates and friends; stately Jacobean 
Gothic buildings, built from gifts with economy 
but due regard to beauty, have taken their 
appointed place covered with ivy on the col- 
lege campus surrounded by trees and flowering 
shrubs and green lawns, and ever, we are proud 
to think, our academic standards wave high 
from all our Jacobean towers. Not once have 
they been lowered in these 34 years. 

"But at the present time academic standards 
are on the firing line. During the last 34 years 
certain supreme questions which are conditions 



1919] 



Commencement Week 



67 



of all future progress have been fought to a 
finish: — women's rights with its inseparable 
corollaries woman suffrage, equal educational op- 
portunity and equal pay for equal work; peace; 
and temperance. It is scarcely too much to 
hope that these three fundamental questions 
will be finally settled — and settled right — almost 
before your generation, members of the gradu- 
ating class, has got well into working harness. 
These three great causes won by our generation 
will be the heritage of your generation. But 
there are other fundamental questious which 
are still wholly unsettled. First among these 
in importance is the question of what kind of 
education shall be given to the next generation. 

"Our Senior Class is a war class. You en- 
tered the college after the war was declared but 
before we fully realized that it was a world war in 
which our highest and best interests were inex- 
tricably involved. Happily for your college 
education you were below the age at which 
women were allowed to serve their country and 
so you stuck bravely to the task of educating 
yourselves. But the effect of all war is unrest. 
Our old education seems to us to have failed to 
avert the terrible cataclysm of war. Our in- 
stinct is to scrap it and all of our past disciplines 
and turn to new and strange gods. All so- 
called vocational and practical studies seem for 
the moment more important. Tremendous 
forces are pressing on colleges and schools to 
lower their requirements and change radically 
their education. Unless we oppose force to 
force and get out and fight for our opinions the 
next generation will lose its intellectual heritage. 

"At Bryn Mawr we have always believed 
that the best education was none too good for 
our students; that a professor could not possibly 
know too much to teach a freshman; and that 
the widest knowledge combined with the keen- 
est interest in research made the best imaginable 
teacher; that a wife and mother could not know 
too much; that even an adoring baby sensed the 
peculiar preciousness of a mother that could 
read Latin; that a busy overworked husband 
enjoyed himself more and relaxed more com- 
pletely with a Bryn Mawr wife than with a mis- 
erably illiterate chorus girl; that there was 
nothing any woman wanted to do that a Bryn 
Mawr woman could not do better because of 
her Bryn Mawr education; that if only Latin, 
English, mathematics, philosophy, and science 
are studied faithfully in college they cannot fail 
to give a kind of general training and capacity 
which makes it possible to learn to do any 



kind of practical work desired with ease and 
intelligence. 

These four years of war have proved this. 
We know now that it is not a fond dream of col- 
lege professors that our traditional college edu- 
cation succeeds in a wholly wonderful way in 
developing human faculty. Successive genera- 
tions of young men and women submitted, some 
eagerly, some even unwillingly, to the discipline 
of a college course have shown conclusively that, 
when measured by the rough and ready competi- 
tion of training camps, canteens, and hospitals 
as well as in the sterner test of the trenches and 
behind the far flung battle lines they have gained 
a kind of ability that other men and women do 
not possess. What is true of war and business 
is infinitely more true of higher things. I know 
no such wives and mothers as college women. 
Happy the husband, happy the child, that gets 
one of them ! 

"We all of us know more or less what educa- 
tion means to ourselves. Those of us that have 
even a little education, prize it as our most pre- 
cious possession. To it we owe whatever ability 
we may have of thinking clearly and consecu- 
tively. It is thi ; kind of sheer intellectual power 
however much or little of it we have, that by its 
possession separates us from other men and 
women and puts us in a class by ourselves. We 
owe to education our wider horizons of interest 
and emotion, our sympathy with history, litera- 
ture and art. But it is when we come to live 
that a college education counts the most. The 
women of my generation and earlier generations 
(I might almost say from the time of Eve until 
the opening of Bryn Maw. and other women's 
colleges) have tried ths so-called practical, ap- 
plied education and we know of what we speak. 
It was only when women were allowed to share 
in the kind of idealistic education that has nur- 
tured the human spirit from the time man first 
appeared as a thinking human being upon the 
earth that our woman's world of petty duties 
and individual interests became transformed 
into a new world of the spirit and intellect. 

"So-called practical studies — chemistry ap- 
plied to daily problems of cooking, or furnaces; 
physics applied to reading lamps or lightning 
rods, the arithmetic of the market and trjp bank 
account — lose in some curious way the inspira- 
tion of theoretical studies. The soul and spirit 
seem to have gone out of them. Teachers of 
such applied studies become in some strange 
way like the business men and women we have 
all known. They too lose the radiant halo that 



68 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[July 



in spite of their many human imperfections 
glorifies the head of a true teacher of the humani- 
ties. Both teachers and pupils become bleak, 
every day kind of persons. There is now, how- 
ever, an almost irresistible trend toward such 
bleak vocational studies and such bleak practical 
teachers. 

"The great question for us today is this. 
Will Bryn Mawr stand firm and continue to teach 
a distinguished little company of women sent 
her each year by their distinguished relations 
who believe in Bryn Mawr's high academic 
standards? The directors, faculty, and alum- 
nae have faith to believe that Bryn Mawr will 
stand firm. 

"All this does not mean that in the right way 
at the right time Bryn Mawr does not believe 
in preparation for one's life work. The only 
two new departments of study Bryn Mawr has 
opened recently prove this. They are first, the 
Graduate Department of Education in which 
Bryn Mawr graduates who wish to teach are 
shown how. In the Phebe Anna Thorne Open 
Air Model School of our Department of Educa- 
tion, housed in the little group of Japanese pago- 
das at the Pembroke gateway we are trying the 
experiment (and succeeding in it too) of making 
the so-called old fashioned preparation for col- 
lege such as we believe in at Bryn Mawr alive 
with new fashioned excitement and interest. 
You will find on your seats circulars of this little 
school with articles and pictures enclosed de- 
scribing the truly wonderful results obtained in 
only six years of work. I beg you to read these 
articles and if you like them and believe in them 
to send us the best childen you know of to be 
taught there. If you are interested, you will 
find in the cloister of the library a model of the 
famous Geisha theatre of Kyoto, Japan, made 
by the best maker of models in all Japan, which 
is to be adapted to our needs and built this sum- 
mer on the Model School grounds to be used by 
the pupils as an open air theatre in which to act 
out their history and English. In the Pagoda 
Sketches (on sale for fifty cents at the Pembroke 
archway and in the Library) you may see for 
yourself what Latin and English literature and 
history may be made to mean to children. The 
result^ of the Model School teaching have con- 
vinced me that we can transform school educa- 
tion if we only try. 

"Bryn Mawr is also making another great 
experiment in what we believe to be the only 
sort of vocational training that should be given 
by colleges like Bryn Mawr. Like our Depart- 



ment of Education it is vocational training 
after the four years college course. The Carola 
Woerishoffer Graduate Department of Social 
Economy and Social Research opened during 
the war in 1915 when we realized first I believe 
of all colleges that next to teaching social work 
was to become the most important and most 
beneficent profession of women. We need 
above everything else in the world leaders in 
social reconstruction. Bolshevism, I. W. W., 
anarchy, revolution, are already howling like a 
pack of savage wolves at our very doors. With- 
out vision and enlightened leadership the people 
perish. 

"But at this very time when they are needed 
as never before, all schools and colleges are fac- 
ing a terrible new danger that strikes at the root 
of all good education. Our school teachers and 
college professors are no longer able to live so 
as to teach their best. The cost of living has 
risen since the war from 60 to 70 per cent. It 
is 90 per cent higher than when Bryn Mawr 
opened. Yet teaching salaries have risen at 
most 20 per cent and often not at all. We need 
the highest ability and the most radiant per- 
sonality in the teaching profession. Both abil- 
ity and personality will desert it under present 
conditions. Teaching will rapidly fall into the 
hands of second rate people who cannot succeed 
in other professions and cannot avoid failing 
even more shockingly in the profession of teach- 
ing. Something must be done and done quickly 
or it will be too late to save the next generation 
of school and college students. The public 
school teachers of Philadelphia are working at 
Wanamaker's, Gimbel's, and Lit's on Saturdays 
and in rush evening hours to get money to buy 
food. Professors in our colleges are spending 
their savings and doing housework, getting their 
wives paying jobs, and living on their fathers and 
mothers, whenever they have any able to sup- 
port them and tarnishing by financial worry 
those halos I have spoken of which are so essen- 
tial to the headgear of the true teacher. The 
situation is acute and terrible. Where else can we 
look for leadership if not to our professors and 
students? And if the inspiration of our col- 
leges runs dry, we are of all nations the most 
miserable. 

"We talk about 25 per cent increases in salary. 
We need 100 per cent increases. Bryn Mawr 
has always stood for the principle that not one 
dollar of endowment shall be taken from teach- 
ing salaries to pay for the food and lodging of 
the students in her dormitories. She has just 



1919] 



Commencement Week 



69 



reaffirmed this principle by increasing her dormi- 
tory charges next year to cover the recent rise in 
the cost of living — but she has no power to in- 
crease the salaries of her faculty to meet this 
increase in faculty living expenses. The alum- 
nae of Bryn Mawr have realized from the first 
the crying need of higher salaries. Their gifts 
to their Alma Mater have always been to raise 
salaries. They are now trying to endow for this 
purpose a Victory Chair of French of the value 
of $100,000 in lasting remembrance of our glori- 
ous ally. Between April 15 and May 31 they 
and their friends have contributed and pledged 
$27,242, and from the 1st to the 5th of June dur- 
ing 14 class reunions the large amount of $33,359 
making a total of $60,601. Of this amount 
$5000 was contributed by members of the class 
of 1918 in memory of their classmates, Louise 
Tunstall Smith and Amelia Richards, who died 
in war service during the year 1918. This gift 
represents great self-sacrifice and profound loy- 
alty to the college on the part of the youngest 
class of our alumnae. I can think of no more 
fitting commemoration by those who are living 
of their comrades who are dead than such a 
memorial. Our heartfelt thanks are due to the 
class of 1918, and to the other classes and don- 
ors of this fund. The Endowment of the 
$100,000 Victory Chair of French will free 
enough income to raise all teaching salaries in 
the college about 4| per cent. 

"The Bryn Mawr Faculty Million Dollar 
Campaign for Salaries, a notice of which you 
will find placed in every seat in the audience, 
will raise all teaching salaries 25 per cent. We 
appeal to our friends to help us to do this. 
Nothing is more bitterly needed not only by Bryn 
Mawr but by all other colleges than adequate 
salaries for its teachers. Our hope of the future 
lies in the coming generation which must make 
good our failures and carry further the outposts 
of civilization and culture. Youth's vision and 
power of service depends in great measure on 
the teachers provided for it by our generation. 
For teachers of the right kind, no salaries can 
possibly be too high." 

CANDIDATES FOR HIGHER DEGREES 

Master of Arts 

Therese Mathilde Born of Indiana. A.B., 
Bryn Mawr College, 1918. Graduate Scholar 
in English, Bryn Mawr College, 1918-19. 

Judith Martha Bassett Hemenway of 
Vermont. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1918. 



Graduate Scholar in French, Bryn Mawr 
College, 1918-1919. 

Cora Snowden Neely of Philadelphia. 
A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1918. Graduate 
Scholar in Latin, Bryn Mawr College, 1918-19. 

Edith Marion Smith of Pennsylvania. 
A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1918. Graduate 
scholar in Greek, Bryn Mawr College, 1918-19. 

Isabel F. Smith of California. A.B., Bryn 
Mawr College, 1915. Teacher in the Wheeler 
School, Providence, R. L, 1915-17. Graduate 
Scholar in Geology, Bryn Mawr College, 1917- 
18 and fellow in Geology, 1918-19. 

Doctor of Philosophy 

Elsie Tobin of New York. B.S., Barnard 
College, 1915. Graduate Scholar in Chemistry, 
Bryn Mawr College, 1915-17, and Fellow in 
Chemistry, 1917-19. 

Margaret Woodbury of Ohio. A.B., Ohio 
State University, 1915. Graduate Scholar in 
History, Bryn Mawr College, 1915-16, 1918-19, 
and Fellow in History, 1916-18. 

Bachelor of Arts 
(3 February 1919: 84 June 1919) 

In the group of Greek and Latin: Ernestine 
Emma Mercer of Philadelphia, magna cum 
laude; Roberta Marie Ray of Iowa; Helen 
Elizabeth Spalding of Michigan, cum laude. 

In the group of Greek and English: Eliza 
Gordon Woodbury of New Hampshire, magna 
cum laude. 

In the group of Latin and English: Edith 
Mary Howes of Philadelphia; Mabel Laf- 
ferty of Philadelphia. 

In the group of Latin and German: Anita 
Louise Adele Ehlers of New Jersey. 

In the group of Latin and Classical Archeol- 
ogy: Virginia Wallis Anderton of Wisconsin; 
Sydney Ott Belville of Philadelphia. 

In the group of English and French: Helen 
Field Conover of Michigan; Jessie Mebane 
of Pennsylvania, cum laude; Edith Rondinella 
of Philadelphia. 

In the group of English and Italian and Span- 
ish: Frances Ekin Allison of Missouri; 
Marjorie Martin of Massachusetts. 

In the group of English and German: Eleanor 
Steward Cooper of Pennsylvania. 

In the group of English and Philosophy: 
Theodosia Haynes of Massachusetts; Mary 
Lee Thurman of Ohio 



70 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[July 



In the group of English and Philosophy and 
Psychology: Mary Morris Ramsay of Delaware; 
Frances Higginson Fuller of New York City; 
Amelia Warner of Ohio. 

In the group of English and Psychology: 
Frederika Beatty of Georgia; Anna Reu- 
benia Dubach of Missouri, cum laude; Cor- 
nelia Hayman of Philadelphia, cum laude; 
Janet Alexina Holmes of Missouri; Helen 
Coreene Karns of Pennsylvania; Mary S af- 
ford Munford of Virginia; Margaret Whit- 
all Rhoads of Philadelphia, cum laude. 

In the group of French and Italian and 
Spanish: 

Sarah Virginia Coombs of New York; 
Elizabeth Maus Fauvre of Indiana; 
Marguerite Olga Schwartz of Philadelphia, 

magna cum laude. 

In the group of French and Spanish : 
Jean Gray Wright of Pennsylvania. 

In the group of French and Modern History : 
Margaret Gilman of Massachusetts, magna 

cum laude; 
Elizabeth Helfenstein Pershing 2d, of 

Pennsylvania (work for this degree completed 

in February) ; 
Helen Redd of Virginia. 

In the group of French and History of Art: 
Marjorie Taylor Mackenzie of Nova Scotia. 

In the group of Italian and Spanish and His- 
tory of Art: 
Ruth Wadsworth Wheeler of Pennsylvania. 

In the group of Spanish and Modern History: 
Frederica Burckle Howell of New Jersey; 
Rebecca Reinhardt of Delaware; 
Mary Ethelyn Tyler of Philadelphia. 

In the group of German and Modern History: 
Helen Catherine Schwarz of Connecticut 

(work for this degree completed in February) ; 
Marguerite Berta Else Krantz of New 

York, cum laude. 

In the group of Modern History and Eco- 
nomics and Politics: 

Mabel May Broomfield of Philadelphia; 
Dorothea Nesbitt Chambers of Turkey; 
Frances Chase Clarke of Rhode Island; 
Amy Whipple Collins of Virginia; 
Frances Blakiston Day of Philadelphia, 

magna cum laude; 
Catherine Arms Everett of Philadelphia; 
Dorothy Phillips Hall of Baltimore; 
Ruth Gertrude Hamilton of Pennsylvania; 
Gertrude James Hearne of Pennsylvania; 
Clara Elizabeth Hollis of Illinois; 



Helene Vennum Johnson of Wisconsin; 
Winifred Hope Kaufmann of Illinois; 
Elizabeth Day Lanier of Connecticut; 
Marie Agathe Lubar of Philadelphia; 
Angela Turner Moore of New York City; 
Helen Prescott of Massachusetts, cum laude; 
Marjorie Remington of New York City; 
Ruth Olive Richards of New Jersey (work for 

this degree completed in February) ; 
Alice Miriam Snavely of Philadelphia, cum 

laude; 

Louisa Beatrice Sorchan of New York City; 
Annette Stiles of Massachusetts; 
Helen Tappan of Baltimore; 
Catharine Cromble Taussig of Massachusetts; 
Louise Holaberd Wood of Illinois, magna 

cum laude. 

In the group of Modern History and History 
of Art: 
Georgia Reily Bailey of Pennsylvania, cum 

laude; 

Elizabeth Douglas Fuller of New York 

City; 
Marion Renwick Moseley of Illinois. 

In the group of Economics and Politics and 
Philosophy: 
Celia Oppenheimer of Washington, D. C, cum 

laude. 

In the group of Ecomonics and Politics and 
Philosophy and Psychology: 
Elizabeth R. Biddle of Pennsylvania, cum 

laude. 

In the group of Economics and Politics and 
Psychology: 

Elizabeth Bergner Hurlock of Pennsylvania; 
Enid Schurman Macdonald of British Colum- 
bia, cum laude; 
Emily Bishop Moores of Indiana; 
Ruth Jackson Woodruff of Pennsylvania, 

cum laude. 

In the group of Psychology and Biology: 
Marian Rose Bettman of Ohio; 
Margaret von Torney France of Baltimore; 
Dorothea Wetherill Walton of New York. 

In the group of Mathematics and Physics: 
Augusta Lyell Blue of Virginia; 
Emily Roxana Chadbourne of Massachusetts; 
Adelaide Landon of New York, cum laude; 
Edith Macrum of Pennsylvania, magna cum 

laude; 

Anna Thorndike of Massachusetts. 

In the group of Mathematics and Chemistry : 
Hazel Steel Collins of New York. 



1919] 



Award of Fellowships, Scholarships and Prizes 



71 



In the group of Chemistry and Geology: Julia Veronica Frazier of New York City, 

Dorothea Pauline Theresa Hering of New cum laude; 

Jersey. Jeannette Felicie Peabody of Massachusetts; 

In the group of Chemistry and Biology: Sarah Cole Taylor of North Carolina. 



award of fellowships, scholarships and 

PRIZES 



EUROPEAN FELLOWSHIPS AWARDED 

Mary E. Garrett European Fellowship of the 
value of $500. Mary Drusilla Flather of 
Lowell, Massachusetts. B.Ph., Brown University, 
1917. Laboratory Assistant, Brown Univer- 
sity, 1916-17; Graduate Student in Biology, 
Bryn Mawr College, 1917-18; Fellow in Biology, 
1918-19. 

President M. Carey Thomas European Fellow- 
ship of the value of $500. Margaret Bu- 
chanan of Morgantown, West Virginia. A.B., 
West Virginia University, 1906. Assistant and 
Instructor, West Virginia University, 1908-10; 
1910-11, 1915-18; Graduate Scholar in Math- 
ematics, Bryn Mawr College, 1912-13; Fellow 
in Mathematics, 1918-19. 

Bryn Mawr European Fellowship of the value 
of $500. Awarded to a member of the Senior 
Class. Ernestine Emma Mercer of Phila- 
delphia. Prepared by the Philadelphia High 
School for Girls. Group, Greek and Latin. 



Margaret Gilman of Boston, Massachusetts, 
prepared by the Misses Allen's School, West 
Newton, Mass., and Dana Hall, Wellesley, Mass. 
Group, French and Modern History. Grade 
85.757. 

Louise Holabird Wood of Winnetka, Illi- 
nois, prepared by the Girton School, Winnetka, 
111. Group, Modern History and Economics 
and Politics. Grade 85.652. 

FRENCH SCHOLARSHIPS 

Marthe Jeanne Trotain of Paris. Stu- 
dent in the Sorbonne, 1916-18; French Grad- 
uate Scholar, Bryn Mawr College, 1918-19. 

M. D. Visserias of Dijon. Licencie es Lettres, 
University of Dijon, 1918; Student University 
of Dijon, 1916-18. 

Suzanne Chambry, of Paris. Student in the 
Sorbonne, 1913-16. Assistant in the University 
of Birmingham, 1916-18; Licence en Langages. 



HONOUR STUDENTS OF THE CLASS OF 1919 

Frances Blakiston Day of Philadelphia, 
prepared by the Wissahickon Heights School, St. 
Martins, Philadelphia, and the Friends' School, 
Germantown, Pa. Group, Modern History and 
Economics and Politics. Grade 88.028. 

Ernestine Emma Mercer of Philadelphia, 
prepared by the Philadelphia High School for 
Girls. Group, Greek and Latin. Grade 87.427. 

Edith Macrum of Oakmont, Penna., prepared 
by the Baldwin School, Bryn Mawr, Penna. 
Group, Mathematics and Physics. Grade 
86.452. 

Eliza Gordon Woodbury of Manchester, 
New Hampshire, prepared by Bradford Acad- 
emy, Bradford, Mass. Group, Greek and 
English. Grade 86.119. 

Marguerite Olga Adler Schwartz of 
Philadelphia, prepared by Wadleigh High 
School, New York City and the Girls' High 
School, Philadelphia. Group, French and Ital- 
ian and Spanish. Grade 85.955. 



resident fellowships conferred 

Greek. Edith Marion Smith of Peoria, 
Illinois. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1918. 
Graduate Scholar in Greek, Bryn Mawr College, 
1918-19. 

Latin. Marjoree Josephine Milne of 
Duluth, Minnesota. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 

1917, and A.M., 1918. Graduate Scholar in 
Greek, Bryn Mawr College, 1917-18, and Fellow 
in Greek, 1918-19. 

English. Therese Mathilde Born of In- 
dianapolis, Indiana. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 

1918. Graduate Scholar in English, Bryn 
Mawr CoUege, 1918-19. 

Economics and Politics. Amy Lawrence 
Martin of Chicago, Illinois. A.B., Bryn Mawr 
College, 1915. Graduate Student, Columbia 
University, 1915-16, and A.M., Columbia 
University, 1916. Teacher of Economics and 
History in the Riverhook School, Nyack, N. Y., 
1916-19. 



72 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[July 



Carola Woerishojjer Department of Social 
Economy and Social Research. Gwendolyn 
Hughes of Norfolk, Nebraska. A.B., Uni- 
versity of Nebraska, 1916, and A.M., 1917. 
Scholar in Sociology, University of Nebraska, 
1916-17 and Fellow, 1917-18. Assistant in 
the Child Welfare Department, Lincoln Public 
Schools, 1917-18 Susan B. Anthony Scholar in 
Social Economy and Social Research, Bryn 
Mawr College, 1918-19. 

Ada Ruth Kuhn of Lincoln, Nebraska. 
A.B., University of Nebraska, 1915, and A.M., 
1918. Graduate Student in Sociology, Uni- 
versity of Nebraska, 1916-19. 

Philosophy. Margaret Georgiana Melvin 
of New Brunswick, Canada. A.B., Royal 
Victoria College, McGill University, 1917. 
Graduate Scholar in Philosophy, Bryn Mawr 
College, 1917-18 and Fellow in Philosophy, 
1918-19. 

Psychology. Margaret Montague Monroe 
of Asheville, North Carolina. A.B., Mount 
Holyoke College, 1915. Graduate Scholar in 
Psychology, Bryn Mawr College, 1916-17, 
and Fellow in Psychology, 1918-19. Teacher 
of French, Commercial High School, Atlanta, 
Ga., 1915-16; Teacher of Mathematics in 
Smead School, Toledo, Ohio, 1917-18. 

Mathematics. Bird Margaret Turner of 
Moundsville, West Virginia. A.B., University 
of West Virginia, 1915, and A.M., 1916. Stu- 
dent Assistant in Mathematics, University of 
West Virginia, 1913-15: Graduate Student, 
1914-15, and Assistant in the Summer School, 
1915-16. Graduate Scholar in Mathematics, 
Bryn Mawr College, 1916-17. Assistant Di- 
rector of the Phebe Anna Thorne Model School, 
Bryn Mawr College, 1917-18; President's 
European Fellow-elect, and Reader in Mathe- 
matics, 1918-19. 

Chemistry. Helen Frances Goldstein of 
New York City. B.S., Barnard College, 1918. 
Graduate Scholar in Chemistry, Bryn Mawr 
College, 1918-19. 

Geology. Margaret Cameron Cobb of Ports- 
mouth, Virginia. A.B., Barnard College, 1915. 
Graduate Student, Columbia University, 1915- 
16. Fellow in Geology, Bryn Mawr College, 
1916-17. Instructor in Geology, Mount Hol- 
yoke College, 1917-19. 

History. Nina Louise Early of Clarks- 
ville, Tennessee. B.S., Vanderbilt University, 
1914; and M.S., 1915. 



Education. Monica Flannery of Berkeley, 
California. A.B., University of California, 
1916; and A.M., 1918. 

Biology. Hope Hibbard of Columbia, Mis- 
souri. A.B., University of Missouri, 1916, and 
A.M., 1918. Assistant in Zoology, University of 
Missouri, 1915-18. Assistant Demonstrator 
and Honorary Scholar in Biology, Bryn Mawr 
College, 1918-19. 

GRADUATE SCHOLARSHIPS AWARDED 

Margaret Kingsland Haskell Scholarship in 
English Composition. Value $750. Catherine 
Needham of Urbana, Illinois. A.B., University 
of Illinois, 1918, and A.M., 1919. Graduate 
Student, University of Illinois, 1918-19. 

Susan B. Anthony Memorial Scholarship. 
Value $450. Josephine Lucille Zrust of 
Clarkson, Nebraska. A.B., University of 
Nebraska, 1919, and A.M., 1919. 

Robert G. Valentine Memorial Scholarship in 
Social Economy and Social Research. Value 
$200. Eleanor Copenhaver of Marion, Vir- 
ginia. A.B., Richmond College, 1917. 
Teacher of Science, the High School, Marion, 
1917-18. Graduate Scholar in Social Economy 
and Social Research, Bryn Mawr College, 
1918-19. 

Latin. Helen Frances Wood of South 
Hadley Falls, Massachusetts. A.B., Mount 
Holyoke College, 1918. Graduate Student, 
Mount Holyoke College, 1918-19. 

Ernestine Emma Mercer of Philadelphia. 
Of the class of 1919, Bryn Mawr College. 

French. Margaret Gilman of Wellesley, 
Massachusetts. Of the Class of 1919, Bryn 
Mawr College. 

Marguerite Olga Adler Schwartz of 
Philadelphia. Of the Class of 1919, Bryn 
Mawr College. 

Semitic Languages and Biblical Literature. 
Ruth Richards of Medford, Massachusetts. 
A.B., Mount Holyoke College, 1918. Graduate 
Student, Mount Holyoke College, 1918-19. 
Assistant in the Department of Biblical Litera- 
ture, Mount Holyoke College. 

Political Science. Frances Shipman Pen- 
rose of Walla Walla, Washington. Of the Class 
of 1919, Whitman College, Walla Walla, 
Washington. 

History. Jane Elizabeth Herrmann of 
Washington, D. C. A.B., George Washing- 
ton University, 1918. 



1919] 



Award of Fellowships, Scholarships and Prizes 



73 



Mary Deming Penrose of Walla Walla, 
Washington. A.B., Whitman College, 1918. 
Publicity and Employment Secretary, Y. W. 
C. A., 1918-19. 

Social Economy and Social Research: Jane 
Stodder D avies of Tufts College, Massachusetts. 
A.B., Jackson College, Tufts College, 1918. 
Robert G. Scholar in Social Economy, Bryn 
Mawr College, 1918-19. 

Education. Cecelia Irene Baechle of 
Philadelphia. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1913. 
Graduate Student, University of Pennsylvania, 
1913-14. Teacher of Latin and English in the 
High School, York, Penna., 1914-19. 

Philosophy. Margaret Collins Knapp of 
Marcellus, New York. Of the Class of 1919, 
Cornell University. 

Alice Harrison NEWLiNof Whitford, Penna. 
A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1918. 

Psychology. Ruth Jackson Woodruff of 
Pennsylvania. Of the Class of 1919, Bryn 
Mawr College. 

Mathematics. Margaret Buchanan of West 
Virginia. A.B., University of West Virginia, 
1906. Graduate Student, University of West 
Virginia, 1907. Assistant in Greek and Math- 
ematics, 1908-09, and Instructor in Math- 
ematics, 1910-12, 1915-19. Graduate Scholar 
in Mathematics, Bryn Mawr College, 1912-13; 
Fellow in Mathematics, 1918-19, and M. Carey 
Thomas European Fellow elect, 1919-20. 

Chemistry. Elizabeth Walker of Newton 
Highlands, Massachusetts. Class of 1919, 
Mount Holyoke College. 

Gwei Hsin Wang of China. Class of 1919, 
Western College, Oxford, Ohio. 

Geology. Isabel F. Smith of Los Angeles, 
California. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1915. 
Teacher in the Wheeler School, Providence, 
R. L, 1915-17. Scholar in Geology, Bryn 
Mawr College, 1917-18, and Fellow in Geology, 
1918-19. 

BRITISH SCHOLARSHIPS 

Muriel Barker of South Farnborough, 
Hampshire, England. Newnham College, Cam- 
bridge, Mathematical Tripos, Part I, 1913, Part 
II, 1955. B.Sc, with Honours, London Uni- 
versity, 1915, Mathematical Research Worker 
on Aircraft, Royal Aircraft Establishment, 
Farnborough, 1918-19. 

Gertrude Mayne Sinclair of Solihull, 
Warwickshire, England. Girton College, Cam- 
bridge. Classical Tripos, Part I, 1919. 



UNDERGRADUATE SCHOLARSHIPS 

Maria L. Eastman Brooke Hall Memorial 
Scholarship. Value $100. Awarded to the 
student in the Junior Class who in the middle 
of her Junior year has the highest average grade. 
Marie Litzinger of Bedford, Pennsylvania. 
Prepared by the High School, Bedford. James 
E. Rhoads Sophomore Scholar, 1917-18, First 
Charles S. Hinchman Memorial Scholar, 1918— 
19. Group, Latin and Mathematics. Grade 
88.240. 

Charles S. Hinchman Memorial Scholarship. 
Value $500. For special ability in one or both 
group subjects. Mary Anngenette Noble of 
Westfield, Massachusetts. Prepared by the High 
School, Westfield. Group, French and Spanish. 

Honourable Mention: Bower Kelly of 
Haverford, Pennsylvania. Prepared by the 
Faulkner School, Chicago, 111., and the Misses 
Kirk's School, Bryn Mawr Group, Mathematics 
and Physics. 

Elizabeth S. Shippen Foreign Scholarship. 
Value $200. Ernestine Emma Mercer of 
Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High 
School, Philadelphia. Bryn Mawr Matricula- 
tion Scholar for Pennsylvania and the Southern 
States, 1915-16, Trustees' Philadelphia Girls' 
High School Scholar, 1915-19, Elizabeth S. 
Shippen Scholar in Foreign Languages, 1918-19; 
Bryn Mawr European Fellow (elect), 1919-20. 
Group, Greek and Latin. 

Elizabeth S. Shippen Scholarship in Foreign 
Languages. Value $100. Margaret Milli- 
cent Carey of Baltimore. Prepared by the 
Bryn Mawr School, Baltimore. Pennsylvania 
and the Southern States Matriculation Scholar 
and Bryn Mawr School Scholar, 1916-17. 
Group, Greek and English. 

Elizabeth S. Shippen Scholarship in Science. 
Value $100. Miriam Burkloe Brown of 
Baltimore. Mary Anna Longstreth Memorial 
Scholar, 1916-17, and Special Scholar, 1917-18. 
Group, Psychology and Biology. 

James E. Rhoads Junior Scholarship. 
Value $250. Beatrice Norah Spinelli of 
Philadelphia. Prepared by the Girls' High 
School, West Philadelphia. Philadelphia Girls' 
High School Trustees' Scholar, 1917-18, and 
James E. Rhoads Sophomore Scholar, 1918-19. 
Group, Greek and English. 

James E. Rhoads Sophomore Scholarship. 
Value $250. Lillian Wyckoff of Norwich, 
Connecticut. Prepared by the Norwich Free 
Academy. Bryn Mawr Matriculation Scholar 



74 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[July 



for the New England States, 1917-18, and 
Frances Marion Simpson Scholar, 1917-19. 

Mary E. Stevens Junior Scholarship. Value 
$160. Louise Fontaine Cadot of Richmond, 
Virginia. Prepared by the Virginia Randolph 
Ellett School, Richmond, Va. Richmond Spe- 
cial Scholar, 1918-19. Group, Economics and 
Politics and Psychology. 

Anna Hallowell Junior Scholarship. Value 
$100. Mary Helen Macdonald of Ardmore, 
Pennsylvania. Prepared by the Lower Merion 
High School, Ardmore, Pa. Lower Merion 
High School Scholar, 1917-18; James E. Rhoads 
Sophomore Scholar, 1918-19. 

Mary Anna Longs treth Senior Scholarship. 
Value $200. Hilda Buttenwieser of Cin- 
cinnati, Ohio. Prepaid by the University School, 
Cincinnati. Special Scholar, 1918-19. Group, 
Greek and Latin. 

Thomas H. Powers Senior Scholarship. Value 
$200. Frances Louise von Hofsten of 
Winnetka, Illinois. Prepared by the Girton 
School, Winnetka. Special Scholar, 1918-19. 
Group, Latin and English. 

Anna M. Powers Senior Scholarship. Marie 
LnziNGER of Bedford. Pennsylvania. Prepared 
Iby the High School, Bedford. James E. Rhoads 
Sophomore Scholar, 1917-18; First Charles S. 
Hichman Memorial Scholar, 1918-19; Maria 
L. Eastman Brooke Hall Scholar (elect), 1919-20 
Group, Latin and Mathematics. 

Mary Katharine Cary, of Richmond, Vir- 
ginia. Prepared by the Virginia Randolph Ellett 
School, Richmond. Special Scholar, 1918-19. 
Group, Chemistry and Biology. 

Minnie Murdoch Kendrick Memorial Junior 
Scholarship. Value $200. Ruth Louise Karns 
of Benton, Pennsylvania. Prepared by the 
Wilkes-Barre Institute, Wilkes-Barre, Pennsyl- 
vania. 

Constance Lewis Memorial Junior Scholar- 
ship from the Class of 1904. Value $100. 
Elizabeth Barnett Cecil of Richmond, 
Virginia. Prepared by the Virginia Randolph 
Ellett School, Richmond, Va. 

Special Junior Scholarships: Value $100 
each. Irene Emma Maginniss of Llanerch, 
Pennsylvania, Prepared by the High School, 
Upper Darby, Pennsylvania. 

Agnes Hollingsworth of Ardmore, Penn- 
sylvania. Prepared by the Lower Merion 
High School, Ardmore. Special Scholar, 1918- 
19.. 

Ida Felicia Lauer of Philadelphia. Pre- 
pared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. 



Special Junior Scholarship. Value $100. 
Sidney Virginia Donaldson of Ardmore, Penn- 
sylvania. Prepared by the Lower Merion High 
School, Ardmore. Lower Merion High School 
Scholar, 1917-18; Special Scholar, 1918-19. 
Group, French. 

Special Junior Scholarship. Value $25. 
Cecile Baldwin Bolton of Charlottesville, 
Virginia. Prepared by St. Anne's School, 
Charlottesville. Group, English. 

Special Junior Scholarship. Value $200. 
Passya Eunia Ostroff of Philadelphia. 
Prepared by William Penn High School and by 
the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. L. C. B. 
Saul Memorial Scholar, 1917-19. Thomas H. 
Powers Memorial Scholar, 1918-19. Group, 
Economics and Politics and Philosophy and 
Psychology. 

Maria Hopper Sophomore Scholarship. Value 
$200. Henrietta Cooper Jennings of Dan- 
ville, Pennsylvania. Prepared by the High 
School, Williamsport, Pennsylvania, and by 
the Misses Kirk's School, Bryn Mawr, Penn- 
sylvania. 

Maria Hopper Sophomore Scholarship. Value 
$100. Sadle Muriel Baron of Bryn Mawr, 
Pennsylvania. Prepared by the Lower Merion 
High School, Ardmore, Pennsylvania. 

Charles E. Ellis Scholarships. Value $200. 
Malvina Dorothy Glasner of Philadelphia. 
Prepared by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia, 

Frances Label of Philadelphia. Prepared, 
by the Girls' High School, Philadelphia. Charles 
E. Ellis Scholar, 1918-19. 

Emily Dorothy Stevenson of Philadelphia. 
Prepared by the Girl's High School, Philadelphia. 

prizes 

George W. Childs Essay Prize for Best Writer 
in the Senior Class. A watch. Eliza Gordon 
Woodbury of Manchester, New Hampshire. 
Prepared by Bradford Academy, Bradford, 
Massachusetts. Group, Greek and English. 

Mary Helen Ritchie Memoral Prize. A set 
of Shakespeare's Works. Annette Stiles of 
Fitchburg, Massachusetts. Prepared by the 
Public Schools, Fitchburg, and by Wykeham 
Rise, Washington, Connecticut. Group, Span- 
ish and History. 

Prize for Best Essay on China's Interest in the 
League of Nations." Jean Atherton Flexner 
of New York City. Prepared by the Brearley 
School, New York City. Group, History and 
Economics and Politics. 



1919 



Class Reunions 



75 



Honourable Mention. Louise Fontaine Cabot 
of Richmond, Virginia. Prepared by the 
Virginia Randolph Ellett School, Richmond, 
Virginia. 

Horace White Greek Literature Prize for the 
the Best Student in Greek Literature. Katharine 
Louise Ward of Washington, D. C. Prepared 
by Miss Madeira's School, Washington, D. C. 
Group, Greek and English. 

Prizes for general information. Frances 
Blakiston Day of Philadelphia (Class of 
1919) 1st Prize $100. Prepared by the Wis- 
sahickon Heights School, Philadelphia and by 
the Friends' School, Germantown, Philadelphia. 

Margaret Gilman of Wellesley, Massachu- 
setts (Class of 1919) 2nd Prize $50. Prepared 
by the Misses Allen's School, West Newton, 
Massachusetts. 

Eliza Gordon Woodbury of Manchester, 
N. H. (Class of 1919) , 3rd Prize $25. Prepared 
by the Bradford Academy, Bradford, Mass. 

Honourable Mention: Jean Atherton 
Flexner (Class of 1921); Margaret Whitall 



Rhoads (Class of 1919); Frederica Burckle 
Howell (Class of 1919); Mary Safford 
Munford (Class of 1919); Marguerite Olga 
Adler Schwartz (Class of 1919); Marjorie 
Martin (Class of 1919); Frances Chase 
Clarke (Class of 1919). 

Prizes for General Literature: Doris Ellen 
Pitkin of New York City (Class of 1920) 1st 
Prize $100. Prepared by the Misses Rayson's 
School, New York City and the Brearley School, 
New York City. 

Margaret Miller Dent of Philadelphia 
(Class of 1920) 2nd Prize $50. Prepared by the 
Ethel Walker School, Simsbury, Conn. 

Katharine Louise Ward of Washington, 
D. C. (Class of 1921) 3rd Prize $25. Prepared 
by Miss Madeira's School, Washington, D. C. 

Honourable mention: Helen Fleld Cono- 
ver (Class of 1919); Anna Rubenia Dubach 
(Class of 1919); Margaret Gilman (Class of 
1919); Mary Safford Munford (Class of 
1919); Eliza Gordon Woodbury (Class of 
1919). 



TWELVE CLASSES HOLD REUNIONS AND 
BREAK MANY RECORDS 



More than 400 alumnae thronged back to 
Bryn Mawr for reunions this June. War 
workers from Europe were among them and 
many war workers at home took long delayed 
vacations, rather tired school teachers and ex- 
amination wearied law and medicine students 
and busy women of affairs as well as runaway 
mothers and housekeepers were among them. 

The halls were taxed for accommodations. 
Window seats did night as well as day duty, 
wardens were distracted but the campus was 
gay as it has not been since 1914. 

There were 12 classes back formally and in- 
formally, banqueting in style, supping in luxury 
and picnicking in comfort. For the first time in 
the history of the college there was a thirtieth 
reunion. 1889, the first class to be graduated 
was back 15 strong out of a possible 24. 

1889 

All the alumnae of Bryn Mawr seemed this 
June to be indulging in a post-war blossoming. 
It was evidently a fat year after lean ones. '89 
was present, 13 strong out of her 25, but this 
ominous number was rendered innocuous by 
the presence of three very lovely daughters. 



Myself, after an absence of thirty years found a 
reunion warming to the cockles of the heart — 
those cardiac appendages that are more sensi- 
tive than all the auricles and ventricles com- 
bined. One or two absent members put out 
the tentacles of newsy letters. We did not 
set the campus afire; did not even paint it red; 
and were too timid to raise the tune of Munns 
Brynmawrensium, upon which we were brought 
up. We only smiled happily upon each other 
and complacently upon other lunching classes, 
assured in our minds that "old age hath yet 
his honor and his toil." Nor was our compla- 
cency lessened when President Thomas, re- 
ceiving us at the Deanery, assured us that she 
felt nearer to us than to any other class "for we 
entered the college together." 

Helen Coale Crew, '89. 

1893 

This anniversary of the class of '93 observed 
one year later because of the war, was cele- 
brated in Bryn Mawr on June 3, 4, and 5 by 15 
members of the class. 

Susan Walker FitzGerald dropped the hoe 
on her farm near Boston and presided; Louise 



76 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[July 



Brownell Saunders came in spite of the many 
duties and labors connected with closing her 
school, "Hill Crest," in Clinton, New York, 
bringing her daughter Olivia, a sub-freshman; 
Jane Brownell made the journey from Provi- 
dence, Lillian Moser from Syracuse, and Emma 
Atkins Davis hastened home from a visit in 
Indianapolis in order to be present. Elizabeth 
Nichols Moores also came from Indianapolis, 
both to be with her daughter, Emily Bishop 
Moores, at her graduation and to take part in 
the reunion; and Helen Thomas Flexner came 
from New York with her young son, James 
Flexner, aged eight. All those living in or near 
Bryn Mawr were there:— Lucy Donnelly, 
Lucy Lewis, Mary Atkinson Watson, with her 
daughter Emily, a Swarthmore Senior, Louise 
Fulton Gucker, Josephine Jackson Ballagh, 
Harriet Seal, and S. Frances Van Kirk. 

On the afternoon of June 3, '94 gave an "in- 
formal tea drinking" for '93 and '95. It was 
to have been held on the campus, but rain sent 
the tea drinkers under the roof of Denbigh 
where they had a delightful time and saw more 
of one another than they would have seen out- 
of-doors. At this tea the idea flashed from 
the brain of Mary Breed that there should be 
held shortly a reunion, of all the Nineteenth 
Century classes of Bryn Mawr, and a committee 
of three was appointed — Mary Breed, '94, 
Susan FitzGerald, '93, and Elizabeth Conway 
Clark, '95, — to make necessary arrangements; 
the time agreed upon was three years from the 
present year. 

At the Alumnae Supper Louise Saunders, 
speaking for '93 expressed admiration for the 
devotion of Bryn Mawr to the "idea," under 
the inspiration of Miss Thomas as Dean and 
President, despite the beating waves of material 
interests, and she voiced the gratitude of the 
class to the College, and pledged again their 
loyalty. 

On the next afternoon Lucy Donnelly, with 
Helen Flexner, gave a tea for '93 and '94 in 
her apartment in Low Buildings. This was 
another very happy hour, spent in much talking 
and laughter. James Flexner took photo- 
graphs and so perpetuated the pleasant meet- 
ing for the eye. 

CLASS DINNER ON TERRACE 

The class dinner took place towards evening 
on the terrace of the College Inn. Miss Isabel 
Maddison was a guest of the class, and a small 



table held five other guests, junior '93 's — Olivia 
Saunders, Emily Watson, Emily Moores and 
Marjorie Mackenzie (Mary Taylor Mackenzie's 
daughter), both Bryn Mawr Seniors, and 
Carolyn Gucker, a pupil in the Phoebe Thome 
Model School. Emma Davis and Susan Fitz- 
Gerald were joint toast-mistresses, but they had 
little to do because it had been decided that 
there should be no burdensome responsibilities 
for anyone. 

The programs at each place were left blank, 
"to be rilled in," as Susan said, "according 
to everyone's desire." The first subject dis- 
cussed was the class themselves, unanimously 
declared to be handsomer, more adaptable, 
and younger than ever before. Almost all 
the absent sent greetings, with a report of their 
doings. 

NEWS FROM THE ABSENT 

There was a cablegram from Bertha Putnam 
and Ruth Emerson Fletcher's daughter now in 
London, and a telegram from Margaret Hillis 
Johnson who, by the way, is engaged in college 
settlement work. Eliza Lewis telegraphed 
that she had collected $306 for the class gift 
for the Victory Chair of French. At this point 
a generous member of the class gave a $100 
bond. As by these additions over a thousand 
dollars had now been given and promised, the 
president made a pledge of $1200 in all, the 
remainder to be raised by October. 

Eliza Lewis also wrote of seeing Ume Tsuda 
and Vicountess Unchida (Masa Doura) when 
in Japan, and of visiting the former's school. 
She was charmed by the life of our eastern allies, 
and much interested in the work being done by 
the women of Japan — a new departure in that 
country. Nothing but English is taught in 
Miss Tsuda's school, Lucy Donnelly reminded 
us, the theory being that its complete mastery 
opens the door to most other knowledge. The 
school is in great need of money, which may be 
sent in care of Mrs. Frank N. Lewis. 3216 North 
Pennsylvania Street, Indianapolis, Indiana. 
Henrietta Palmer, "Vulcan" of affectionate 
remembrance, sent a toast and promised to 
think of '93 while planting corn on her Sabine 
farm in Chepachet, Rhode Island. The book 
she translated from the French, "Letters from 
a French Soldier," has come from England and 
is being sent out. Should any subscriber fail 
to receive a copy, she should notify Henrietta 
Palmer, 153 Power Street, Providence, R. I. 



1919] 



Class Reunions 



77 



Evangeline Walker Andrews was sorry not to 
be able to come, but was busy with prepara- 
tions for a pageant and for the commencement 
at the Ethel Walker School, in Simsbury, Con- 
necticut. 

Mary Hoyt wrote that the closing days at the 
Bryn Mawr school in Baltimore claimed her; 
that a Master's degree in Philosophy, gained by 
summer woik, had been conferred upon her by 
Columbia; that she had enjoyed a course in 
History last winter at Johns Hopkins Univer- 
sity under Professor Latane; and that next year 
she is to be associate mistress and teacher of 
English at Oldfields, in Glencoe, near Baltimore. 

Amy Rock Ransome's letter proved that she 
has a genius for chairmanship: she is Honorary 
Chairman of the Woman's Land Army, Chair- 
man of Food Production and Home Economics, 
(both for the district of Columbia), and Presi- 
dent for the second time of the Bryn Mawr 
Club of Washington, having been its first presi- 
dent twenty years ago. Her war garden, planted 
on a still larger scale this year, has won the ap- 
preciative notice of her neighbor, the French 
Ambassador. 

Rachel Oliver sent a friendly message from 
the Library in Tryon, North Carolina where 
she is permanently occupied. 

Frances Atkins Kackley, who until the last 
few days expected to come, wrote that when- 
ever she planned a project something prevented 
its realization. The class sent word to her not 
to plan for the next reunion so that they might 
surely have her with them. 

Gertrude Taylor Slaughter is still in Italy 
and could not be notified of the reunion in time 
to send a message to Bryn Mawr. A. Martha 
Walker ("Miss Walker, A.M." of Dr. Shorey's 
class) wrote from Ocean Park, California that 
she is teaching, spending her vacations in Cali- 
fornia, Montana, or Colorado, among the moun- 
tains she loves. In two years she expects to 
start out upon extended travels. 

Mary Belle McMullin, who has had a long 
and painful illness and is far from well, sent a 
greeting. 

Elizabeth Hopkins sent love to every one 
and promised to come next time. Will that 
be to the Nineteenth Century Reunion? Her 
war service was different from that of all other 
members of the class: she taught the exact kind 
of French they needed to doctors, nurses, 
machine-gun men, high flyers — and plain in- 
fantry men, working so hard that influenza got 
hold of her and gave her "a hard blow in the 



chest." She is one of those who care a great 
deal about the Victory Chair of French. 

Mary Howard Shoup, now living in Dallas, 
Texas, sent word that the most interesting 
news about herself was that her oldest son, 
Francis Shoup, Jr., had won by competitive 
examination, with a general grade of 95 a 
principal's appointment to Annapolis, had 
passed the entrance examination with honor, 
and was awaiting orders. She is Treasurer of 
the College Club of Dallas, which is doing the 
good work of getting school-girls there inter- 
ested in going to college, and of providing one 
scholarship a year. 

Grace Parrish Emerson sent her good wishes 
and photographs of her four charming children. 

Helen Hopkins Thorn was obliged to remain 
in Annapolis to chaperone her daughter at the 
gayeties there; a place was left for her at the 
table, in the hope that she could find a sub- 
stitute, but even at the "eleventh hour" it was 
unoccupied. 

Nellie Neilson was kept away both by her 
work at Mount Holyoke College and by a 
journey to Montreal to meet her sister, Grace 
'06, who is returning from England. 

In the interstices of talk, several brief 
speeches were made: — 

Louise Saunders spoke of what the years at 
Bryn Mawr mean to an Alumna: besides pre- 
paring her for a profession and so giving the 
peace of mind that accompanies independence, 
they teach her to work in a group, as the war 
proved she could work, they give her a standard 
of measurement and, more than all, put within 
her grasp the intellectual life that makes for 
leadership. Considered with their imperish- 
able friendships the college days are the happi- 
est possession of her past, something that time 
cannot take from her. 

Josephine Ballagh looked forward from the 
present moment, touching upon what college 
women had learned about themselves during 
the war. Another door had been opened before 
them, she said; they had discovered with a 
thrill of joy a new strength of body and of mind, 
with a new ability to organize and direct. She 
urged that these powers be maintained and 
used in the future to their fullest extent. 

Lucy Lewis gave her impression of the chil- 
dren of '93, an impression necessarily limited, 
since she knew but a few of them. She pointed 
out the seeming contradiction that a mother 
most interested in science should have a daughter 
with the gifts of an artist, and that a daughter 



78 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[July 



of a mother with a love of the classics should 
intend to study medicine. These younger 
faces bring back strangely the mother almost 
as she was twenty-five years ago; and far 
from making '93 feel older, they give them a 
feeling of youth by bridging over the inter- 
vening years. 

Emma Davis also spoke upon children but 
upon the limitless group of children that have not 
received their rightful inheritance of air, food, 
healthful surroundings, and leisure for educa- 
tion. The work for Child Welfare, she told 
us, if accomplished in its fullest extent, will end 
most of the problems furnished by disease, 
unrest, and crime. All the listeners carried 
away from her talk a new sense of their respon- 
sibility in this movement [to save the lives of 
children and to make them normally comforta- 
ble and happy]. 

Lucy Donnelly told of the "New Bryn 
Mawr," the Bryn Mawr of to-day — and there 
it is always to-day — "perennially youthful, 
perennially hopeful, perennially delightful." 
While saying good-bye with sincerest regret 
to the Senior classes, the college welcomes 
each Freshman class as the best that has ever 
come to Bryn Mawr; the "academic heart" is, 
she admitted, the most faithful and the most 
faithless! A higher standard now reigns: the 
happy days of '93 are gone when a student 
finished a required essay the day before com- 
mencement or remained away from a class 
picnic in order to pass off an omitted Greek 
paper. Rules are unyielding; merits are not 
pleasant additions to the courses but necessities 
for a degree. The returning classes, she ended, 
are to Bryn Mawr a remembered dream, a dim 
past mingling in a vivid reality; the present 
Bryn Mawr is the "real Bryn Mawr." 

Last, a letter was read from Miss Thomas, 
who was prevented by the pressure of her work 
from addressing the class. Her thought of 
them at this time and her gracious message will 
always be an inspiring and treasured memory. 
She wrote, in part: 
11 Dear Class of 'PJ, 

I am very sorry not to have the pleasure of 
meeting you but I know of no class that is 
better able to think out for itself arguments in 
favor of an academic education. So many of 
you are shining illustrations of precisely this 
kind of education! 

With admiration and affection, 
Very sincerely yours, 

M. Carey Thomas," 

The Class of 1893. 



The next day those who could, attended the 
Commencement exercises, and then, taking 
with them the remembrance of what to them is 
a fair dream, they returned to their own various 
worlds where professors, teachers, chairmen, 
mothers and housekeepers, and farmers, are 
quite other than dream figures. 

1894 

The Class of 1894 celebrated their twenty- 
fifth anniversary on Tuesday June 3 at the Col- 
lege Tea Room. The following members were 
present: Laurette Potts Pease, Mary Breed, 
Katherine Porter, Fay MacCracken Stockwell, 
Elizabeth Mifilin Boyd, Anna West Urst, Emi- 
lie Martin, Emma Bailey Speer, Abby Brayton 
Durfee. 

Interesting letters and telegrams of regrets 
were read from Mabel Birdsall Cowles, Sarah 
Darlington Hamilton, Blanche Follansbee Cald- 
well, Margaret Shearman, Elsie Coates Nelson, 
Mary MacMillan, Marie Minor, Marion Tay- 
lor Woods, Martha La Porte and Anna Yardley 
Prettyman. 

In the afternoon '94 was hostess at a tea given 
to '93 and '95. At the alumnae dinner in the 
evening, '94 was privileged to sit at the head 
table and Mary Breed did the class proud with 
one of the best toasts of the evening. It was a 
very happy day with only one regret, that more 
of the class could not have been present. 

1899 

The Class of '99 held its twentieth reunion 
at Bryn Mawr on June 2. Headquarters were 
established in Pembroke West and were em- 
bellished with photographs of the husbands and 
children, to say nothing of the dogs of class 
members. On the campus side of Pembroke 
three flags met the eyes of all passers; first the 
'99 banner, with the white numerals on the 
green ground; then the class's coat of arms, 
the donkey's head, rampant, (as always) sur- 
mounting the thistle, '99's class flower; and 
third, the service flag, with green stars for mem- 
bers, and blue stars for husbands. 

The reunion costume consisted of a white 
shirtwaist and skirt adorned with a green 
voile scarf, and topped by a broad brimmed 
ecru straw hat, brimmed with a green voile 
streamer. A green badge bearing the legend 
"Twenty years after," and the bearer's name, 
adorned each member, augmented in many 
cases by a small edition of Old Glory, to denote 
actual or vicarious war service. No surprise 



1919] 



Class Reunions 



79 



was experienced when this magnificent costume 
won the prize in the Alumnae Parade. 

Twenty-three sat down to the class supper 
in Merion; they were: 

Mary Hoyt, Bess Bissell, Ellen Kilpatrick, 
Content Nichols, Anne Boyer, Elsie Andrews, 
Madeline Palmer Bakewell, Mary Towle, 
Katharine Houghton Hepburn, Etta Davis, 
May Blakey Ross, Katherine Middendorf 
Blackwell, Charlotte Hubbard Goodell, Alice 
Carter Dickerman, Edith Chapin Craven, 
Sibyl Hubbard Darlington, Caroline Brown 
Lewis, May Schoneman Sax, Dorothy Fron- 
heiser Meredith, Ethel Levering Motley, Evetta 
Jeffers Shock, Margaret Stirling Thom, Eleanor 
Tyler, Laura Peckham Waring, and Emma 
Guffey Miller. Mary Thurber Dennison was 
expected but at the last minute was detained by 
illness, as was Mary Foulke Morrisson. 

The following wrote or telegraphed their 
regrets; Martha Irwin, Margaret Gage, Sylvia 
Scudder Bowditch, Ethel Hooper Edwards, 
Cora Hardy Jarrett, Lillian Powell Fordyce, 
and Jane Clarke Fouilhoux. Previous to this 
the secretary had heard from almost everyone 
in the class so that the interest in the reunion 
was general. 

Mary Thurber Dennison has returned from 
England where her husband went on govern- 
ment business last March. 

Helen Thurber Dennison, '99's class baby is 
taking her entrance examination for Bryn Mawr. 

The following '99 husbands saw service 
abroad: Capt. T. E. Pooley with the English 
artillery, Capt. Roger Whitman with the Rain- 
bow Division, Capt. Andre Fouilhoux with the 
Artillery, Lieut. Radnor Lewis with the Army 
of Occupation, Sergt. Phillip Meredith with 
Pershing's Iron Division, and Maj. Charles M. 
Bakewell who is writing a history of the Ameri- 
can Red Cross in Italy. 

The Class learned with deep regret of the 
death of Christine Orrick Fordyce, who died 
in April after a long illness. Beside her hus- 
band William C. Fordyce of St. Louis she 
leaves three sons and one daughter. This is 
the first death of those who entered together 
and took their degrees in June 1899. 

May Schoneman Sax's eldest son, Percival, 
Jr., entered Troy Tech last fall. 

Lillian Powell Fordyce's eldest son, Samuel, is 
a junior in Harvard. 



Mary Foulke Morrisson's eldest son, Robert, 
enters college next fall. 

The members of '99 who saw service ' over 
seas are Ellen Kilpatrick, Mary Hoyt, Mar- 
garet Hall, Gertrude Ely, Elizabeth Bissell, 
Amy Steiner, and Marion Ream Stevens. Of 
these Ellen Kilpatrick, Mary Hoyt, and Bess 
Bissell are back in this country. The others 
are still on duty abroad. 

'99 Class Report 1914-1919 

Andrews, Elizabeth A., Merion, Pa.: 

I have been thunderingly busy during the 
last five years just as every one else has, and I 
quail before putting it on paper, but you can 
have it if you want it. The most interesting 
and strenuous business was the re-organization 
of a school in San Antonio, Texas, where I had 
about 10 years crammed into one. While 
there I saw Dr. Kaeasbey several times. I 
also saw something of Margie de Armand '98 
and Eleanor Bliss, '04. That was during the 
first year of the war. Last year I graduated from 
the Pierce School in shorthand and typewriting 
and in between all sorts of things." 

Allen, Helen H., 35 Grove Street, New Bed- 
ford, Mass.: 

" I am sorry I shan't be at reunion. I have 
been a grand subject for orthopedic operations 
for the last three years and it is rather hard 
still for me to wander far from home. I'd like 
to hear any class gossip." 



Bettle, Edith, Haverford, Pa. : 

Assistant Librarian, Haverford 
1914-1919. 



College, 



Bissell, Besste Gertrude, 400 West 3rd 

Street, Dubuque, Iowa: 

Red Cross Canteen Worker in France and 
Italy, 1918-1919. 

Blakey, May Louise (Mrs. Thomas Ross), 
Doylestown, Pa.: 
Three sons. 

Boyer, Ann Ayer, 219 Mahantongo Street, 

Pottsville, Pa.: 

"This year I am teaching my majors for the 
first time in 12 years. I assure you chemistry 
and biology are a welcome change from French 
and German. As to the rest, it is simply the 
usual line of small town activities." 



80 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[July 



Brown, Carolyn T. (Mrs. Herbert Radnor- 
Lewis ), 646 Madison Avenue, N. Y.: 
"Unfortunately there are no warm, cuddlely, 
bear-hug babies in the last five years of my 
life — just brain creatures that sometimes are 
fairly successful, but not very satisfactory in 
the long run. And even they have changed 
their character. Five years ago they took on 
the forms of Harper's Bazar and Good House- 
keeping; today they have an unmistakable 
silky texture. 

It was just shortly after out last reunion that 
I realized that I had gone about as far as I 
could in the editorial line, that there were no 
more trenches to take, that I could either set- 
tle down to the monotony of a quiet sector or 
get out and make a drive against the line of 
competition again. As action is always more 
alluring to me, I got out. 

My first drive didn't take me far out of the 
editorial trenches for the lure in the form of 
"y° u will be the first woman to be the editor 
of a retogravure section" lead me to the New 
York Tribune, but the war exploded the ideas 
we had for the development of the Tribune 
Graphic Section. And I then determined really 
to buck the line and take up the work I have 
always wanted to do — advertising. 

I thought I would have to begin at the bottom 
of the ladder again, but I really eased in by 
way of editorial publicity, for I went directly to 
the leading silk house in America — H. R. Mallin- 
son & Company Inc. — you all know the makers 
of the world-famous Pussy Willow (I can't 
help but write advertising now) — and attempted 
to show them why they needed me — and they 
believed me. The work at first was along the 
line of editorial publicity, that is articles, 
etc., featuring Mallinson Silks, but today 
it embraces everything that comes up in the 
office of a big national advertiser — advertis- 
ing copy, art work, merchandise service, dis- 
play propositions, publicity schemes of all kinds 
— the scope is really limitless. 

And I am really with a nice 48 hour job for 
creative work is never gauged by time and 
never done. But there's always something new 
and something different. And even the editor- 
ial work is still with me, only instead of two or 
three articles a month as I wrote in the old 
days of my editorship on the Bazar and Good 
Housekeeping I now write from 15 to 20 a month 
and they include articles on every imaginable 
subject, now a speech that a member of the 
firm is going to make at a banquet, again a 



technical story on silk weaving, still again the 
flossiest and snappiest of fashion stories, and 
again an interview with a celebrity who dotes 
on Mallinson Silks, even articles on subjects 
that are entirely foreign to silk because the 
magazine wants some representation from our 
office. 

It has kept me from a lot of war work I should 
have liked to have undertaken, but I felt that 
I made my big sacrifice when I gave up my 
husband to the service, for it has left me en- 
tirely alone since the beginning of the war. 
This doesn't mean that I haven't been con- 
nected with quite a few societies that were 
interested in the war work, but it has not been 
war work in the big, constructive way that I 
should have liked to have thrown myself body 
and spirit. 

I have run over space limits and proved 
beyond a doubt that I am an advertising woman, 
but please forgive me." 

Brown, Margaret Wyckliffe, Louisville, £y. 

Browne, Mary Nicholson, M.D., 510 Park 

Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

Teacher, Catonsville School, Catonsville, Md., 
1911-1919 

Carter, Alice (Mrs. Wm. Carter Dickerman) 
Mamaroneck, N. Y.: 
Two sons, three daughters. 

Chapin, Edith (Mrs. Thomas T. T. Craven), 

225 Lenoir Avenue, Wayne, Pa. : 

"I have given the last four years to a very 
absorbing and interesting experiment. That 
of earning my living. I spent 1915-17 at Bryn 
Mawr in what seemed to me the dizzy eminence 
of an English readership, incidentally discover- 
ing that our ancient scepticism as to the posi- 
tion of a degree was totally unfounded. In 
1917-18 I taught English at the Ethel Walker 
School and am now teaching English and 
Psychology at Ogontz where I shall remain 
another year." 

Chase, Bertha P. (Mrs John Hudson Hollis), 

150 Ocean Street, Lynn, Mass.: 

"I am just finishing work on this Victory 
Loan. I was chairman of the Woman's Com- 
mittee of Lynn and have had 350 women in 
my organized committee, so I am just begin- 
ning to draw a long breath after weeks of strenu- 
ous planning." 



1919] 



Class Reunions 



81 



On December 5, 1916. Madeline Burrell 
Hollis was born. 

My war activities have been as follows: 

Graduate of Course in Surgical Dressings. 

Graduate of Course in Refugee Garments. 

Head Monitor at Lynn Red Cross Work 
Room. 

Head Monitor of evening group at my home. 

Chairman of Bureau of Education, Chair- 
man of Committee on Elementary Hygiene and 
Home Care of the Sick, Member of Executive 
Committee, Lynn Chap. American Red Cross. 

Chairman of Booths — Red Cross Member- 
ship Drive, 1917. 

Chairman House to House City canvass — Red 
Cross Membership Drive, 1918. 

Chairman Ward & W. S. Stamp Drive 1918. 

Chairman Woman's Committee of 500, 
Fourth Liberty Loan. 

Chairman Woman's Committee of Fifth Lib- 
erty Loan. 

I have also done some speaking, as follows: 

Shepard School Parent Teacher Assoc. — "Co- 
operation of Home and School." 

Baltimore Service School Parent Teacher 
Asso. " Co-operation of Home and School." 

Baltimore Service School Parent Teacher 
Asso. "American Red Cross Work for Refu- 
gees." 

Cliftondale Mothers' Meeting- — "Problems of 
Child Training." 

Camp Fire Girls — "Vacation Work for Ameri- 
can Red Cross." 

Victory Meeting For Women — Lynn Auditor- 
ium — "Woman's Part in Reconstruction." 

Clark, Jean Butler (Mrs. J. Andre Fouil- 
houx), The Arundel, Baltimore, Md. 
Husband in service, Captain. 

Churchill, Mary Gardner, Kenilworth, 111. 

Curtis, Marion (Mrs. Roger B. Whitman) 
331 West 76th Street, New York City: 
'I have been doing war work for the Cana- 
dian Government and also for the U. S. A." 

Davis, Etta Lincoln, Waverly, Mass. : 

"The thing most interesting, to myself at 
least, that I have been doing the last five years, 
was begun in the fall of 1917 when I started to 
develop an ancestral woodlot of 100 acres 
more or less by cutting off and selling part of 
the wood. This and my service at the Wellesley 
College Training Camp for the Woman's Land 



Army of America was my nearest approach to 
war relief work. I also have become greatly 
interested in equal suffrage." 

de Schweinitz, Agnes (Mrs E. R. Zallinski), 
561 East First South Street, Salt Lake City, 
Utah. 

Ely, Gertrude S., Bryn Mawr, Pa.: 

"Gertrude Ely is in Coblenz, Germany, and 
will be until the autumn, so cannot be included 
in the reunion and endowment fund plan of 
her class." 

Erismann, Pauline A. C, Genieve, Switzer- 
land. 

Foulke, Mary T. R. (Mrs. James William 
Morrisson), 719 Rush Street, Chicago, 111.: 
"President, Chicago Suffrage Association 
since 1915. Recording Secretary of the Na- 
tional 1915-1916. Ran and financed suffrage 
parade at Republican National Convention. 
Marched in a cloudburst and filled the colosseum 
with dripping but undaunted women just as the 
antis finished an impassioned appeal to the com- 
mittee not to give women suffrage, they didn't 
want it! Suffrage speaking — all over the place. 
Helped organize woman's committee, Council 
of National Defense, Illinois, on its executive 
committee, one of their speakers. In all the 
loan campaigns, hard speaking mostly. Had 
a baby, James, Jr., April, 1917. War garden, 
two years. Canned (the stuff kept, most of 
it). Flu nearly polished me off this winter, 
so resigned all my jobs except that of running the 
town and the Victory loan. Raised $13,CKX> 
for the suffrage hospital in France. Five kids,, 
ages 18, 12, 10, 6, 2. Only one girl, the middle 
one. My eldest goes to college this fall." 

Fronheiser, Mary D. (Mrs. Philip T. Mere- 
dith), Harrisburg, Pa.: 

"My husband returned yesterday from 
France. He served and fought from Chateau 
Thierry until the armistice was signed. He 
was in the 28th Division and went in as a pri- 
vate. He has been service since July, 1917." 

Gage, Margaret, W., Cambridge, Mass.: 

"in the last five years I have been busy with 
war work (surgical dressings and sewing) and 
house work. I think I must have a char-woman 
as an ancestress as I find complete happiness 
in cleaning kitchen sinks and garbage pails." 



• 



82 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[July 



Guffey, Mary Emma (Mrs. Caroll Miller), 4 

Von Len place, Pittsburgh, Pa.: 

"As to what I have been doing in the last 
five years, have moved twice, bought two 
houses but hope we are permanently located 
now. When I wasn't moving and doing over 
houses, I was going through terrific times with 
the boys, first with Joeby and infantile paralysis, 
then John's accident from which he recovered 
entirely, and Joeby improves all the time. As 
to war work, started a Navy Aid Association in 
Aurora at the beginning of the war which did 
a lot of work for the Great Lake Training 
Station as well as equipping several hundred 
local boys for the navy. Worked with the 
Aurora Branch of the Red Cross called the 
Carry on Club, and when we left there said 
Club presented me with a silver sandwich plate, 
but I never could make out whether it was 
because I was leaving or because I gave the 
Club a Virginian luncheon." 



Hoyt, Mary F., Irvington-on-Hudson, N. Y.: 

"From 1915-17, preparedness. First Aid 
classes, surgical dressing, National Service 
School Camp, 1916-17 for home care of the 
sick. Dietetics, wireless, wigwag and sema- 
phore, surgical dressings and drill. June 20th, 
1917, sailed for France. Commenced work 
July 9th as auxiliary nurse in American Am- 
bulance Hospital, Neuilly which was taken 
over by American Red Cross, July 22, from 
which date to February 9, 1919 when it closed. 
I worked there ,with the exception of six weeks, 
May and June 1918, when I went up to Beauvais 
to a first line evacuation French Hospital as 
interpreter aid for A. E. F. for our boys. In 
February 1918, I was lent to the American Red 
Cross canteen department to open a canteen at 
Chambery for Italian troops, but although 
Bess Bissell and I think that if we had been at 
the head it would have been a success, it fell 
through and we were listed as spies." 



Hahn, Dorothy A., 409 Orange Street, New 
Haven, Conn. 



Hubbard, Charlotte A. (Mrs. Horatio S. 
Goddell), Houghton, Mich. 



Hall, Margaret, 42 Fenway, Boston, Mass.: 
Red Cross canteen worker 1918-19 Chalons, 
France. See letter in last Quarterly. 

Hamilton, Elizabeth Porter (Mrs. John D. 
Falconbridge), Toronto, Canada. 

Hardy, Cora (Mrs. Edwin Seton Jarrett), 130 
West 57th Street, New York City. 

Hooper, Ethel E. (Mrs. Martin R. Edwards), 
Wayland, Mass. 

Hopkins, Nellie L. (Mrs. Arthur S. Todd), 
Greenwich, Conn. 

Houghton, Katherlne M. (Mrs. Thomas M. 

Hepburn), Hartford, Conn.: 

"During the past five years I have been doing 
suffrage work as usual, except that two years 
ago I resigned from the presidency of the Con- 
necticut Woman Suffrage Association to work 
with the National Woman's Party. I am now 
a member of the National Executive Board of 
the National Woman's Party and the Chair- 
man for Connecticut. During the war I was a 
member of the Social Hygiene Division of the 
State Council of Defense. I have had one 
more daughter, born a year ago, making in all 
three boys and two girls." 



Hubbard, Sibyl (Mrs. Herbert S. Darlington), 
Radnor, Pa. 

Irwin, Martha E., Princeton, N. J. 

Jeffers, Evetta T. (Mrs. Schock), 37 East 

Main Street, Mount Joy, Pa. 

"in the last five years I have changed my 
home from York to Mt. Joy, my profession 
from teaching to matrimony, my name from 
Jeffers to Schock, my outside work from club 
and Young Women's Christian Association work 
to chairmanship of the Red Cross which I am 
still holding down." 

Keay, Frances A. (Mrs. Thomas P. Ballard), 

Cambridge, Mass. 

Cataloguer, Law Library, Harvard Law 
School, 1917-1919. Two sons. 

Kilpatrick, Ellen P., 1027 St. Paul Street, 

Baltimore, Md. 

"i have forgotten what happened before 
September 15, 1917. On that date I sailed for 
France to do canteen work under the Ameri- 
can Red Cross. For the first six months I 
had the great privilege of working in a Cantine 
des Deux Drapeaux after that I worked in 
American Rest Stations, the canteens run by 
the Red Cross at the railway stations along the 



1919] 



Class Reunions 



S3 



American lines of communication. I got back 
to America on Thanksgiving Day 1918." 

Lautz, May (Mrs E. M. Sutliff), 885 West 

End Avenue, New York City: 

"i thought nothing could keep me away from 
this twentieth reunion, but here I am miles off 
in the Maine woods with my husband, who was 
ordered away from business for a while — and 
I can't come back just now! I've always been 
somewhere at the ends of the earth when re- 
union time came around. The last one found 
me in the Philippines, I believe, and the one 
before that in South America. 

"I've proved my love for Bryn Mawr, 
though, by having two younger sisters graduate, 
one in 1912, and one in 1916. 

"Greetings and love to you all, and if I'm 
not entirely forgotten I'll truly be with you 
next time. 

'I'm enclosing a bit for the fund." 

Levering, Ethel, (Mrs. James Marvin Mot- 
ley), 704 Cathedral Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Loshe, Lillie D., 1 West 81st Street, New York 

City.: 

Teacher in Canton Christian College, Canton, 
China. 

Lawther, Evelyn T. (Mrs. 0. D. Odell), 
Indianapolis, Ind. 



Morice, Jane R. (Mrs. Thomas E. Pooley) 

Bryn Mawr, Pa.: 

Husband in Service, Captain, now living in 
Cairo, Egypt. 

Morris, Evelyn F. (Mrs. Francis R. Cope, Jr.), 
Demock, Pa. 

Nichols, Content S., 95 Carroll Street, Bing- 

hamton, N. Y. 

*T thought these five years had been brimful 
of work and enjoyment, but I see that 100 
words will hold them all. I have taught in 
school, played Second Vice-President at home, 
and shared in civic and church doings: well, 
and got run over by an automobile. I have 
sometimes helped manage a summer school for 
untaught children, and have visited with my 
delightfully growing family and with my friends, 
delightfully ever the same. We all shared the 
sorrows and the exaltations of the war : I helped 
with Red Cross work, questionnaires, and the 
Four Minute Women Campaign." 

Norcross, Mary J., Carlyle, Pa. 

Oglevee, Jessie E. (Mrs H. H. Tanner), 
Minneapolis, Minn. 

Orrick, Christine (Mrs. Wm. C. Fordyce), 
St. Louis, Mo. 
Died March 1919. 



McBurney, Alice (Mrs. Austin F. Riggs), 
Stockbridge, Mass. 

Marble, Elizabeth D., Los Angeles, Cal. 

Matsuda, Michi, Kyoto, Japan. 

Teacher in Doshiska College, Kyoto, Japan. 

Middendorf, Katherine (Mrs. H. C. Black- 
well), 210 West State Street, Trenton, N. J. : 
In the spring of 1917 I went in for first aid 
and home nursing. In the fall of 1917 I was 
active in the first Liberty Loan campaign; then 
came two courses in surgical dressing in which 
I became an instructor. I was also a member of 
the Food Conservation Committee in Trenton. 
During the last winter, I have been an inspector 
of refugee garments for the Red Cross. I 
should like to add that my twin brothers have 
seen service in France and my brother William 
has received the Croix de Guerre. 



Palmer, Madeline (Mrs. Charles M. Bake- 
well), 437 Hemphrey St., New Haven, Conn. 
Madeline Palmer Bakewell has spent the 
last five years in New Haven where Mildred 
Palmer was born June 14, 1917. During the 
war the Red Cross occupied all her time. She 
served as director of the Wayland House Auxili- 
ary, treasurer of the Glenmore Auxiliary, and 
worker at the railroad canteen which still 
continues its activities. Charles Montague 
Bakewell, Major American Red Cross, has 
spent the last year in Italy where he is writing 
a history of the Red Cross in Italy. 

Peckham, Laura (Mrs Edward H. Waring), 
47 Wootton Road, Essex Fells, N. J. 
1914r-1916, Women Club and Suffrage worker, 
1914-1919, Surgical dressing for American 
Society for Relief of French Wounded. Much 
knitting, 1917-1919; Foster mother to two busy 
babies. 



84 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[July 



Powell, Lillian A. (Mrs. John R. Fordyce), 
Little Rock, Ark. 

Ream, Marian B. (Mrs. Redmond D. Stephens). 
Red Cross canteen worker in France, 1918— 
1919. 

Schoneman, May C. (Mrs. Percival M. Sax), 
Overbrook, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Scudder, Sylvia C. (Mrs. Ingersoll Bowditch), 
Jamaica Plain, Mass. 

Sire, Dolly H. (Mrs. James C. Bradley), 
5518 Black Street, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Stelner, Amy L., 1512 Bolton Street, Balti- 
more, Md.: 
Young Men's Christian Association canteen 

worker in France 1919. 

Stirling, Margaret Y. (Mrs. J. Pembroke 

Thorn), 828 Park Avenue., Baltimore, Md. 
Stites, Sarah H., Simmons College, Boston, 
Mass. : 
I have been teaching economics at Simmons 
and for the last four years I have had charge of 
economics department. I enjoy the work and 
the life in Boston. Helen Hodge, 1900, and I 
live together in a little apartment in which we 
are always at home to Bryn Mawrters." 

Strauss, Sarah (Mrs. Alfred F. Hess), 16 West 
86th Street, New York City. 

Studdlford, Janetta G. (Mrs. Maxwell Reed), 
Wellesley Hills, Mass. 

Thayer, Aurie C. (Mrs. M. K. Yoakum), 
Providence, R. I. 

Thurber, Mary D. (Mrs. Henry S. Dennison), 

Framinghahi, Mass. : 

Abroad March to June 1919 in Denmark, 
Norway, England. 

Towle, Mary R., 165 Broadway, New York 

City. 

Lawyer — in partnership with Bertha Rem- 
baugh, '97. 

Tyler, Eleanor J., 1303 Linden Avenue, 

Baltimore, Md. 

"Have helped the Red Cross by making 
dressings and surgical supplies and wherever 
else I could." 



Walker, Evelyn, 119 Park Street, Brookline, 
Mass. : 
I was abroad in 1913-1914 and found my- 
self in Austria when war broke out. I returned 
without undue difficulty and for three years 
was again at Simmons College in Boston, for 
one year as acting dean and for two in my old 
position as registrar. Since then I have been 
a free lance working about half time last winter 
at the Technology workroom in Boston and 
for part time this winter. The work was for 
technology men in service and also for various 
relief organizations." 

1904 

The fifteenth Reunion of 1904 was attended 
by forty-three of the class. Jeanette Hemphill 
acted as toastmistress at the reunion dinner, 
which was held in Denbigh Hall on Saturday, 
May 31. 

The class gift is a scholarship to be known as 
the "Constance Lewis Memorial Scholarship of 
the Class of 1904." It has been awarded to a 
junior for the year 1919-1920. 

Jane Allen has been elected chairman of the 
Women Teacher's Organization of Philadelphia, 
and first vice-president of the State Teachers 
League of Pennsylvania. 

Eleanor Bliss has published a paper entitled, 
"Some Problems of International Readjustment 
of Mineral Supplies as Indicated in Recent For- 
eign Literature." At present she is with Anna 
Jonas in Maryland doing field work for the 
United States Geodetic Survey. 

Virginia Chauvenet served on the theatrical 
board, which supplied entertainers for the Army 
CamDS in Europe. 

Edith McMurtrie had a picture in the annual 
exhibition of the Academy of Fine Arts of 
Philadelphia. 

Helen Howell Moorhead spent last winter at 
headquarters in Washington in charge of all 
Red Cross Surgical Dressings for the United 
States Army. 

Anne Buzby Palmer spoke at the college 
breakfast. She was recently elected first vice- 
president of the Saturday Club at Wayne. 

Isabel Peters has returned from canteen work 
in France. She gave an interesting talk on this 
work at the alumnae dinner. 

Irene Rossiter has been serving as a trained 
nurse in an army hospital. 

The program included: "Over There," I. 
Peters (returned Red Cross canteen worker); 



1919] 



Class Reunions 



85 



"War Conditions at Home," M. Canan Fry; 
"The Shock Troops of Washington," H. Howell 
Moorhead, head of Red Cross Surgical Dress- 
ings of the United States; "Current Events," 
by A. Buzby Palmer; "Teachers in Politics," J. 
Allen; "Overseas Theatre League," Virginia 
Chauvenet; "The Only One," Edna Shearer. 
The class went on a supper picnic on Sunday. 

1908 

1908 set its clock one year behind and cele- 
brated its tenth reunion in 1919. Marjorie 
Young was in charge of the general get-together, 
which opened officially with a picnic to the 
Class of 1909. This function began with about 
eight in attendance, but ended with some fif- 
teen of each class encamped in the hollow for 
a song contest, in which 1909 greatly outdid 
1908. 

Forty of the class were in Bryn Mawr at 
different times, and thirty-six attended the 
class supper. For this Margaret Duncan was 
general manager, Alice Sacks Plant, in charge 
of decorations, and Louise Folly Finerty, the 
toast mistress. Many were the lines of activity 
revealed at this gathering. One of the out- 
standing achievements of the class is its record 
of one hundred and fourteen children, which, 
according to Miss Applebee, brings it second 
only to the Class of 1911 in percentage of chil- 
dren per person. Beside plain mothers of from 
one to four children, the class boasts lawyers, 
teachers, farmers, at least one M.D. and one 
Ph.D., an efficiency expert, playwright, a 
buyer of dresses, one who has helped produce 
airplanes, and who has helped run the State 
Department, Suffrage and civic workers, and 
many who have done war work both here and 
abroad. Altogether there was revealed a diver- 
sity of occupations which did not enter into the 
vision of the class ten years ago. 

Rachel Moore Warren, ex-'08. 

1909 

The tenth reunion of the class was held in 
Pembroke West from May 30 to June 4. The 
dinner, which took place on May 31 in Pembroke 
dining room and was attended by 34 members 
of the class, was most successfully managed by 
Katharine Ecob, to whose glory be it said that 
she accepted the nomination for toast mistress 
and more than fulfilled all the high qualities per- 
taining to that office. There were many toasts 
on "how we won the war" and other topics. 



Hono sang to the ukele, Pleas danced "Joseph- 
ine" and D. Child favored us with the new- 
old folk song "Santa Lucia." It was 1.30 a.m. 
when we put our feet on the table for the class 
song. 

The days that followed were full of events and 
reminiscences for all who were fortunate enough 
to be able to stay through. Tuesday was a red 
letter day because our class daughter (we can 
hardly call her a baby any longer) spent it with us ! 
She wore the 1909 costume and headed the pro- 
cession down to the athletic field, and, although 
'99 won the prize for the best costume and 1911 
that for possessing the largest number of babies, 
we are sure that, if there had been a prize 
awarded for individual merit in babies, Grace 
Hedwig would have carried it off for 1909. Our 
gift to the Endowment Fund amounted to 
something over one thousand dollars up to Com- 
mencement Day and before all the returns are in 
we expect it will be much larger and are proud 
that it should stand as our Memorial to Marie 
Belleville. 

The 1909 Bulletin is to be revived under the 
management of a Committee of which Pleas- 
aunce Baker is the chairman. Please send news 
of any kind to her at any time. 

Marguerite Adler (Mrs. Louis Schwartz), 
ex-'09, graduated one of the first ten in the class 
of 1919. 

Fannie S. Barber has been honorably dis- 
charged from the service (nursing) and has ac- 
cepted a position as a teacher in Miss Chandler's 
School in New York for next year. 

Marie Belleville died of tumor on the brain 
in Shanghai, China, March 8. 

Georgina Biddle is doing home visiting for the 
Home Service Department of the Red Cross in 
New York City. 

Margaret Bontecou returned from Germany 
in May and is resting on her laurels, a veteran 
of the 32nd Division of the United States Army. 

Dorothy Child is chief of the Division of 
Child Welfare of the (State Department of 
Health of Pennsylvania. She is the first woman 
to hold this position. 

Julia Doe (Mrs. L. R. Shero) has a daughter, 
born early in May, 1919. 

Bertha Ehlers has been running Rockefeller 
Hall for the month of May. She expects to do 
some sort of special work this summer prepara- 
tory to filling the proposed position of Execu- 
tive Secretary in the Alumnae Association. 

Frances Ferris returned from France some 
months ago and is making preparations to do 



86 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[July 



work in an interesting new school near Phila- 
delphia next winter. 

Catharine Goodale (Mrs. Rawson Warren) 
will probably spend the summer in the Eastern 
States since her husband has recently been or- 
dered to travel. 

Helen Jurist died of influenza on January 22. 

Dorothy Miller is married and living in Phila- 
delphia. 

Helen Mills has been married to Andrew 
Weisenberg. They are living at 2310 Pine 
Street, Philadelphia. 

Mary Nearing has completed a very success- 
ful year studying landscape gardening at Har- 
vard University. 

Dorothy North has returned to France to 
continue work in the Friends' Reconstruction 
Unit. 

Anna Piatt completes her fourth year at the 
Johns Hopkins Medical School this spring and 
has accepted an interneship at the Woman's 
Infirmary, New York City, for the coming year. 

May Putnam is head of two baby clinics in 
Waltham, Massachusetts, and in her spare time 
does work under Dr. Alfred Worcester. 

Shirley Putnam is working in France for the 
American Library Association, distributing books 
to the various hospitals and recreation centers 
of the United State Army. 

Alta Stevens has announced her engagement 
to Dr. Anson Cameron of Chicago. Dr. Cam- 
eron has just returned from Red Cross work in 
France. They will probably be married in 
September. 

Cynthia Wesson has been transferred from 
the Base Hospital at Lake wood to General Hos- 
pital 41, Staten Island, New York. 

1911 

The class of 1911 held a class supper on Sat- 
urday evening, in Merion, at which L. Russell 
was toastmistress and the speakers were: L. 
Houghteling, Amy Walker, the class president; 
I. Rogers, E. Richardson, M. Smith Goodnow. 
At the class meeting a hundred dollar Liberty 
bond was given to start the million-dollar drive. 

Perhaps the most notable thing about 191 1's 
eight reunion was the fact that the class won 
the prize for the baby-record. There are 
seventy-five babies in the class, which was the 
highest record, taking into consideration the 
number of years the class has been out of col- 
lege and the number of its members that are 
married, achieved by any of the reunion classes 



this year. On the day of the alumnae parade, 
little Dorothea Seelye, the daughter of Kate 
Chambers Seelye, '11, and the niece of Dorothea 
Chambers, '19, marched proudly at the head of 
the procession and received the tin horn in 
token of the position held by her mother's class. 
It is significant that during the reunion days, 
1911 received two notices of additional 1911 
babies. Margaret Dulles Deane (Mrs. Edward 
Deane) telegraphed her class greetings from her- 
self and her day-old daughter and the telegram 
was read at the class supper. The birth of a son 
to Constance Wilbur McKeehan (Mrs. Joseph 
McKeehan) was announced. The little boy 
was born three weeks before reunion. Another 
one-time member of the class, May Margaret 
Egan, was married the very day of the class 
supper at her home in Amboy, Illinois. Her 
husband is John Stogdell Stokes of Morristown, 
N.J. 

191 l's permanent officers proved not to be as 
permanent as the class had thought them to be ! 
Amy Walker Field (Mrs. James Field) and 
Dorothy Coffin Greeley (Mrs. Samuel Greeley) 
presented their resignations to the astonished 
class at the class meeting. Leila Houghteling 
was elected class officer in their place. The 
class drive for Liberty Bonds for the faculty 
endowment was begun by the gift of a hundred 
dollar bond at the class meeting. 

The reunion was held in Merion with twenty- 
one present at the class supper on Saturday 
night. Louise Russell was toastmistress, and 
Louise Russell, Norvelle Browne and Elizabeth 
Taylor Russell (Mrs. John F. Russell, Jr.) com- 
posed the reunion committee. The speakers 
at the class supper were Amy Walker Field, 
Leila Houghteling, Isobel Rogers, Kate Cham- 
bers Seelye, Margery Smith Goodnow, and 
Ethel Richardson. Those present at the re- 
union were: Louise Russell, Norvelle Brown, 
Mary Taylor, Amy Walker Field, Dorothy Cof- 
fin Greeley, Leila Houghteling, Isobel Rogers, 
Ethel Richardson, Frances Porter Adler, Mil- 
dred Janney Ashbrook, Harriet Couch Coombs, 
Anna Stearns, Jessie Clifton, Iola Seeds McGan- 
non, Kate Chambers Seelye, Willa Alexander 
Browning, Carol Justice, Isabelle Miller, Blanche 
Cole, Margery Smith Goodnow, Ellen Pottberg. 

1912 

The class of 1912 held an informal reunion 
to which 31 members were back, which culmin- 
ated in a picnic on Saturday evening. Mary 



1919] 



Class Reunions 



87 



Pierce and L. Watson made an appeal for the 
million-dollar fund at the class meeting in the 
afternoon and the class pledged itself to raise 
$25,000. 

1914 

Forty-eight members of 1914 were in Pem- 
broke holding their fifth reunion. Helen Kirk 
was in charge of arrangements. The class sup- 
per was held on Saturday night in Rockefeller 
with Mary Coolidge as toastmistress. A unique 
feature was a short speech by each member of 
the class, giving her address and her work. 
Leah Cadbury spoke on her work in France, 
Katherine Dodd on medicine; Winifred Goodall 
on "Survivals," and Elizabeth Ayer, who came 
directly from the New York dock where she had 
landed that morning, on Red Cross work in 
France. 

1915 

1915's reunion opened with a class meeting in 
the drawing room of Rockefeller on Saturday, 
May 31. Katherine W. McCollin took the 
chair in the absence of either the president or 
vice president. In the course of the meeting 
Adrienne Kenyon Franklin was elected second 
vice president and Dorothea Moore, treasurer. 
It was voted to give up sending wedding pres- 
ents. The minutes of the meeting will be pub- 
lished in the next class bulletin which will come 
in May, 1920. 

The class supper was held on the terrace of 
Pen-y-groes that evening. Adrienne Kenyon 
Franklin was toastmistress. Speeches were 
made by: Mildred Justice, Helen Taft, Doro- 
thea Moore, Margaret Free, Isabel Smith and 
Isabel Foster. It was voted just before the 
close to raise $5000 by next November for the 
Million Dollar Endowment Fund. Katherine 
McCollin made the closing speech. 

A picnic at the Old Mill was enjoyed by about 
15 members of the class on Monday evening. 
Supper was cooked over an open fire and classic 
songs were sung under the leadership of Isabel 
Smith, Katherine McCollin and Mildred 
Jacobs. 

Among those at the reunion were: Mary 
Albertson, Rachel Ash, Frances Boyer, Phyllis 
Collins Waters, Marguerite Darkow, Julia Dem- 
ing, Gertrude Emery, Olga Erbsloh, Isabel Fos- 
ter, Margaret Free, Eleanor Freer Willson, Ruth 
Glenn Pennell, Mary Monroe Harlan, Mary- 
Goodhue, Louise Hollings worth, Ruth Hopkin- 
son, Ruth Hubbard, Mildred Jacobs, Mildred 



Justice, Adrienne Kenyon Franklin, Dora Levin- 
son, Amy Martin, Katherine McCollin, Doro- 
thea Moore, Emily Noyes, Miriam Rohrer, 
Merle Samson Toll, Celia Sargent, Katherine 
Shaefer, Isabel Smith, Elsie Stelzer, Cleora 
Sutch, Helen Taft, Ruth Tinker Morse, Ruth 
Tuttle, Mallory Webster, Margaret Yost, 
Isolde Zwecker, Edna Kraus Greenfield, Gladys 
Pray and Helen Zimmerman. 

A cable message of greetings came from 
Zena Blanc in Bourges, France, and a telegram 
from Florence Hatton Kelton in Columbus, 
Ohio. Harriet Bradford sent a letter. 

The following letter was received from Agnes 
Burchard's father: 

"May 4, 1919. 
"My dear Miss McCollin: 

My daughter Agnes will certainly not be able 
to attend your '15 dinner. She is now in War- 
saw, Poland, acting as Secretary to the Ameri- 
can Red Cross Deputy Commissioner, Major H. 
W. Taylor, on the A. R. C. Poland Commission. 
Major Taylor wrote me that he selected Agnes 
from among many applicants. Before leaving 
for Poland, she had been Secretary to Major 
Alexander Lambert, Head of the Medical Serv- 
ice of the A. R. C. in France, at their Paris 
headquarters, and to Major Taylor as his suc- 
cessor. 

"She sailed last August, having been selected 
by Dr. Lambert because of her ability to trans- 
late and write French and German. On her 
way to Paris, she went through an air raid in 
London and then through one (at least, — she 
has not been very communicative as to those,) 
in Paris. In January, she was invalided to 
San Raphael, on the C6te d'Azur, but returned 
in time to join the Poland Commission, which 
left for Poland, via Berne, Innsbruck, and 
Vienna, on a Red Cross special train, which 
took eight days to make the trip. 

"I have not heard from her under later date 
than March 31st. When she was in Warsaw 
and enjoying her adventure and experience, al- 
though for thirty days she had been awaiting 
her trunk which had been supposed to leave 
Paris with her on the 21st of February. 

"She says the Commission was received with 
the wildest enthusiasm by the Poles and her 
last letter describes the great impression made 
upon her by a peasant girl of less than twenty- 
five, uniformed as a man, who had been fighting 
as a Corporal of Heavy Artillery around Lem- 
berg (Lwow) (Lvov) and who seemed to her a 
Polish Jeanne D'Arc. She says the American 



88 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[July 



girls felt ashamed of their having food and 
clothes and shelter as this peasant girl stood up 
at the end of their long table, before about 
eighty Americans, and told (through an inter- 
preter) her heroic and terribly pathetic story, — 
how, with the men killed off, the women had 
manned the guns and were attending training 
camps to qualify as officers. 

"if any one should want to write Agnes, I 
know she would be glad to have a letter. Her 
address is American Red Cross Post-Office, 2, 
Place de Rivoli, Paris (Ier) France, with, in the 
lower left-hand corner 'With Major H. W. 
Taylor, Poland Commission, Warsaw, Poland.' 
Of course, I shall forward your letter to her. 
Yours very truly 

Lewis S. Buchard, 
586 Lexington Ave, 
N. Y. City." 

1916 

1916 held their reunion in Rockefeller Hall 
but had their class banquet in Denbigh. Con- 
stance Kellen, the class president, who has 
recently returned from France, was in charge of 
the arrangements. Larie Klein was the toast- 
mistress, and speeches were made by Dorothy 



Packard, Constance Dowd, Constance Kellen 
and Polly Branson. About thirty members 
were present. 

1917 

With nowhere to go, but reunioning just the 
same, 1917 flocked back to college on Friday 
and Saturday, and Saturday evening had a pic- 
nic on the campus instead of a class supper in 
one of the halls. 

1918 

Forty-six members of the class of 1918, re- 
turned for their first reunion. The head- 
quarters were in Pembroke East, and the class 
supper in Rockefeller. Virginia Kneeland was 
in charge and was also toastmistress. E. 
Houghton, H. Huff, Mrs. Ruth Cheney Streeter, 
M. Rupert and Mrs. Lucy Evans Chew made 
speeches at the supper. 

At the class meeting it was voted that a reun- 
ion gift of $5000 should be given to the Victory 
Chair of French, as a memorial to Amelia Rich- 
ards and Louise Tunstall Smith, who died in 
war service. ' The class succeeded in raising this 
amount in time for President Thomas to an- 
nounce at Commencement. 



CAMPUS NOTES 



President Thomas and Dean Taft are in 
Europe this summar arranging for the exchange 
of women professors between women's colleges 
in the United States and foreign countries. 
They are doing this as representatives of the 
international relations committee of the Asso- 
ciation of Collegiate Alumnae. 

President Thomas has also been appointed by 
the Association of Laboratory Science among 
Women to offer Mme. Currie, the famous physi- 
cist, $2000 to come to the United States in 
1920-21 to lecture in women's colleges. 

Dean Taft expects to return to this country 
the first of September, when she will enter upon 
her duties as acting president of the college. 
She will live at Penygroes, the deanery remain- 
ing closed through the winter. 

President Thomas will then begin her trip 
around part of the world, as she will not visit 
China and Japan again. She has divided her 
journey into five main sections and has invited 
a traveling companion for each section. Dr. 
Anna Howard Shaw had been selected the first 



section and Mrs. Emmeline Pankhurst will prob- 
ably go to India with President Thomas. The 
sections are as follows: — 1, Spain and North 
Africa, including as much of the Sahara Desert 
as it is possible to visit; 2, India, Siam and Java; 

3, Egypt and a three weeks' caravan trip, with 
tents and camels, across the Isthmus of Suez to 
Palestine, and from Palestine through parts of 
Mesopotamia, including Damascus, Beirut, 
Bagdad and the ruins of Babylon and Nineveh; 

4, Greece, the Aegean Islands, part of Asia 
Minor, Constantinople and Anatolia; 5, a motor 
trip through England, Scotland and Wales. 

TO VISIT SCHOOL GIRLS 

President Thomas expects to visit girls' 
schools, especially missionary schools, with a 
view to determining whether they would be able 
to prepare their cleverest girls to enter women's 
colleges here, if a sufficient number of four-year 
scholarships could be provided. She thinks this 
is the most practical way of helping Oriental 
women to help themselves. 



1919] 



Campus Notes 



89 



USE OF SAGE FUND 

Bryn Mawr has set aside $200,000 from the 
Russell Sage Fund to belong to the Teachers' 
Life Insurance and Annuity Association or to 
some other pension association, as the result of 
a vote of the Board of Trustees. The salaries of 
five full professors will also be increased $1000, 
from a sum of $112,000, to be called the Mar- 
garet Olivia Sage Professorship Fund, it was 
voted at the same meeting. The professors, 
recommended by the full professors of the col- 
lege, will be elected by the trustees' executive 
committee. 

PRICE OF BOARD RAISED 

"The price of board next year will have to 
be raised from $225 to $300 to meet the rising 
cost of food," President Thomas announced in 
Chapel in May. This increase is necessary to 
prevent a $30,000 deficit which the college will 
incur this year in spite of the emergency fees. 

This year's emergency fee of $100, increased 
from the $50 fee of 1917-18, was expected to 
meet any possible rise in the prices of coal, pro- 
visions, and wages, she continued, but it has 
proved wholly inadequate as all three have 
soared far above maximum estimates. The 
emergency fee will be indispensable next year 
for teaching-salaries, since the income from the 
endowment funds in addition to tuition fees 
will not even meet academic expenses. "The 
teaching salaries have risen only 10 per cent, 
that is, they will amount to only $16,000 more 
next year than in 1914," said President Thomas, 
"while the cost of living has increased much 
more than 10 per cent. The salaries ought to 
be doubled if there were money with which to 
do it." 

Will Raise Room-rent 

"if means are not provided with which to 
meet the $85,000 deficit estimated in the budget 
for 1919-1920, it may be necessary in a few 
years to close the college," she added. "This 
year's deficit is due to the fact that the college 
table and the running of the college halls have 
cost more than the students pay. The emer- 
gency fees will cover $35,000 of this next year's 
deficit, but it will not be possible to meet the 
remaining $50,000, unless full cost is charged 
for table board, and the rent for some rooms is 



raised. The college has therefore been com- 
pelled to raise the rent of the larger double and 
single suites in each hall $50, and in special 
cases a little more than $50. All graduate rooms 
will be increased from their present price of $50 
to $100. President Thomas is meeting all the 
students affected by this increase and asking 
them to let her know of cases where the increase 
works special hardship. 

Eighty Vacancies for Freshmen 

"One hundred and eighty sub-Freshmen have 
applied for residence next year," announced 
President Thomas finally, "and there will be 
only eighty vacancies left for them." 

CHANGES IN FACULTY 

Among changes in the faculty for next year 
is the resignation of Dr. Peebles, Associate Pro- 
fessor of Physiology, on account of ill-health, 
and that of Dr. Patch, Associate in English 
Philology. Dr. Patch has accepted a professor- 
ship at Smith College. Miss Lanman, In- 
structor (elect) in Chemistry, has resigned to 
accept a fellowship at Radcliffe. Miss Helen 
Noyes and Miss Emily Noyes, Instructors in 
English, are leaving. 

Dr. Frank has been called to a professorship 
at Johns Hopkins. 

Dr. Huff, Professor of Physics; Dr. Carpenter, 
Professor of Archaeology; Dr. Savage, Associate 
Professor of Rhetoric, and Dr. Crenshaw, 
Associate in Physical Chemistry, all of whom 
have been granted leave of absence for military 
service, will return next year. Dr. Savage will 
give his course in technique of the drama. 

Miss Edith E. Ware, Instructor of American 
History at Smith College for five years, has been 
appointed Lecturer in American History, to act 
as substitute for Dr. William Roy Smith. Miss 
Ware received her A.B. degree from Goucher 
College and Ph.D. from Columbia. 

Helen Irvin, '15, will be an Instructor in 
English. Miss Irvin has been Teacher of 
English and Science in the Bryn Mawr School, 
Baltimore, for four years. Miss Ellinger, who 
has been an English Reader this year, has been 
appointed a full-time instructor. 

Miss Blake, Demonstrator in Physics, will 
also be manager of Dalton Hall. 



90 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[July 



GENERAL LITERATURE TEST 

The answers to the last two questions in the 
General Literature test follow: 

7. Who said the following: 

a. "Roll up the map of Europe." Ans. — 
Pitt after Austerlitz. 

b. "A beautiful and ineffectual angel." — 
Arnold's description of Shelley. 

c. "The guard dies but it does not surrender." 
—The Old Guard at Waterloo. 

d. "I bring you peace with honour." — Dis- 
raeli after his return from the Congres of Berlin. 

e. "Rum, Romanism and rebellion." — Slogan 
used against Cleveland in the Blaine-Cleveland 
campaign. 

f. "Kiss me, Hardy." — Lord Nelson to the 
captain of the "Victory" at Trafalgar. 

g. "A scrap of paper." — von Bethmann- 
Hollweg. 

h. "Non dolet." — Arria, Roman matron in 
Pliny's Letters. 

i. "Vicisti, Galilaee." — Emperor Julian. 

j. "Take away that bauble." — Cromwell, 
about the crown of England. 

8. a. What was Cashel Byron's profession! — 
Prizefighter. 

b. Who tried to extract sunshine out of 
cucumbers? — Professors at Lagado in Gulliver's 
Travels. 

c. Whose gory visage was sent down what 
stream, to what shore? — Orpheus's gory visage 
down the swift Hebrus to the Lesbian shore. 

d. Who could not keep whose head out of his 
manuscript? — Mr. Dick could not keep Charles 
I's head out of his manuscript, in David Copper- 
field. 

e. Whose eyes were like emeralds? — Bea- 
trice's, when Dante meets her at the end of the 
Purgatorio . 

f. Who went once a year to cool him on the 
floe? — Judas, in Kipling's Last Chanty. 

g. Who are the Struldbrugs? — People who are 
immortal, in Gulliver's Travels. 

h. What story was left half-told? — Story of 
Cambuscan, in the Squire's Tale. 

i. When does the Mount of Purgatory shake? 
— When a soul feels its own desires in exact 
harmony with the will of God and is ready to 
ascend. 

j. Who was the Old Man of the Sea? — Pro- 
teus, and also a character in the Voyages of Sin- 
bad the Sailor. 



k. Who voyaged in the "Beagle?" — Charles 
Darwin. 

1. What were the names of the four little 
children who went around the world? — Violet, 
Slingsby, Guy, and Lionel. 

m. Who was black but comely? — The spouse 
in The Song of Songs. 

n. Who was cross-gartered? — Malvolio. 

o. Who went upstairs to put on her scarlet 
stockings with silver clocks? — Beatrice Esmond. 

p. Who had a leg? — Sir Willoughby Patterne 
in The Egotist. 

q. Who has a nose? — Cyrano de Bergerac. 

The "six-year hoodoo" to quote the Col- 
lege News proved fatal to 1919 and the seniors 
broke instead of rolling their hoops after the 
fourth oral. The two other classes who have 
had to do this were: 1907 and 1913. A hoop, 
according to this college organ, bearing the 
date 1913 which escaped destruction and was in 
the posession of one of this year's seniors is 
suspected of carrying ill luck down the years. 

Among the students who will not return to 
college this fall are: 1920, Lois Parsons, Eliza- 
beth Williams, Katharine Cauldwell, Beatrice 
Brumell, Margaret Train; 1921; Helen Parsons, 
Rebecca Marshall, Helena Riggs, Edith Farns- 
worth, Elizabeth Boland; 1922, Harriet Gibbs, 
Margaret Krech, Alice Lee. 

Helen Hill, '21, has been experimenting with 
her dog this summer at the request of Dr. Leuba, 
in an effort to find out what senses are involved 
in following a trail. 

The pupils of the Model School have published 
the first number of a magazine entitled Pagoda 
Sketches. It was dedicated to President Thomas. 
Among the contributions are a story called 
"Mr. Wiskers,"by Fredericade Laguna, a poem 
in the style of Robert Burns and one entitled 
"Crepuscule." 

The athletic board is planning a new form of 
organization which will be put before the asso- 
ciation this autumn. The officers of indoor and 
outdoor managers will be abolished and this 
board will consist of sport managers and a 
secretary-treasurer from the sophomore class. 
Six divisions of the sports have been made, 
which necessitates the addition of two more 
members to the board. The advance apparatus 
work may be put under the athletic association 
and made a minor sport with all four classes 
competing for the championship. 




Marie Elizabeth Belleville 



1919] 



In Memoriam 



91 



IN MEMORIAM 



HARRIET ROBBINS 

When '93 met on their twenty-fifth anni- 
versary, they thought with regret of Madeleine 
Abbott Bushnell, of Ruth Emerson Fletcher, 
and of one more member who will not return 
for a future class reunion — Harriet Robbins. 
Her death occurred in October. At the time 
she was teaching mathematics and history in 
the Hartford High School where she had been 
prepared for Bryn Mawr. 

Of her work there Mr. Clement B. Hyde, 
principal of the school, has written: "She 
showed the same characteristics of independent 
thought and leadership in her school work that 
she did as a pupil and in her life, in the home 
and in the community. No one was left in 
doubt as to how she stood on any question, 
and her position was almost invariably a sane 
one, her judgment being quick and accurate. " 

In Bryn Mawr Harriet Robbins did well in 
all her studies but excelled in History and 
Political Economy, her major subjects, taking 
in addition the post-major course in Nineteenth 
Century History. Professor Charles McLean 
Andrews, now of Yale, recalls that, as a student, 
she had a "thoroughly good mind, steady, even 
and naturally inquistive," while a recent talk 
he had with her before her death proved that 
she "thought much and well on questions of 
historical importance of the day." She con- 
tinued her education by travelling extensively 
in Europe, India, and in North and South 
America. 

One of her friends has well described her 
personality as magnetic, full of the joy of living, 
she gave to others much of her own strength and 
cheer. 

MARIE ELIZABETH BELLEVILLE 

The reunion of 1919 was saddened by the 
loss of one of the most loyal members of the 
class, Marie Belleville, who died of brain tumor 
in Shanghai, March 8. 

All of us instinctively think of her as star- 
ring in our basket-ball, our "sings" and our 
musical plays; perhaps not all of us appreciated 
as well her splendid mind and the depth and 
strength of her character; and only those of us 
who were in touch with her after college know 
how the years developed her confidence and 



brought out her unusual executive ability 
along many lines. 

Her first seven years out of college were 
spent in very successful teaching, first at the 
Lincoln School in Providence, then at the Lau- 
rel School in Cleveland and lastly at the Mar- 
garet Morrison Carnegie Technical School in 
Pittsburgh. With her unbounded energy, 
Marie found it possible not only to enter into 
the life of the students as few teachers do, but 
also to do a great deal outside, epecially in play- 
grounds and in the work of the Young Women's 
Christian Association. 

In 1916 she went to the West Side Branch of 
the Young Women's Christian Association in 
New York where she took up work in the Edu- 
cational and Social departments and for a time 
acted as general secretary. 

In August 1917 she sailed for China under the 
Foreign Department of the Association, and 
was appointed to Pekin for language study; 
she made a brilliant record, due not only to her 
natural intellectual ability, but also to a kind 
of gay audacity, which made her try out all 
she learned and imitate all she heard without 
the timidity which often hampers language 
students. This spirit was characteristic of her, 
and because of it she was able to do a surprising 
amount in the social and recreational work of 
the Peking Young Women's Christian Asso- 
ciation, even in her first year. 

In September 1918 she was transferred to the 
Association in Canton, to meet an emergency 
there; and though this necessitated a change 
of dialect and many other readjustments she 
went with her usual cheerful philosophy. In 
a letter of January 1919 she wrote: 

'I certainly have rushed in many a time 
where angels would have feared to tread — 
such as conducting meetings of the Social Com- 
mittee and trying to get over to them my idea 
of a track meet: also doing all the coaching for 
a Christmas play, conducting gym classes when 
I'd been here only two weeks, and all such wild 
things." 

One has to know the traditional drab, re- 
stricted life of Chinese girls and women to ap- 
preciate fully the significance for them of 
this recreational work and because of her vivid 
personality and her wholesome joy in living, 
Marie was able to communicate to them, as 



92 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[July 



few people can, something of the abundant 
life which she was trying to represent. 

Her splendid vitality and her strength of will 
were particulary evident during the last three 
months of her life, when, in spite of the recur- 
ring symptoms of illness, she kept at her study 
and work until a few days before her death. 

Letters from her friends in China are full of 
the highest tribute. One says, in part: 

"I think she is the most radiant person I have 

ever known I have never seen a 

girl of more ability We have the 



memory of a perfectly radiant personality, an 
absolutely true friend, one whose influence must 
live on and on in the lives of all those with 
whom she came in contact." 

The loss to all who knew her is more than 
can be put into words: but during these war 
years we have learned anew that length of days 
is by no means the only measure of a life; and 
for her we can only rejoice that a life so short 
here was so full of the joy of living and so rich 
in service. 

H. B. C. 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNA WORKS FOR COLLEGE 
WOMAN'S CLUB IN PARIS 



For a long time there has been a feeling among 
American college women in France that there 
should be a club house for them in Paris similar 
to the one in New York City, with sleeping ac- 
commodations, dining-room, registry, library 
and purchasing bureau for the members unable 
to come in to Paris. 

On the first Sunday of last October three col- 
lege women met in the studio of Helen Daven- 
port Gibbons to discuss a plan. The next Sun- 
day fourteen women came with ten colleges and 
universities represented. The following Sun- 
day forty-four college women came, with twenty- 
three colleges and universities represented. It 
was quite clear to us that a club is needed. It 
was also quite clear that nothing could be done 
until we had the cooperation from home. Every 
woman here has a job that takes all her time. 
A regularly appointed secretary must be sent 
and financed from home, someone who would 
devote all her time and talents to organizing 
and running the club. 

There are many reasons why such a venture 
should be undertaken. A few of the most im- 
portant are as follows: 

1. Present needs 

a. There are approximately one thousand 
American college women in France, most of 
whom will stay here or whose places will be 
taken by others, for at least a year after the 
close of the war. 

b. The crowded conditions of Paris and the 
lack of accommodations. The Y. W. C. A. 



cannot meet the needs of all the women on 
service. 

c. To care for the many college women in 
Paris during leaves and between assignments. 

d. To provide moderate accommodations: 
Prices to be regulated and under the control of 
a board of management. 

e. To provide a purchasing department to aid 
college women, especially those outside of Paris, 
who continually request such service. 

f. To keep a register of college women for 
present and future reference. 

g. To provide social relations between the 
women of our various colleges. 

2. Future needs 

a. To establish relations between the Ameri- 
can universities and the French universities. 

b. To provide a home and meeting place for 
American college women studying in France. 

The amount necessary to finance such an un- 
dertaking we cannot even suggest, but the ex- 
perience of the Y. W. C. A. and of the American 
University Union in Europe (for college men) 
are at your disposal and would be of valuable 
aid. 

We have no idea if such a movement is now on 
foot in America but we are acutely conscious of 
the need of it for it seems to us as though our 
many college women over here ought not to be 
lost sight of by their college organizations at 
home. 

Helen Davenport Gibbons, ex-06. 



1919] 



News from the Clubs 



93 



NEWS FROM THE CLUBS 



NEW YORK 

Officers for 1919-20 

President: Alice Day Jackson, '03 (Mrs. 
Percy Jackson). 

Vice-president: Theresa Helburn, '08. 

Treasurer: Dorothy Forster Miller, '07 (Mrs. 
R. Bleeker Miller). 

Assistant Treasurer: Janet R. Grace, '17. 

Secretary: Evelyn Holt, ex-'09 (Mrs. Philip 
W. Lowry). 

Chairman of Entertainment Committee: 
Theresa Helburn, '08. 

Chairman of Admissions Committee: Helen 
Carey, '14. 

Chairman of House Committee: Louise Fleisch- 
mann, '06. 

BOSTON 
Officers for 1919-20 

President: Sylvia Lee, '01. 

Vice-president and Treasurer: Sylvia Scudder 
Bowditch, '01 (Mrs. Ingersoll Bowditch). 

Recording Secretary: Evelyn Walker, '01. 

Corresponding Secretary: Anna D. Fry, '99. 

Chairman of House Committee: Hannah T. 
Rowley, '01. 

Chairman of Membership Committee: Made- 
line F. Fauvre Wiles, '08 (Mrs. Thomas L. 
Wiles). 

Director: Katherine Williams Hodgdon, '13 
(Mrs. Waldo C. Hodgdon). 

PITTSBURGH 

The Bryn Mawr Club of Pittsburgh held its 
last meeting at the summer home of Minnie 
List Chalfant (Mrs. Frederick Chalfant) on 
Saturday, May 31. 

The members came in time for a picnic lunch- 
eon under the trees in the orchard. The busi- 
ness meeting and annual election were held in 



the afternoon. The following officers were 
elected: President, Helen Schmidt; vice-presi- 
dent, Margaret Free; secretary, Harrietta 
Magofflin; treasurer, Minnie List Chalfant. 

The Club has continued its efforts to arouse 
interest in Bryn Mawr in this part of the state 
and sent very attractive posters, announcing 
its offer of a free scholarship to all the High 
and Preparatory schools in Allegheny County. 
There were two applicants for the scholarship 
who have just taken their examinations. One 
of them will enter in the autumn, we hope. It 
seems to us that every Bryn Mawr club should 
offer at least one scholarship. There are only 
about twelve of us who ever attend the meet- 
ings, and if such a small group can manage to 
raise $200, surely there could be many small 
clubs throughout the country who could do 
likewise. 

We are also continuing the support of our 
French orphan. This will be our fourth year. 
Besides, we are clothing a little girl, five years 
old, whom we secured through the Home Find- 
ing Department of the Juvenile Court Associa- 
tion. Perhaps other clubs will be encouraged to 
try this particular sort of altruistic work when 
they learn that the entire cash outlay for the 
child for the year amounted to only $15.54. 
Of course that amount would not provide all 
the clothing necessary for the child; we provided 
in addition, partly worn or out grown clothing 
which was collected from our own members. This 
Is the second child whom we have clothed in 
this way and we highly recommend it as altru- 
istic work, that is possible for any club or group 
of Bryn Mawrters, no matter how few they may 
be. Now that the Red Cross and other war work 
is over, should we not divert our energies into 
some other channel, instead of lapsing into the 
rather selfish, purposeless existence that was 
typical of so many women before the war? 
Surely we do not want to forget the great les- 
son that the dreadful struggle taught us all, i.e., 
the joy of service. 

M. L. C. 



94 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[July 



NEWS FROM THE CLASSES 



1889 

Class editor, Mrs. Frank H. Simpson, Over- 
look, College Hill, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Helena Dudley was sent to meet Mme. 
Breshovsky in Seattle upon her arrival in this 
country for her lecturing tour, and traveled 
with her for six weeks. Miss Dudley had met 
Mme. Breshkovsky in Russia some years ago 
when she was sent there by the Peace party. 

1890 

Class editor, Mrs. Edward H. Keiser, Clayton. 
Mo. 

1891 

Class editor, Miss Maria Voorhees Bedinger, 
Anchorage, Ky. 

1892 

Class editor, Mrs. Frederick M. Ives, 318 West 
75th Street, New York City. 

1893 

Class editor, Mrs. J. Esrey Johnson Jr., 8 
Oak Way, Hartsdale, N. Y. 

Joseph Esrey Johnson, Jr., husband of Mar- 
garet Hillis Johnson, while on his way to New 
York City, on April 4, was killed by an auto- 
mobile, near the New York Central Railroad 
Station in Scarsdale, New York. He leaves 
one child, a son, Joseph Esrey Johnson, 4th. 

Eliza Adams Lewis has recently been travel- 
ing in Japan. She visited Miss Ume Tsuda 
ex-'93, in Tokyo, spending some time at her 
school, and also saw Masa Dogura '97 (Vis- 
countess Uchida). Mrs. Frank Lewis will be 
glad to write to any one who would like to have 
news of former Bryn Mawr Japanese students. 
Mrs. Lewis' address is 3216 N. Pennsylvania 
Street, Indianapolis. 

1894 

Class editor, Mrs. R. N. Durfee, 19 Highland 
Avenue, Fall River, Mass. 

1895 

Class editor, Miss Mary F. Ellis, 2505 South 
Lambert Street, Philadelphia, Penna. 

1896 

Class editor, Miss Mary W. Jewett, Moravia, 

N. Y. 



Elizabeth Kirkbridge was elected president of 
the Philadelphia College Club at the annual 
elections held in May. The other officers rep- 
resent other colleges. 

1897 

Class editor, Miss Mary M. Campbell, Walker 
Road, West Orange, N. J. 

Anna B. Lawther has been made the associ- 
ate member for Iowa on the women's bureau of 
the National Democratic committee. Miss 
Lawther has been for some time head of the 
woman suffrage organization in Iowa. 

1898 

Class editor, Mrs. Wildred Bancroft, Slaters- 
ville, R. I. 

Dr. Martha Tracy, dean of the Women's 
Medical College of Philadelphia urged the found- 
ing of a school for women at the Convention of 
the Women's National Medical Association, 
held at Atlantic City on June 10. 

Evelyn Hunt died in Florence, Italy, Novem- 
ber, 1918. 

Marion Park has been elected Dean of Sim- 
mons College. 

Sophie Olsen Bertelsen (Mrs. Henrik Bertel- 
sen) with her son, Hans has returned from Den- 
mark for a short visit with her parents. 

Helen Sharpless, acting librarian of Haver- 
ford College will take a year's vacation in 1919— 
20. 

Sarah Ridgway Bruce (Mrs. George H. Bruce) 
is living at the Hill school. Pottstown, Penna., 
where her husband teaches. 

Anne Strong is professor of Public Health 
Nursing at Simmons College, Boston. 

1899 

Class editor, Mrs. Edward H. Waring, 325 
Washington Street, Glen Ridge, N. J. 

Michi Matsuda has been appointed trustee 
of the Doshisha University, Kioto. She is the 
first Japanese woman to be apponted as trustee 
of a university. 

1900 

Class editor, Miss Mary Helen MacCoy, Social 
Service, Base Hospital, Camp Devens, Mass. 

Elsie Dean Findley (Mrs. J. D. Findley) is 
busy as usual this summer attending to the 



1919 



News from the Classes 



95 



many wants of her four children and keeping 
her home and garden flourishing as they should. 
She hopes some of 1900 will visit her at 2406 
Second Ave., Altoona, Penna. 

Cornelia Halsey Kellogg (Mrs. Frederic R. 
Kellogg), Alletta L. Korff (Baroness Serge A. 
Korff), Julia Streeter Gardner (Mrs. Henry 
Gardner) and Louise Congdon Francis (Mrs. 
Richard Francis) were at college at commence- 
ment and enjoyed '99's reunion. They formed 
a committee for their twentieth reunion next 
year. Lois Farnham Horn (Mrs. David W . 
Horn) was also at the alumnae supper. Marga- 
retta Morris Scott (Mrs. Samuel B. Scott) came 
out from Philadelphia for the luncheon at the 
Deanery on Commencement Day. 

Margaretta Morris Scott (Mrs. Samuel B. 
Scott) has taken a cottage at Bay Head, New 
Jersey, where she expects to spend the summer 
with her three daughters, joined at week ends 
by her husband, who was released from mili- 
tary service in January. She has spent the last 
year directing an investigation of Philadelphia 
conditions under the auspices of the Woman's 
League for Good Government, the results of 
which she has put into a small book "Facts 
about Philadelphia" which was published by the 
League this spring. 

Lois Farnham Horn (Mrs. David W. Horn) 
has moved with her husband and family to 616 
Montgomery Avenue, Bryn Mawr, Penna. 

Amy C. Sharpless, ex-'OO, has been working 
for the Red Cross Home Service in Bryn Mawr. 

Julia Streeter Gardner (Mrs. Henry Gardner) 
is spending the summer with her family at 
Straw's Point, Rye Beach, New Hanpshire. 

Clara Seymour St. John (Mrs. George C. St. 
John) is planning to spend the summer vacation 
with her husband and four children at their 
bungalow in the woods near Wallingford, Con- 
necticut which they have named "Patmos" as 
being the place where St. John will probably 
have revelations. 

Kate Williams, Mary Kilpatrick and Cornelia 
Halsey Kellogg all attended the national con- 
ference for social work held in Atlantic City in 
June. Mary Kilpatrick will be at Ogunquit this 
summer and Cornelia Kellogg at Fishers Island. 

Helen Titus Emerson ex-'OO has been doing 
Red Cross home service visiting in the last 
year, a little settlement club work, has been 
captain of a troop of Girl Scouts and secretary- 
treasurer for the Negro Fresh Air Committee. 



1901 

Class editor, Miss Marion Reilly, 2015 De 
Lancey Place, Philadelphia, Penna. 

1902 

Class editor, Mrs. L. D. Howe, 2400 16th 
Street, N. W., Washington, D. C. 

Notice to Class: Will the members of the class 
of 1902 notify the secretary, Anna Hampton 
Todd, 2115 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, Penna. 
whether they desire a class reunion in 1920 or 
1922.— A. H. Todd. 

1903 

Class editor, Mrs. H. K. Smith, Farmington, 
Conn. 

1904 

Class editor, Miss Emma C. Thompson, 
South 50th Street, Philadelphia, Penna. 

Myra Elliot Vauclain (Mrs. Jacques Vauclain) 
has a son, born May 23. 

1905 

Class editor, Mrs. Ellsworth Huntington, care 
of Mrs. L. J. Tyler, 34 Edgehill Road, New 
Haven, Conn. 

Alice Meigs Orr's eldest son died in August of 
infantile paralysis. The other children had it 
but have now all recovered. 

Carla Denison Swan (Mrs. Henry Swan) has 
been spending the winter in Bilexi, Miss. Her 
husband has been assistant manager of the 
Mountain Division of the Red Cross, until 
last summer when he went into Naval Aviation. 
After his training at the Great Lakes Station, 
he was ordered to Pensacola, but is now back in 
Denver. 

Louise Marshall Mallery (Mrs. Otto Tod 
Mallery), is living in Washington where her 
husband is helping with reconstruction and 
labor problems. 

Alice Meigs Orr's husband has been in France 
with "his wings," but is now at home. 

Frederica Le Fevre Bellamy (Mrs. Harry E. 
Bellamy) has been instrumental in starting a 
little theatre in Denver. She did the Press work 
and managed the Tableaux for the Governor's 
Inaugural Ball recently. Her husband has 
been working for the Red Cross and was about 
to sail from New York in November but his 
passage was cancelled and he is now in Denver. 



96 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[July 



Helen Griffith is again teaching at Mt. Holy- 
oke. She is also working for her Ph.D. thesis. 

Alice Jaynes Tyler (Mrs. Leonard S. Tyler) 
has a second daughter, born in September. 

Edith Longstreth Wood (Mrs. William S. 
Wood) and her husband spent last winter in La 
Jolle, Cal., for Mr. Wood's health. 

Helen Sturgis and Florence Waterbury are 
working in the Red Cross Canteen at Beau 
Desert, 8 miles from Bordeaux. 

Margaret Nichols Hardenbergh's home was 
destroyed by fire in January. Her new address 
is 3710 Warwick Boulevard, Kansas City, Mo. 
If anyone in 1905 has a class lantern, please 
communicate with her. The Trophy Club has 
no 1905 lantern. 

Jane Ward's mother is now living with her in 
Shanghai. 

Four 1905 members attended the Biennial 
Convention of the association of Collegiate 
Alumnae in St. Louis in March. They were: 
Alice Flickinger, Pauline Witherspoon, Madge 
McEwen Schmitz and Margaret Nichols Har- 
denbergh. 

Margaret Bates Porterfield is still teaching 
Biology in Shanghai, at St. Mary's College. Her 
husband, Willard Merritt Porterfield, Jr., is in 
charge of the Biological department at St. 
John's University. She writes of the students' 
disturbances over the giving of Kionchow to 
Japan. The university was closed three days 
until they had settled down and there was fear 
of riots against the huge Japanese population. 

Rachel Brewer Huntington's husband, Ells- 
worth Huntington has been a captain in the 
monograph subsection of the Positive Intelli - 
gence branch of the military intelligence divi- 
sion. They spent last winter in Washington. 

Hope Allen is in London doing research work 
delayed by the war. She writes, "England is 
less changed than I expected." 

Catherine Utley Hill has been on the staff of 
the St. Jean des Monts canteen of the Y. M. 
C. A. in France. In March she returned to this 
country with her sister who was invalided home 
from France. She expects to return to her 
foreign work. 

Olive G. Eddy's husband, Clinton A. Carpen- 
ter, has charge of the erection of a $45,000,000 
smokeless powder plant at Nitro, West Virginia. 

Edith E. Sharpless works among small Japan- 
ese children at Mito. She writes that a tiny 
newcomer was afraid of her because she was a 
foreigner, but he was reprimanded by a 5 year 
old who insisted that she was Japanese. 



" Patsy" Gardner has been working at the 
Cantine des Deux Drapeaux near the Chemin 
des Dames. 

Helen Jackson Paxson (Mrs. Frederic L. 
Paxson) and her family have returned to Madi- 
son, Wisconsin from war work in Washington. 

Marcia B ready has been in a Foyer du Soldat 
north of Paris. She sailed last August. 

1906 

Class editor, Mrs. Robert Walcott, 152 Brattle 
Street, Cambridge, Mass. 

Phoebe Crosby Alnut (Mrs. Severn R. Alnut) 
is teaching-principal at Carson College for 
Orphan Girls at Flourtown, Penna. 

Louise Fleischmann was married to Alfred 
Maclay in May, in New York. 

1907 

Class editor, Mrs. R. E. Apthorp, care of Dr. 
C. H. Williams, Charles River Road, Cam- 
bridge, Mass. 

Julie Benjamin Howson will be at Silver Mine, 
Conn., this summer. Her husband returned 
from France early in the spring with the 27th 
Division. 

Margaret Ayer Barnes and her family will 
divide the summer between Southboro, Mass. 
and Mattapoisett, Mass. 

Next winter Margaret Morison will teach at 
Miss Chamberlain's School in New York where 
Margaret Bailey is Head of the English Depart- 
ment. 

Among other portraits she has painted lately 
Gertrude Hill has done several of American 
aviators. 

Esther Williams Apthorp's address after 
September 15th will be 8 Carpenter St. Salem, 
Mass. and until then Harbor View, Marble- 
head, Mass. 

Annabella Richards died of pneumonia fol- 
lowing influenza on February 8. She was 
working at Johns Hopkins and died in the hos- 
pital there. This news comes as a great shock to 
the members of 1907 and to all her other friends, 
for no one who knew her can ever forget her 
utter simplicity, her lovableness, her modesty 
and her quiet strength of character. 

Dorothy Forster Miller (Mrs. Rutger B. 
Miller) has a third child, a daughter, Susan 
Gardner, born in December. For some weeks 
Mrs. Miller has been with her mother in Milton, 
Mass. 



1919] 



News from the Classes 



97 



Margaret Ayer Barnes (Mrs. Cecil Barnes) 
has a third son, Benjamin Ayer, born in Wash- 
ington on February 13. Next winter Mrs. 
Barnes expects to be back in Chicago as her hus- 
band will have finished his work with the United 
States Food Administration. 

Anne Vauclain is in France doing relief work. 

Harriot Houghteling has been at Ormond 
Beach, Fla., recuperating from the very severe 
attack of influenza which prevented her from 
going to France to do Y. M. C. A. work as she 
had planned to do last fall. 

Esther Williams Apthorp (Mrs. Robert E. 
Apthorp) has returned to Cambridge after four 
months in Anniston Ala. 

1908 

Class editor, Mrs. Dudley Montgomery, 115 
Langdon Street, Madison, Wis. 

Margaret S. Duncan, who has been instructor 
in French and Spanish this year at Bryn Mawr, 
has announced her engagement to Dr. George 
F. Miller of Buckhamon, West Virginia, and 
expects to be married in August. 

Miriam Ristine has gone to France to work 
for the Y. W. C. A. 

Virginia McKenney Claiborne (Mrs. Robert 
Claiborne) has a son, born in England on May 
30. 

Emily Dungan Moore (Mrs. George W. 
Moore) has moved from Woodbury, New Jersey, 
to 316 Cynwyd Road, Cynwyd, Penna. 

1909 

Class editor, Miss Atta C. Stevens, 4700 
Kenwood Avenue, Chicago, 111, 

1910 

Class editor, Mrs. H. B, Van Dyne, Troy, 
Penna. 

Susanne C. Emery (Mrs. Henry C. Emery) 
is now living at 1 East 56th St., New York City. 
Mr. Emery arrived in New York on the day the 
armistice was signed. 

Ruth Collins Desch (Mrs. Frank Desch) is 
teaching English in the Brooklyn Heights Sem- 
inary. 

Mary Doheny Dougherty (Mrs. E. J. Dough- 
erty) was married last June to Edward J. 
Dougherty a civil engineer. Her address is now 
513 N. Fifty-Second St., Phila., Penna. 

Madeleine Edison Sloane (Mrs. John E. 
Sloane) is at Fort Myer, Florida. 



Katherine Evans is in France with the French 
Army. 

Zip Falk Szold (Mrs. Robert Szold) has a 
small daughter, Miriam. Mr. Szold is in Pales- 
tine in the interests of Zionism. 

Ruth George is at Corona Ranch, San Ja- 
cinto, Cal., with her sister who is ill. 

Hildegarde Hardenbergh Eagle (Mrs. Henry 
Eagle) has a small son, Henry, Jr. 

Frances Hearne Brown (Mrs. Robert B. 
Brown) has a small son Robert Brown, Jr., a 
year old in March. 

Miriam Hedges Smith (Mrs. Alexander 
Smith) is in Ambala, India, where her husband 
is in the British Army. 

Janet Howell Clark (Mrs. Admont H. Clark) 
is teaching at Johns Hopkins in the School of 
Hygiene. Mr Clark died last fall from influ- 
enza-pneumonia . 

Mary Agnes Irvine is in France doing Y. M. 
C. A. work. 

Agnes M. Irwin is in Paris doing canteen 
work in the Y. M. C. A. 

Annie Jones Rosborough (Mrs. John Rosbor- 
ough) was married last October in Lincoln, 
Nebr. Mr. Rosborough is instructor of theory, 
harmony, analysis and counterpoint in the 
school of music and teacher of harmony and 
history of music in the University of Nebraska. 

Katherine Kelley Taylor (Mrs. W. N. Taylor) 
has two children, — Katherine, two years old 
and William Kelley, born January 29. 

Jeanne Kerr Fleischmann (Mrs. Udo M. 
Fleischmann) has been for a year Secretary of 
the New York Branch of the American Fund 
for French Wounded. 

Gertrude Kingsbacher Sunstein (Mrs. Elias 
Sunstein) has a third baby and second son born 
last July. 

Marion Kirk has been teaching Latin and 
German at the Agnes Irwin School, Philadel- 
phia. 

Frances Lord Robins (Mrs. Sidney Robins) 
has a daughter, Anne, born January 7. 

Millicent Pond has for the past year had 
charge of a laboratory of a powder company 
which was filling war orders. 

Evelyn Seely Jackson (Mrs. Lambert Jack- 
son) has a son, Alan, born last June. 

Henrietta Sharp has been teaching Latin in 
the Walnut Lane School, in Germantown. 

Margaret Shearer Smith (Mrs. Jewell Kellogg 
Smith) has a daughter Joan Kellogg, Mr. 
Smith is a brother of Hilda W. Smith, '10. 



98 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[July 



Mary Boyd Shipley is sailing for home this 
month. She expects to be married in Septem- 
ber to Mr. Samuel John Mills who is a member 
of the Presbyterian Mission and is working for 
Chinese Student Volunteer Movement. 

Hilda W. Smith is to take Helen Taft's place 
as Dean of the College at Bryn Mawr next 
winter. 

Catherine Souther Buttrick (Mrs. Winthrop 
Buttrick) has a small son aged seven months. 

Florence Wilbur Wyckoff (Mrs. Lewis B. 
Wyckoff) has a small daughter, Eleanor Wilbur, 
born December 9. 

Marion Wildman McLaughlin (Mrs. Perry 
McLaughlin) has a daughter Sarah Elizabeth, 
who was two years old in April. Dr. McLaugh- 
lin is now in Cologne with the British Army of 
Occupation. 

1911 

Class editor, Miss Margaret J. Hobart, The 
Churchman, 381 Fourth Avenue, New York 
City. 

Agnes Murray was the Red Cross delegate 
from Colorado and New Mexico at the Interna- 
tional Conference on the Rehabilitation of 
Wounded Soldiers, held last week in New York. 

Margaret Doolittle has gone to Syria where 
she will be assistant principal at the American 
Mission school for Girls in Beirut. Miss Doo- 
little has been teaching at the Kennedy School of 
Missions in Hartford for the last few 'years. 

Marion Crane Carroll (Mrs. Charles A. Car- 
roll) has left New York to live in Utica. Her 
husband who has been in the work of embarka- 
tion of soldiers in New York, has been trans- 
ferred to France to help in the return of soldiers 
to this country. 

Ethel Richardson is working on the Com- 
mission of Housing and Immigration of Cali- 
fornia and is also director of the Bureau of 
Education. 

Elizabeth Taylor (Mrs. John Francis Russell), 
'11, has a second daughter, Janet, born on Janu- 
ary 2. 

1912 

Class editor, Mrs. J. H. MacDonald, 3227 
North Pennsylvania Street, Indianapolis, Ind. 

Helen Barber Matteson (Mrs. Paul Matte- 
son) has a daughter, Ellen born May 4 in Cam- 
bridge, Mass. 

Carmelita Chase Hinton (Mrs. Sebastian 
Hinton) has a son, William Howard born Febru- 
ary 2. 



Margaret Thackery Weems (Mrs. Phillip 
Weems) has a daughter born in March. 

Agnes Morrow and Mary Brown have re- 
turned from France. 

Margaret Peck has announced her engage- 
ment to Lieutenant Thomas S. MacEwan. 

Gertrude Llewellyn is assistant in the patho- 
logical laboratory in the Evanston hospital, 
Evanston, 111. 

Margaret T. Corwin has been made executive 
secretary of the women of the Graduate School 
of Yale. There has never been a dean of women 
in this school and although the title has not been 
conferred on Miss Corwin, her work will be of 
the type of a dean of women. Miss Corwin 
spent the summer in Beaune, France as a Y. M. 
C. A. canteen worker. Previous to that she 
was executive secretary of the Connecticut 
Woman's Division of the National Council of 
Defence in Hartford. Before that she was 
connected with the Yale University Press. 

1913 

Class editor, Nathalie Swift, 156 East 79th 
street, New York City. 

Mary Tongue and Dorothea Baldwin have 
returned from France where they have been 
working with the American Red Cross. Doro- 
thea Baldwin told some of her experiences at 
the annual dinner of the New York Bryn Mawr 
Club. 

Cecile Goldsmith Lewisohn (Mrs. Julian Lew- 
isohn) has a second child, a son, born Dec. 10, 
1918. 

Lucile Shadborn Yow (Mrs. Jones Du Bignon 
Yow) has a son born in January. 

Agathe Deming is running a girls' camp on 
Upper Chateaugay in the Adirondacks. 

Elizabeth Fabian Webster (Mrs. Ronald 
Webster) is living at 905 Greenwood boulevard, 
Evanston, Illinois. 

Elizabeth Shipley, ex-' 13, is working with the 
White-Williams Foundation for Girls in Phila- 
delphia, doing vocational and educational 
guidance work. 

Margaret Blaine has finished her war work in 
Washington, and returned to Taunton, Massa- 
chusetts in April. 

Frances Livingston is executive secretary of 
the American Ambulance hospital in Paris. 

Carolyn Bulley, ex-' 13, was married on May 
27 to Mr. Jack Cox at her home in Syracuse, 
N. Y. Mr. Cox is a surveyor for the Canadian 
government, and they will make their home in 



1919] 



News from the Classes 



99 



Ottawa. Carolyn Bulley returned in May from 
France where she was in charge of one of the 
moving picture concerns for the entertainment 
of the soldiers in France and in the occupied 
territory in Germany. 

1914 

Class editor, Miss Ida Pritchett, School of 
Hygiene and Public Health, Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity, Baltimore, Md. 

Elizabeth Colt was married in Geneseoon 
May 10 to Dr. Howard F. Shattuck. They live 
at 151 East 81st Street, New York. 

Isabel Benedict is an assistant to the Director 
of the Institute of International Education in 
New York. 

Laura Delano (Mrs. James L. Houghteling, 
Jr.) is traveling in California. 

Agnes Patton Wilder, ex-' 14 (Mrs. Lawrence 
Wilder), adopted a little girl about four years 
ago. She has just adopted two more children, 
a boy and a girl. 

Elizabeth Swan, ex-' 14, is living in Denver. 
She has just adopted a little boy two years old. 

Mary Shipley Allinson, ex-' 14, (Mrs. Page 
Allinson) is living in Westchester, Penna., 
where she expects to establish a school in the 
fall, as the educational facilities are very poor. 

Mollie Buchanan, ex-' 14, received her A.B. 
degree at the University of Pennsylvania in 
1918. 

Dorothy Cox, ex-' 14 has been doing hospital 
work in France, and is still there. 

Irene Paddock, ex-' 14 is teaching Latin and 
Mathematics at the Agnes Irwin School, Phila- 
delphia. 

Edwina Warren went abroad for the Red 
Cross last fall. Shortly after landing she had 
spinal meningitis, but has entirely recovered. 

Catherine Westling is assistant librarian at 
Haverford College. 

Dorothy Weston has been doing settlement 
work ever since 1914. This spring she broke 
down and had to give up all work for two 
months. She may have to continue in something 
not quite so strenuous. 

Katharine Sergeant Angell (Mrs. Ernest 
Angell) has been living in Boston this winter 
with her daughter Nancy, who is the class 
baby. She was unable to return to Reunion 
because her sister, who was accidentally wounded 
in France last year by an exploding hand gren- 
ade, had just come home. 



Alice Miller Chester (Mrs. William Chester) 
has been abroad since 1917 working in Paris. 
She reached New York on May 31, and was 
able to come to Bryn Mawr on June 3 for part 
of Reunion. 

Elizabeth Ayer returned on the same boat 
with Alice Miller Chester, and came to Bryn 
Mawr the same day to be present at Class 
Supper. 

Ella Oppenheimer and Martha Elliot (ex-' 14) 
are at the Peter Bent Brigham Hospital in Bos- 
ton. They are the only women doctors ever 
admitted there. 

Sophie Forster is a clerk in the Military Intel- 
ligence Department, Washington. 

Margaret McElree is teaching in the High 
School at Swarthmore, Pa. 

Rena Bixler has been doing relief work in 
Paris under Alice Channing, '11. She re- 
turned on May 31. 

Jessie Boyd has been working this winter with 
the War Trade Board, in New York. 

Christine Brown has been in France since 
October doing Red Cross canteen work. She 
expects to sail for home as soon as she can get 
passage. 

Eleanor Allen is recreation director at the 
''Emporium," the largest department store in 
San Francisco. 

Leah Cadbury returned from France in May. 

There were 35 members of the class at Class 
Supper on May 31, and five or six others were 
at college later in the week. 

Dorothy Hughes has been married to Lieut. - 
Col. Frederick W. Herman, U. S. Army Engineer 
Corps, stationed at Washington, D. C. 

Elizabeth S. Bryant has been taking a 13 
months' training course in Psychiatric Social 
work at the Psychopathic Hospital, Boston, 
Massashusetts in conjunction with the Smith 
Summer School. 

1915 

Class editor, Miss Katherine W. McCollin, 
2213 St. James Place, Philadelphia, Penna. 

Laura Branson has gone to Texas to visit her 
sister for the summer. She will return to the 
Shipley School next autumn to teach Mathe- 
matics. 

Anna Brown has been working as a secretary 
for the Red Cross this winter. She expects to 
manage the Brown farm in Delaware this sum- 
mer. 

Julia Deming has just finished her first year's 
work at the Women's Medical College. 



100 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[July 



Margaret Free has been chairman of the 
committee to raise funds for the French Victory 
Chair in Pittsburgh. 

Ruth Glenn Pennell (Mrs. Edred J. Pennell) 
has moved to Bryn Mawr, where she and Mr. 
Pennell have taken an apartment over the Post 
Office. Mr. Pennell is practising law in Mont- 
gomery county. 

Mary Goodhue is doing Y. M. C. A. work in 
Baltimore. 

Ruth Hubbard was doing work as a censor of 
Spanish letters during the war. The letters 
which she censored were chiefly American letters 
to South America. 

Adrienne Kenyon Franklin (Mrs. Benjamin 
Franklin, Jr.) has moved to 7008 Greene Street, 
Germantown, Philadelphia. 

Amy Martin will be Resident Fellow in Eco- 
nomics and Politics at Bryn Mawr next winter. 

Katherine McCollin will teach History and 
Science in the lower school of the Agnes Irwin 
School next winter. 

Dorothea May Moore has just finished her 
first year of work as a medical student at Johns 
Hopkins University. 

Cecilia Sargent expects to go to Mexico as a 
teaching missionary in the fall. 

Isabel Smith has a Graduate Scholarship in 
Geology at Bryn Mawr. 

Gladys Pray has announced her engagement to 
Howard Ketcham of Passaic, New Jersey. Mr. 
Ketcham is a graduate of Stephens College 1912. 

Marjorie Tyson was married to Howard For- 
man on April 3. Mr. and Mrs. Forman are liv- 
ing at Kitchewan, N. Y. 

Helen Everett has been working for the Amer- 
ican Association for Labor Legislation. Next 
fall she will teach Economics at Vassar. 

Alice Humphreys is doing Psychiatric work for 
the New York hospitals of the American Red 
Cross. 

Elizabeth Smith is the District Supervisor of 
the Home Service Section of the Cincinnati 
Red Cross. 

Enid Dessau is in France as secretary to 
Mrs. Lathrop, head of the American Fund for 
French Wounded. 

Ruth Hopkinson is a service clerk in the 
Joseph & Feiss Company, in Cleveland. 

Candace Hewitt, ex-'15, is in Constantinople 
working for the Armenian, Syrian and Near 
East Relief. 

Isolde T. Zeckwer received the degree of 
M.D. from the Woman's Medical College of 
Pennsylvania on June 18. 



1916 

Class editor, Mrs. Webb I. Vorys, 1640 East 
Broad Street, Columbus, Ohio. 

Dorothy Belleville, ex-'16, has announced 
her engagement to Harry K. Hill. Mr. Hill is 
an apiarist and has three bee farms in Willows, 
Cal. 

Mildred McCay has announced her engage- 
ment to Lieut. Commander Leslie Lafayette 
Jordan, U. S. N. 

Lois Goodnow MacMurray (Mrs. John Mac- 
Murray) ex-' 16 has returned from China and 
Japan with her husband and children. Her 
youngest son was born September 29 in Tokyo. 

Frederika Kellogg Jouett (Mrs. John H. 
Jouett) christened the Waterbury of New York 
at the Downing Shipyards on Staten Island, 
July 23. The ship was named for Mrs. Jouett's 
home city because of the fine record it made in 
the fourth Liberty Loan drive. The honor of 
christening fell to Mrs. Jouett as a Waterbury 
girl who had seen service in France. 

Catherine Crowell is an analyst at the Atlas 
Powder Works. During the war she was in 
charge of the company's laboratory which ran 
controls for the ammonia nitrate plant and 
taught the workers analysis. The work ran in 
seven-hour shifts, and every two weeks, when 
the shifts changed she was on duty thirty-six 
hours. 

Dorothy Deneen Blow (Mrs. Allmand Blow) 
has a daughter, born May 2. 

Lilla Worthington has announced her en- 
gagement to James Kirkland of Montgomery, 
Alabama. Mr. Kirkland is a graduate of the 
University of Alabama and an Oxford Rhodes 
Scholar. 

Helen S. Chase was married in May to Rufus 
Rand, Jr., of Minneapolis. Mr. Rand is '17 
Williams He is an ace in the Lafayette Esca- 
drille and has received the croix de guerre with 
palm and two citations. Miss Chase met Mr. 
Rand when she was serving as a nurse in Dr. 
Blake's Military Hospital in Paris. 

Eva Bryne will teach at the Bryn Mawr School 
in Baltimore this winter. 

Alene Burt is a member of the advertising 
department of the Pictorial Review. 

Constance Dowd is spending the summer at 
the Belgrade Lakes, Maine, as a councillor at 
a camp for girls. 

Margaret Russell Kellen (Mrs. Roger S. 
Kellen) has moved from Portland, Maine to 
Boston. 



1919] 



News from the Classes 



101 



Lucretia Garfield is doing girl scout work this 
summer in Plymouth, Massachusetts. 

Eugenia Donchian received her A.M. in Ro- 
mance Languages at Columbia University this 
June. 

Helen Riegal Oliver (Mrs. Howard T. Oliver) 
is living in Mexico City. 

Buckner Kirk is doing canteen work in France. 

Elizabeth Washburn is doing reconstruction 
work in France. 

Anna Lee taught English at the Frankfort 
High School, Frankfort, Penna., last winter. 

Katherine Scriven, ex-' 16, is working at a 
canteen in Nantes, France. 

1917 

Class editor, Miss Constance Hall, 1755 N 
Street, Washington, D. C. 

Mary Andrews was married to William Pitt 
Mason, Jr. in St. Paul's Church, Englewood, New 
Jersey, April 24. Mildred Peacock, ex-' 19, was 
maid of honor. 

Virginia Litchfield is a reconstruction aide in 
France. 

Margaret Thompson has been working in her 
father's office on railroad statistics. 

1918 

Class editor, Miss Margaret C. Timson, 
Woodmere, Long Island, N. Y. 

Evelyn Babbitt is working in the office of the 
Returned Soldiers' Employment Bureau at the 
Hudson Terminal. She interviews soldiers and 
finds them employment. 

Marjorie Strauss is in Paris where her father 
is representing the United States Treasury De- 
partment on one of the advisory committees of 
the Peace Conference. 

Helen Wilson has been teaching French, both 
private lessons and in school and also doing 
volunteer visiting for the Red Cross civilian 
relief in which she intends to take further 
training. 

Frances Buffum is nursing men returned from 
overseas at Camp Devens. After taking the 
Vassar nursing course last summer, Miss Buffum 
was in New York, then in the spring was called 
to Camp Dix. 

Jeanette Ridlon is a laboratory assistant in 
chemistry at the University of Chicago. 

Dorothy Harris, ex-'18, took her A.B. at 
Barnard this June. 

Irene Loeb coached a play given by the chil- 
dren of Bryn Mawr alumnae in St. Louis for the 
benefit of the Victory Chair in French. The 
sum of $62.62 was realized. 



Helen Alexander, ex-' 18, is doing canteen 
work at Brest, France. 

Mary Allen, ex-' 18 took a three months 
training course at Lane Hospital, San Francisco, 
and is now attending the summer session of the 
University of California, where she is majoring 
in Pathology. 

Eleanor Atherton is doing Y. M. C. A. and 
hospital work at Camp Dix. 

Martha Bailey is doing canteen work at Camp 
Merritt. 

Therese Born took her M.A. degree at Bryn 
Mawr this spring. 

Helen Butterfield was married to Captain 
Williams of the 77th Division during the last 
week in May. She and her husband have taken 
an apartment in Waverly Place, New York. 

Molly Cordingley, ex-' 18, is a reconstruction 
aide in Occupational Therapy under the Red 
Cross at the Chelsea U. S. Naval Hospital. 

Beulah Fegley is secretary to the Eastern 
Sales Manager of the Art Publication Society 
of St. Louis. 

Mary Gardiner went to England with her 
father in April. 

Helen Hammer (Mrs. Stuart Link), ex-' 18, 
is living in Roland Park, Md., where her hus- 
band is teaching at the Gilman Country School. 

Ruth Hart is in charge of a department of a 
New York publishing house. 

Laura Heisler, ex-' 18, is graduating in June 
from the University of Pennsylvania. 

Judith Hemenway took an M.A. degree in 
French at Bryn Mawr this spring. 

Henrietta Huff is operating a comptometer in 
an automobile factory at Williamsport. 

Irene Loeb is secretary to Edna Fischel Gel- 
horn, '00, chairman of the Missouri Equal Suf- 
frage League. 

Eugenia Lynch is working in the Actuarial 
Department of the Penn Mutual Life Insurance 
Company. 

Margaret Mall is spending the summer at a 
camp at Squam Lake, N. H. She expects to 
enter the third year of architecture at Massa- 
chusetts Tech in the fall. 

Cora Neely took her M. A. degree in Latin 
at Bryn Mawr in June 

Alice Newlin has been doing secretarial work 
at college in connection with the Victory Chair 
of French. 

Rebecca Rhoads has been teaching English in 
Jacksonville, Fla. 

Ruth Rhoads is a visitor for the Day Nursery 
of Germantown, Penna. 



102 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[July 



Helen Schwarz taught Latin at Rosemary 
Hall, Greenwich, during the winter. 

Adelaide Shaffer is working in the rehabilita- 
tion hospital at Cape May, N. J. 

Marion Smith took her M.A. degree in Greek 
at Bryn Mawr this spring. 

Mary Stair has been doing social service work 
in York, Penna. 

Marjorie Strauss is studying chemistry in 
Paris. 

Helen Whitcomb is an assistant in the Statis- 
tical Department, Savings Division, War Loan 
Organization of New England. 

Margaret Worch is working as a stenographer 
in San Francisco, where she expects to stay 
until Christmas. 



1919 

Frances Branson Keller (Mrs. Daniel Keller), 
ex-' 19, has a daughter, Frances, born April 3. 

Rosalind Gatling, ex-' 19, was married this 
spring to Ensign Favin Hawn. She met Mr. 
Hawn during her service as a yeowoman. 

Gertrude Broadhead, ex-'19, has been taking 
a course at the Pierce Business School in Phila- 
delphia. 

Elizabeth Biddle has been working at the 
Sleighton Farm School for Girls this summer 

Adelaide Landon has been assisting the dis- 
trict nurse in Staatsburg, New York this sum- 
mer. 



BRYN MAWR AUTHORS AND THEIR BOOKS 



King of the Air, a volume of poems and prose 
sketches by Elizabeth Chandlee Forman (Mrs. 
Horace B. Forman, Jr.) '02 has recently ap- 
peared in the world of books. Many of the 
sketches were written for courses in English 
composition given by Professor Lucy M. Don- 
nelly at Bryn Mawr. 

The book has met with much favorable com- 
ment, among the most interesting being the fol- 
lowing review by William Stanley Braithwaite 
of Cambridge, Mass., maker of anthologies, 
writer of verse and literary critic. The review 
is reprinted from The Boston Evening Tran- 
script. 

King of the Firmament 

Not long ago in these columns, in commenting 
upon a little volume of poems, Candles that 
Burn, by Aline Kilmer, I pointed out how this 
widow of a soldier-poet who gave his life in 
France for the ideals which led his country into 
the war, stood in her art for the spiritually heroic 
American wife, enduring with great nobility her 
great sacrifice, suffering without complaint, and 
yet giving full expression to her personal loss 
which was none the less poignant because it was 
a privilege and honor to have shared in such a 
last full measure of devotion to her country's 
cause. As Mrs. Kilmer, in the ideal attitude of 
the poet, stood for the figure of the American 
wife, so now I find in this book Mrs. Forman in 
the attitude of the poet, standing as the figure 
of the American mother, with all the glory of 
noble and uncomplaining sacrifice in laying her 
gift upon the altar of her country's need. The 



poems in King of the Air are for more than a 
good half a voice speaking the thoughts and 
giving the expression of the emotions of the 
American mothers on the war, and who have 
gone to the war in the deep love and sacrifice 
that followed the sons overseas. Simple and 
direct, but with a fervor giving them something 
so warm with human passion that they have a 
quality no art alone can give, these songs reveal 
the soul of American motherhood in a great, not 
merely national, but world, crisis. Mrs. For- 
man's son, Lieutenant Horace B. Forman, 3d, 
died in France on the 14th of September, 1918, 
and a poem, "The Blue Star and the Gold," is 
written to his memory. In a note accompany- 
ing this poem it is well to observe the subtle dis- 
tinction she makes in the dedication which reads, 
" In loving recognition of our son ... of 
the U S. Aviation Service, A. E. F., who for a 
year and a half served as a volunteer with the 
French and American Armies abroad. He died 
in France the 14th day of September, 1918, 
aged twenty-four years. In the words of his 
former French captain (Captain Robert, Centre 
d'Instruction des Eleves Aspirant, Issoudun): 
'II est tombe en brave au champ d'honneur, 
pour la France.' " The poem is also a tribute to 
the unofficial recognition of American volunteers 
in the Allied cause: 

He did not linger and wait 

For his country to see the right ! 
He went as a volunteer to France 

When we said it wasn't our fight. 
And into the great war-game, 

Not counting nor heeding the cost, 



1919] 



Bryn Mawr Authors and Their Books 



103 



He threw the strength of his splendid youth; 
He played with death — and lost! 

The blue star high in our window 

Is stained and old and dim; 
We'll make it dazzling bright today 

With gold to honor him. 
The years may dull the symbol 

Our eager hands have made — 
But the star of love on the flag of our hearts 

Is gold that cannot fade. 

The poem after which this volume takes its 
title, King of the Air, dedicated to the poet's 
son, is a tribute to all aviators. An excellent 
piece of work, it has in its closing lines the high- 
est imaginative symbol I have yet seen applied 
to these daring and intrepid warriors. I quote 
the first and the last two stanzas: 



Many of the poems of the great war deal 
touchingly with great events and figures that 
are historic and the poet has given them the 
loveliness of music and rhyme. They are played 
upon the keyboard of her imagination with a 
fine execution for the picturesque and human 
quality that is in them. They steal now and 
then through that subjective key with exquisitely 
modulated appeal as in the Song: Soft Wind, 
Sweet Wind which I quote: 

Soft wind, sweet wind, with the scent of red 
wild rose, 
Blowing swift across the heather, friend to 
welcome me — 
See ! my hands are empty of the blossoms bright 
I used to toss. 
And my heart is not for playing by the singing 



Up and away, from behind those headlands 
green, 

He sails his ship in the sky! 
Steady and keen and true, with majestic mien 

He sweeps through reaches high. 
Now he floats on wide, still wings, now dips, 

And drops like a falling star, 
Only to soar again to the highest tips 

Of mountain peaks afar. 



The winds are his trumpeters, sounding over the 
seas 
Their clarions loud and clear. 
At his crossing, the great waves chant wild 
harmonies 
For his listening soul to hear. 
He shames the birds of the land in daring and 
grace, 
And the swift- winged gulls of the sea. 
In splendid heights he rides with the sun face 
to face. 
A strong, bold king is he! 

King of the air? — Nay, king of the world is he ! 

Unbound by the narrow land 
He swings through broad, free spaces. The 
tyrannous sea 
Holds not with her iron hand. 
And his joy is greater than anything under the 
skies 
Felt since life began — 
For he joins to the passionate heart of the bird 
that flies 
The thinking soul of a man. 



Soft wind, sweet wind, there's another field I 
know, 
Where the flowers are crushed, and there are 
sad, dread things to see. . 
When another summer sun flushes all the moor 
with bloom, 
Blow my soldier safely home across the sing- 
ing sea. 

The miscellaneous poems are interesting with 
a 'touch of wistful tenderness. Nature is 
sketched in several delightful descriptive pieces 
and impressions; there are poems of personal af- 
fection and memories that bring out those eter- 
nal preoccupations of the human heart with the 
tides of life. The volume contains in its last 
pages a group of prose tales or sketches mostly of 
a symbolical nature, written in an exquisite 
style, which show that Mrs. Forman has a very 
decided gift in two mediums of creative expres- 
sion.— W. S. B. 

ANSWERS CRITICISMS 

Hannah Teresa Rowley, '01, replies to the 
criticisms of Principles of Chemistry Applied 
to the Household which she wrote in collabora- 
tion with Helen W. Farrell. 

"I wish to express to Mary Mitchell Moore 
my appreciation of her review in the April 
Quarterly of 'Principles of Chemistry Applied 
to the Household.' As the author responsible for 
the work on foods, I should like also to reply to 
her criticism of two statements made in the 
chapter on proteins. 

"First as to the absorption of the products of 



104 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[July 



protein digestion. It must be acknowledged, I 
believe, that the question is not yet fully settled. 
I have stated in my test that the amino acids are 
formed by intestinal digestion from proteoses 
and peptones, and are absorbed. But as Pro- 
fessor Sherman says in his 'Chemistry of Food 
and Nutrition/ 'Different views are held as to 
how far the splitting of protein actually goes in 
normal digestion. Some believe that it is en- 
tirely split to amino acids. Abderhalden, one of 
the most active investigators in this field, holds 
that while a large amount of amino acid is 
formed in normal digestion, there always re- 
mains and is absorbed a polypeptid molecule 
which serves as a starting point for the rebuild- 
ing of proteins in the body.' 

"Again, I must maintain that the effect of 
high temperatures on protein food is undoubt- 
edly not conducive to its digestibility. Eggs 
hard boiled are less digestible than when taken 
raw. It is true that the effect of rennin in the 
gastric juice is to curdle the casein of foods, and 
this is noted in the text as an exception to the 
general rule that the effect of digestion is to 
make the food more soluble. But casein is 
only one of many proteins, and it is not certain 
that this curdling is a phenomenon common in 
the digestion of them all. To quote Abder- 
halden, 'Coagulation occurs as a secondary effect 
in the general decomposition of casein. It is 
caused by the precipitation of the early cleavage 
products. It is possible that this stage of de- 
composition, which probably takes place before 
the formation of peptones is common to all pro- 
teins. On the other hand, it is also possible 
that casein occupies a unique position, and that 
perhaps, corresponding to its functions, it rep- 
resents a particularly complicated protein.'* 

"It is undoubtedly the responsibility of the 
authors of elementary text-books to square 
their statements with the work of investigators. 
But their main object should be to summarize 
the results of investigation in such a way that 
the outstanding facts, with their bearing on 
practical experience, shall be plain to the very 
immature minds of their pupils. This, I be- 
lieve, is accomplished when the statement is 
made that cooking is desirable for starchy foods, 
and not desirable at high temperatures for fats 
and proteins. It seems to me that this is a 
case where the main practical applications of 



* Text-Book of Physiological Chemistry, Ab- 
derhalden — Translated by Hall and Defreu, 
p. 206. 



chemistry to things of common experience 
should not be sacrificed to details of particular 
cases which serve only to confuse the beginner." 
Hannah Teresa Rowley. 

COMING HOME TO AMERICA 

Helen Davenport Gibbons, ex-'06, author of 
A Little Gray Home in France and The Red Rugs 
of Tarsus writes from Paris: 

"My husband and I are going to bring the 
children to America this summer, sailing in 
August. My husband was asked to lecture at 
Chautauqua, N. Y., in July and August but we 
should have to sail pretty soon to do it and this 
is no time for people in the writing game to 
leave Paris. We went to Saint-Germain-en- 
Laye yesterday and had a look at the Austrian 
Peace Delegates. The Sunday before we 
lunched at the Reservoirs at Versailles where 
the German Delegates are staying. I am soon 
going to Belgium and Switzerland on newspaper 
trips. 

"I wonder what America will look like to us 
two exiles! Next week we shall have our 
eleventh wedding anniversary, — we have had 
only flying visits to America since we sailed in 
June 1908 on our wedding trip." 

PLAY PRODUCED AT BARNARD 

Constance Wilson, '17, has had her play The 
Green and Blue Mat of Abdul Hassan produced 
by the Barnard Dramatic Club, Wigs and Cues. 
This play was originally published in The Bryn 
Mawr Lantern, 

"ALLISON MAKES HAY" 

Under the title of Allison Makes Hay, the 
three act comedy by Theresa Helburn, '08, which 
was produced at the Belmont Theater in New 
York last September as Crops and Croppers is 
being published by Walter H. Baker and Com- 
pany of Boston. 

BOOK OF ESSAYS 

Anne C. E Allinson (Mrs. Francis G. Allin- 
son) is collecting a group of essays for publica- 
tion in book form. 

IN THE PERIODICALS 

Rhys Carpenter, professor of Classical Arch- 
eology at Bryn Mawr has a poem, entitled "A 



1919] 



Bryn Mawr Authors and Their Books 



105 



Marching Song for England in the East" in the 
June Scribners. 

Samuel C. Chew, associate professor of 
English Literature at Bryn Mawr had an article, 
"Swinburne after Ten Years" in an April issue 
of The Nation. 

Gertrude Taylor Slaughter, '93, has an article 
entitled "Italian Sentiment" in the July Atlan- 
tic Monthly. The article is written from the 
wealth of knowledge she acquired while working 
for the Red Cross in Italy during the last two 
years. Mrs Slaughter finds the Italians very 
divided among themselves as to Fiume and the 
Adriatic. Her story will be of added interest 
to all who know her. 



A Pair of Letters 

A particularly delighful correspondence in the 
form of essays appeared in the North American 
Review this winter. In the October number 
there is an article entitled "To A Friend in 
Rome" by Anne C. E. Allinson which is ad- 
dressed to Gertrude Taylor Slaughter. The 
letter reviews the past and gives hope for the 
future. It is written in Mrs. Allinson's rich and 
beautifyl style and very much worth looking up 
in the library files. 

The answer was published in the March num- 
ber of the same review. Mrs. Slaughter tells 
not only of her work but of the approaching 
peace problems from the point of view of Italy. 



The Shipley School 

Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania 



Preparatory to Bryn Mawr College 



Alice G. Howland, 
Eleanor 0. Brownell, 

Principals. 

LAKEWOOD HALL 

LAKEWOOD, N. J. 

A College Preparatory School for 

Girls. Carefully planned 

General Courses 

Principal 
Lisa B. Converse, 

A.B. Bryn Mawr College 

THE MISSES KIRK'S 

College Preparatory School 

Bryn Mawr Ave. and Old Lancaster Road 

Bryn Mawr, Pa. 
Number of boarders limited. Com- 
bines advantages of school life with 
private instruction. Individual schedule 
arranged for each pupil. 

All teachers thoroughly familiar with 
college preparatory work. Frequent 
examinations by Bryn Mawr College 
professors. 
Gymnastics and outdoor games. 



The Baldwin School 



A Country School 
for Girls 



Bryn Mawr 
Pennsylvania 
• Ten miles from Philadelphia. Fire- 
proof Stone Building. Outdoor Gym- 
nasium. Winter Basketball Field 
Outdoor and Indoor Classrooms 
Extensive Grounds. 
Preparation for Bryn Mawr, Mount Holyoke, 
Smith, Vassar and Wellesley colleges. Also 
a strong general course. Within 26 years 272 
students from this school have entered Bryn 
Mawr College. Abundant outdoor life — 
hockey, basketball, tennis, riding. 

Elizabeth Forrest Johnson, A.B., 
Head of the School 



MISS MADEIRA'S SCHOOL 
1330 19th St., N. W. Washington, D. C. 



A Resident and Day School 
for Girls 

LUCY MADEIRA WING. A.B. 

MRS. DAVID LAFOREST WING 
Head Mistress 



MISS BEARD'S SCHOOL 

Situated in one of the most healthful and 
beautiful of the New York suburbs, 
Orange, N. J. This school offers the 
advantages of country and city alike. 

College Preparatory, Special, and Grad- 
uate Courses. Gymnasium, Music 
and Art Studios. Domestic Arts. 

Write for Illustrated Catalogue 

Address 

Miss Lucie C. Beard Orange, N. J. 






The Ethel Walker School, Inc. 

SIMSBURY, CONNECTICUT 

Head of School 

ETHEL M. WALKER 

A.M. BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 



Kindly mention the Quarterly 

I 



St. Timothy's School for Girls 



CATONSVILLE. MD. 



Re-opened September, 1919 



Closes June, 1920 



Prepares for College, preferably 
Bryn Mawr 



MISS WRIGHTS SCHOOL 
FOR GIRLS 

Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Prepares for Bryn Mawr with certifi- 
cate privileges for other 
colleges 



Rosemary Hall 

Founded 1890 

No elective courses 

Prepares for college 

Preferably Bryn Mawr 

Caroline Ruutz-Rees, Ph.D.) u m*- 
Mary E. Lowndes, Litt.D. J Head M "«™'s 

GREENWICH. CONNECTICUT 



THE AGNES IRWIN SCHOOL 

201 1 DE LANCEY PLACE 
PHILADELPHIA 

Prepares for Bryn Mawr, Smith, 
Vassar and Wellesley 
Colleges 



JOSEPHINE A. NATT, Head-Mistress 
BERTHA M. LAWS. Secret ary-Treasurer 



MISS COWLES' SCHOOL FOR GIRLS 

(Highland Hall) 
Emma Milton Cowles, A.B., Head of School 

Preparatory to Bryn Mawr, Welles- 
ley, Vassar, Smith and Mount Hol- 
yoke. Certificate privilege. Also 
strong general course. Music, Art, 
and Domestic Science. Healthful 
location, 1000 feet altitude. New 
sleeping porch. Gymnasium, swim- 
ming pool. Catalogue. 

Address the Secretary 
Pennsylvania - - Hollidaysburg 



Rogers Hall School for girls 



FACES ROGERS FORT HILL PARK 



38 MINUTES FROM BOSTON 



'"PHOROUGH preparation for Bryn Mawr and other colleges. Rogers 
Hall is now represented in Bryn Mawr, Radclirle, Smith, Vassar, 
Wellesley, University of Wisconsin, and University of Chicago. Large 
grounds for outdoor sports. Experienced instructors in charge of all 
athletics. New Gymnasium and Swimming Pool. For catalogue, address 

MISS OLIVE SEWALL PARSONS, Principal LOWELL, MASS. 



Kindly mention the Quarterly 
ii 



After College WHAT? 

ATHLETICS 



The Intercollegiate Alumnae Athletic Association in 
New York City offers college graduates opportunities 
for basket-ball, gymnasium work, swimming, riding, 
tennis, etcetera. 

Membership Fee $2.00 



Register through or request information from 

Sarah E. Loth, Executive Secretary 

119 West 74th Street New York City 



^ratt*:*:**^ 




RYN MAWR 
ALUMNAE 



QUARTERLY 



Vol. XIII NOVEMBER, 1919 No. 3 



Endowment Fund Goal Doubled 

Professor George Barton: An Appreciation 

Answers to Financial Questions 

About College 



Published by the Alumnae Association 

of 
Bryn Mawr College 



THE BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE 
QUARTERLY 

Editor-in-Chief 
Isabel Foster, '15 
Bryn Mawr, Penn. 

TABLE OF CONTENTS 

College Opens for Thirty-fifth Year 106 

Drive Goal Raised to Two Millions 109 

Answers to Financial Questions 122 

Rose Sidgwick Memorial Fellowship 127 

Professor George Barton: An Appreciation 128 

Poem — Beatrice Allard. 

Biographical Sketch — Louise Pettibone Smith, 1908, Instructor in 
Biblical Literature at Wellesley College. 

George Barton in the Service of Bryn Mawr College — Arthur 
Leslie Wheeler, Professor of Latin at Bryn Mawr College. 

George Barton as a Scholar — Morris Jastrow, Jr., Professor of 
Semitic Languages at the University of Pennsylvania. 

A Selected Bibliography — Beatrice Allard. 

In Memoriam 141 

Bryn Mawr Alumnae Enter Politics 141 

Campus Notes 144 

News from the Classes 147 

Bryn Mawr Authors and their Books 154 

Contributions to the Quarterly, books for review, and subscriptions should be sent to 
the Editor-in-Chief, Isabel Foster, Taylor Hall, Bryn Mawr, Penn. Cheques should be 
drawn payable to Bertha S. Ehlers, Taylor Hall, Bryn Mawr, Penn. The Quarterly 
is published in January, April, July and November of each year. The price of subscription 
is one dollar a year, and single copies are sold for twenty-five cents each. Any failure 
to receive numbers of the Quarterly should be reported promptly to the Editor. Changes 
of address should be reported to the Editor not later than the first day of each month 
of issue. News items may be sent to the Editors. 



Copyright, iqiq, by the Alumnae Association of Bryn Mawr College 



THE BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE 
QUARTERLY 



VOLUME XIII 



NOVEMBER, 1919 



No. 3 



COLLEGE OPENS FOR THIRTY-FIFTH 
ACADEMIC YEAR 



Acting President Helen H. Taft opened the 
thirty-fifth academic year of Bryn Mawr college 
on October 1. For the first time in the history 
of the college President Thomas was not present. 

Miss Taft's address in chapel began with a 
reference to this fact. She said in part: 

"It seems very strange to me to be making 
the address at the opening of Bryn Mawr 
College this year when I have for so many years 
sat where you are sitting today and listened 
to President Thomas open college. I suppose 
it is the first time since the time when President 
Thomas became president of the college when 
she has not given the opening address. 

"This year we are happy in having the catas- 
trophe of the war behind us and in knowing 
that the outcome is what we have hoped and 
prayed for during the last five years. Though 
we are not called on for any such effort of 
strenuousness as during the war, we still have 
to face the problems which come with recon- 
struction, and we still have to face the problem 
of whether or not we are going to be dominated 
by any one class or whether we are going to fight 
to have true democracy. 

"I think that anyone who has been in 
Europe in the last year realizes that conditions 
are no more in a state of equilibrium than while 
Europe was in the throes of war. The economic 
condition, about which we heard on every side 
while travelling through Europe, is as critical, 
if not more so than during the war. The recon- 
struction of Europe can scarcely be said in a 
material sense to have begun and the problem 
of how that is to be brought about the world 
is now facing. 

"The United States is certainly more fortu- 
nate in a material sense, but we are facing the 
same problems of the classes, of class antago- 
nism and class struggle. 



Education in Post War World 

"It is for the educated people of the country 
to bring about some conception of the possibility 
of the reconciliation of the interests of the dif- 
ferent classes and it is going to be a very com- 
plicated matter and is going to take careful 
reasoning. The greatest contribution that 
educated people can make at present is to preach 
class cooperation — not class antagonism — and 
the possibility that the interests of all may be 
reconciled. 

"Here at Bryn Mawr we will try to give you 
the best and broadest training we can in four 
years of undergraduate work so that you will 
be grounded and prepared to meet the struggle. 

Affecting Bryn Mawr 

"Bryn Mawr has its own peculiar problem of 
reconstruction. The rise in the cost of every- 
thing, from the wages of the Italians who work 
on the grounds to the food which the students 
eat, has made it impossible to support the college 
on the old financial basis. Last spring the 
Directors were compelled to raise not only the 
price of board, but the price of a large number 
of the rooms in the college. It seems as if we 
are getting away from the times when girls and 
boys can get an education for themselves with 
only slight help from their families unless they 
go to the State Universities or colleges near their 
own homes. All the other women's colleges 
have had to raise their rates. This means that 
there will be one class of girls who will not be 
able to be a part of our college community and 
who will be a distinct loss to our colleges. 

"At the same time that the Directors have 
had to realize the necessity for raising the rates 
for the material things at Bryn Mawr the Faculty 
of Bryn Mawr have found themselves unable to 
live on their salaries. Up to the end of the war, 



107 



108 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly [November 



when we all felt that we were suffering together, 
when we were all of us making every possible 
effort to give all we had to the cause and were 
ready to bear any discomfort in silence, the 
difficulties of the professors were not stressed, 
but the situation last year could no longer be 
overlooked. I wonder how many of the under- 
graduates realize what it is to have as a maximum 
possible salary $3000 on which a whole family 
must in many cases live and on which the 
children must be educated. It means that it 
is absolutely impossible to continue to live in 
an adequate manner at all and educate one's 
children. 

"I am not going to stress upon the difficulties 
of the members of the Faculty — they would be 
the last to wish to be an object of pity — but you 
must recognize that no intelligent, in fact, no 
sane man or woman is going to choose a pro- 
fession which gives no opportunity or hope of 
earning a decent livelihood. And if the intel- 
lectual life of Bryn Mawr is to continue, if the 
intellectual life of any of the colleges of the 
country is to continue, either their annual rates 
must be raised many hundreds of dollars or 
their endowment must be greatly increased. 

Salaries Come First 

"This is the paramount financial question 
which is facing Bryn Mawr today, and I think 
the undergraduates will feel, as the Alumnae 
have felt, that every other object must give way 
to it. We have hoped again and again that we 
are going to be able to build our Students' 
Building. It is certainly a necessity in the lives 
of the undergraduates if they are to continue 
to have any kind of adequate dramatics. But 
I think that you will all of you appreciate and 
that you are all of you generous enough to realize 
that it is possible for you to go on with make- 
shifts a little longer and it is not possible for 
the Bryn Mawr Faculty to go on any longer 
with their present salaries. 

"In view of the fact that the cost of living 
has increased nearly 100% since the last time 
that the salaries of full professors were raised, a 
25% increase would be quite inadequate. The 
Alumnae who met in conference here last week 
recognized this fact and voted that the drive 
should be made for $2,000,000 so that Bryn 
Mawr need not start a second drive as soon as 
the first million was completed and so that an 
increase could be made so substantial that the 
professors would be able to live more or less on 
the scale — modest enough, in truth — in which 
they lived before the war. 



"The undergraduates cannot make any con- 
siderable contributions of their own to this 
campaign. President Thomas and I have both 
felt during the war that undergraduates were 
asked too often to make contributions to every 
kind of fund. We don't wish Bryn Mawr to 
have the reputation of making continual finan- 
cial demands on the undergraduate body. But 
we hope that the undergraduates will help us by 
giving their own evidence as to the need of Bryn 
Mawr at this time and by giving us the names 
of any of their friends or acquaintances who 
they think might contribute if they were 
approached." 

Tribute to Dr. Jessen 

In speaking of the death of Dr. Jessen, Miss 
Taft said that he "always worked throughout 
his term at Bryn Mawr for the maintenance of 
high standards, not only in German, but all 
through the college. He spoke again and again 
in Faculty meetings in favor of keeping up the 
standards for which Bryn Mawr had always 
stood. I hardly think the students realized it, 
but he was tremendously interested in the wel- 
fare of Bryn Mawr College. The last four years 
of his life were of course darkened by the war, 
and it is very sad to think that he died just at 
the time when there might have been a happier 
period in store for him." 

Daughters of 1893 Enter 

Of the entering class of more than a hundred, 
two members are daughters of alumnae of the 
Class of 1893. Anne Fitzgerald is the daughter 
of Susan Walker Fitzgerald, and Silvia Saunders 
the daughter of Louise Brownell Saunders. Mrs . 
Saunders was 1893's European fellow. 

Helen Schwarz '18, Frederica Howell '19, 
Lois Kellogg '20, Frances von Hofsten '20, 
Elizabeth Matteson '21, Elizabeth H. Mills '21, 
Katharine Ward '21, and Mary D. Hay '22 all 
have sisters in 1923. 

Of the four matriculation scholarships 
awarded to members of the Freshman Class, 
the scholarship for the New England States went 
to Mary Adams of Rosemary with an average 
of 83.15. Edith Melcher of the Lower Merion 
High School is scholar for Pennsylvania with 
81.3, and Virginia Miller, prepared by the 
Girton School, is scholar for the West with an 
average of 70.8. The scholarship for New York, 
New Jersey, and Delaware was won by Beatrice 
Bishop who enters from the Brearley School with 
an average of 78.7. Honorable mention was 
made of Elizabeth Vincent, Haroldine Hum- 
phries, and Harriet Price. 



1919] 



College Opens for Academic Year 



109 



Bryn Mawr alumnae returning this year as 
graduate students are Amy Martin '15, Alice 
Newlin '18, Margaret Gilman '19, Ernestine 
Mercer '19, Helen Spalding '19, Ruth Wood- 
ruff '19. 

The list of Freshmen and new graduates 
complete on going to press is: 

Rockefeller, 1923: R. Beardsley, I. Baudrias, 
D. Burr, M. Chestnut, G. Drake, M. Dunn, I. 
Gates, K. Goldsmith, J. Henning, F. Hughes, I. 
Jacobi, H. Kaseburg, F. Knox, S. McDaniel, C. 
McLaughlin, F. Selligman, A. Sheble, B. Wor- 
cester, A. Yarnall. 

Graduates: Misses Earley, Flannery, Need- 
ham, Sinclair, Visserias. 

Pembroke West, 1923: L. Bennett, E. Buhler, 
A. Clement, H. Dunbar, E. Mathews, D. 
Meserve, H. Scribner, H. Sherman, K. Strauss, 
H. Wilson, F. Young. 

Graduates: Misses Barker, Knapp, Richards, 
Woodruff. 

Pembroke East, 1923: C. Goddard, H. 
Humphreys, B. Kilroy, M. Lawrence, M. 
Longyea:, V. Miller, M. Morsman, E. Phil- 
buck, H. Price, A. Shumway, M. von Hofsten. 

Graduates: Misses Gilman, Martin, Mercer, 
Newlin, Spalding. 

Denbigh, 1923: L. K. Bowers, F. Childs, H. 
Hagen, M. Holt, A. Howell, E. Hurd, E. Kel- 
logg, E. Page, K. Raht, H. Rice, S. Saunders, 
J. Schwarz, S. Thomas, E. Vincent, H. Wilson. 

Graduates: Misses Baechle, Chambry, Cobb, 
Dreyfous, Kuhn, Price, Smith, Souchere, Wang, 
Wood, Zrust. 

Merion, 1923: M. Adams, M. Brokaw, M. C. 
Carey, E. Child, A. Fitzgerald, H. George, R. 
Geyer, A. Hay, H. Hoyt, F. Knox, F. Martin, 
L. Mills, R. Raley, J. Richards, A. Smith, D. 
Stewart, J. Ward, E. Wheeler. 

Radnor, 1923: L. Affelder, S. Archbald, L. 
Foley, E. Gray, F. Harrison, M. Hussey, E. 
Jennings, E. Kinsolving, F. Matteson, R. 
McAneny, E. Rhoads. 

Graduates: Misses Bailey, Carrol, Patrick, 
F. Penrose, M. Penrose, Sorvets— The College 
News. 

CHANGES IN FACULTY 

The following new appointments are an- 
nounced : 

Miss Hilda Worthington Smith, A.B., Bryn 
Mawr College, 1910, and A.M. 1911, will be 



acting dean of the college for the next two 
years. She has been for three years director 
of the Community Center of Bryn Mawr, and 
was formerly warden of Rockefeller hall. 

Professor William Bashford Huff, Professor 
of Physics, Professor Howard L. Gray, Professor 
of History, Professor Rhys Carpenter, Professor 
of Classical Archaeology, Professor Howard 
James Savage, Associate Professor of Rhetoric, 
and Dr. James Llewellyn Crenshaw, Associate 
in Physical Chemistry, have returned to the 
College after absence due to various forms of 
War work. Professor Fonger DeHaan, Pro- 
fessor of Spanish, returns after two years' 
absence. 

Professor Florence Peebles has resigned as 
Associate Professor of Physiology on account of 
ill health, and Dr. Sumner Cushing Brooks has 
been appointed Associate Professor of Physi- 
ology and Biochemistry. Dr. Brooks is a Ph.D. 
of Harvard University, 1916, and has lately been 
Research Fellow in Tropical Medicine and 
Assistant in the Harvard Medical School. 

Professor Tenney Frank, Professor of Latin 
Literature, has been called to Johns Hopkins 
University, and Dr. Horace Wetherill Wright, 
A.B., University of Wisconsin, 1908, and Ph.D. 
University of Pennsylvania, 1917, has been 
appointed Associate in Latin Literature. He 
has been Instructor in Latin in the University 
of Missouri 1917-18, and in Oberlin College, 
1918-19. 

Dr. William Roy Smith, Professor of History, 
is traveling in China and India, and his courses 
will be given by Dr. Edith E. Ware, A.B., 
Goucher College, and Ph.D., Columbia Uni- 
versity, Lecturer in History, Smith College, 
1914-19. 

Dr. Marion Parris Smith, Professor of Eco- 
nomics, is also traveling in China and India. 
Dr. George Hermann Deny, from the University 
of Kansas, where he has held the Chair of 
Economics and Industrial Legislation will give 
the courses in Economics announced by Dr. 
Smith. 

In the place of Professor Georgiana Goddard 
King, now studying Art in Spain, Dr. Arthur 
Edwin Bye has been appointed as substitute 
and will offer the courses announced by Professor 
King. Dr. Bye is an A.B. of the University 
of Pennsylvania, 1911, Ph.D., Princeton Uni- 
versity, 1918, and studied Art in Paris. He 
has been Assistant Professor of Art in Vassar 
College from 1916-19. 



110 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly [November 



Miss Mary Sinclair Crawford, A.B., Wilson 
College, will be Instructor in French. 

Miss Helen Walkley Irvin, A.B., Bryn Mawr 
College, 1915, and Miss Gertrude Marshall 
Geer, A.B., Barnard College, 1919, are appointed 
Instructors in English Composition. 

Miss Agnes Murray Macfadzean, M.A., Uni- 
versity of Glasgow, has been appointed Reader 
in English. 

Miss Gertrude Williams, A.B., Oberlin Col- 
lege, 1918, will be Demonstrator in Chemistry, 
and Miss Mary Jane Guthrie, A.M., Univer- 
sity of Missouri, is to be Demonstrator in 
Biology. 

Changes in the wardens of the halls of resi- 
dence follow: Miss Hannah Thayer Carpenter 
A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1898, of Providence, 
R. I., warden of Denbigh Hall as successor to 
Katherine W. McGiffert; Edith Adair, of Brook- 
lyn, N. Y., A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1909, 



warden of Rockefeller Hall as successor to Mrs. 
Adeline Werner Vorys; Leslie Richardson of 
Cambridge, Mass., A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 
1918, as successor to Letitia B. Windle. 

Miss Constance Dowd of New York City, 
A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1916, and recently 
clerk in the Ordnance Bureau of the War Depart- 
ment, will be Assistant Director of Athletics 
and Gymnastics in place of Miss Helen Reed 
Kirk, who resigned to do Y. W. C. A. work 
in France. 

An important addition has been made to the 
Phebe Anna Thorne Open Air Model School 
which is under the direction of the Department 
of Education. A primary department is opened 
this autumn for children from six to nine years 
of age. The instructor is Mrs. W. H. Collinge, 
B.S., of Teachers' College, Columbia University, 
and Graduate Student, Columbia University, 
1919. 



DRIVE GOAL RAISED TO TWO MILLIONS 

Alumnae Hold Enthusiastic Conference at Bryn Mawr to Organize 

for Campaign 



Enthusiasm reached such a high pitch at the 
alumnae conference on the Bryn Mawr Faculty 
Million Dollar Campaign for Salaries held at 
Bryn Mawr on September 26 and 27 that the 
goal was doubled. By a vote of the joint com- 
mittee of faculty, directors and alumnae, the 
amount to be raised was set at $2,000,000. 

Representatives of practically every class 
were present. Members came from Boston, 
Washington, Chicago and St. Louis. These 
alumnae left full of determination to raise the 
money before June and full of plans for pushing 
the campaign through their classes and their 
districts. 

By a unanimous vote it was decided to ask 
Carrie McCormick Slade to be chairman of the 
entire campaign and to ask Edna Fischel 
Gellhorn to be chairman of the Anna Howard 
Shaw Memorial drive. 

The report of a committee consisting of Louise 
Congdon Francis, Edna Fischel Gellhorn, Jessie 
Buchanan, Ruth Furness Porter, Susan Walker 
Fitzgerald, Marion Reilly and Bertha S. Ehlers, 
appointed to formulate the business of the 
conference follows: 



1. In districting the country for the Faculty 
Campaign the twelve Federal Reserve Districts 
shall be used with necessary adaptations, — 
that is the Metropolitan Districts with the 
twelve Federal Reserve Districts grouped 
about them. The chairman of each district 
shall come from the large city of the district 
unless there is an obviously better person else- 
where. 

2. (a) The amount of the fund shall be two 
million instead of one. This decision will have 
to go a's a recommendation to the Directors of 
the College and to the Faculty before being put 
into effect. 

(b) The drive shall begin immediately and 
shall end by Commencement 1920. There shall 
be one big Drive Week simultaneous if possible 
in all districts. 

(c) The basis of payment shall be two years 
from the end of the drive, — that is payments 
shall be completed by June 1922. This will 
allow five semi-annual payments. 

3. Cooperation with the central office. The 
districts shall be definitely and strictly outlined. 
Each Chairman shall be paramount in her own 



1919] 



Two Million Dollar Campaign 



111 



district. All prospects in each district shall be 
filed in card catalogues and cards shall be made 
in triplicate, one set being sent to the central 
office as soon as the prospect's name is placed 
in the district file. Suggestions for names in 
other districts shall be sent to the central office 
by each chairman whenever they are available 
and the central office shall send to each district 
chairman suggestions for prospects in that 
district whenever she receives them from any 
source outside that district. Where for special 
reasons a member of a committee or any other 
person wishes to approach a prospect in a district 
not her own, she may do so only upon consulta- 
tion with the chairman of the district in which 
that prospect lives and with the permission of 
that chairman. Prospects living in one city and 
having business in another shall be considered 
as belonging to the district in which they reside. 
In this respect chairmen shall be especially 
warned concerning the danger in using lists of 
names of Boards of Directors of organizations 
and corporations. 

Each district chairman shall send a bi-monthly 
report to the central office covering the prospects, 
the interviews and the contributions to date. 

Requests for speeches or interviews by mem- 
bers of the faculty shall come from each chair- 
man to the central office as early and as often 
as possible. 

Lists of district chairmen, officers and com- 
mittees of the campaign shall be printed in the 
News and in the Quarterly and shall be made 
as generally available as possible for all mem- 
bers of the Alumnae Association. 

Discussion of the afternoon session on pub- 
licity was continued in the meeting of this 
committee with further help from Miss Ernestine 
Evans and Mrs. Florence Brewer Boeckel, and 
the following decisions were made : 

1. Publicity bulletins shall be sent weekly by 
the central publicity manager to the local pub- 
licity agents giving the local agents 

(a) Advice as to personal visits and inter- 
views with local editors. 

(b) Special information or news to be used at 
the time. Any stories or editorials written at 
the central office to be adapted and used locally. 

2. Local chairmen shall have complete 
schedules of editions of local papers, dailies and 
weeklies, and the time of their going to press, 
and shall send material weekly to all those 
papers. Newspaper syndicates shall be used as 
much as possible. 

3. A recommendation shall be made to metro- 



politan chairmen that wherever possible an 
expert be employed for district publicity. 

Publicity Suggestions 

Further suggestions were made by Mrs. 
Boeckel and Miss Evans as follows: 

A. Public bulletins such as the reports of the 
United States Commissioner of Education 
should be used as much as possible as a back- 
ground upon which to hang our own publicity. 
Wherever possible our publicity should be tied 
up with other current movements such as the 
Harvard Campaign. 

B. The Anna Howard Shaw Memorial is the 
best publicity material we have at present. 
The general publicity should be hung upon it 
even after the Shaw fund is completed. Where 
possible district publicity agents should come 
to the Shaw Memorial Service. 

C. A set of six or twelve political lectures at 
Bryn Mawr by such men as W. C. Ewer the 
editor of the English Labor Paper, the Herald, 
or Graham Wallace would afford excellent pub- 
licity and would undoubtedly be accepted to be 
printed in full in such papers as the Nition or 
the Woman Citizen. It might be possible to 
make reprints of six or eight really good political 
lectures. Such indirect publicity, the kind also 
as is represented by articles in the Sunday 
magazine section of the Times are the most 
dignified and useful kind of publicity. 

D. Subjects for such indirect publicity might 
also be supplied by specially arranged events 
such as an invited visit from the Japanese and 
Chinese scholars, visits from other noted persons 
(the Queen of Belgium was suggested), or by 
specially written articles such as on the various 
professions of Bryn Mawr graduates. 

Any number of articles of personal narrative 
written by President Thomas would be accepted 
by the press and would give excellent indirect 
publicity. 

Motions]Passed 

The motions passed by the Alumnae con- 
ference in its session on Saturday morning, 
Sept. 27, were: 

1. That the report of the committee appointed 
to formulate the business of the sessions of 
Sept. 26 be accepted as a whole. This accep- 
tance includes the recommendation to the 
Faculty and Directors that the amount of the 
fund be changed from one to two millions. 



112 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly [November 



2. That with the approval of the Joint 
Committee a committee of three representing 
Faculty, Alumnae and Directors go to New- 
York on Monday to secure Carrie McCormick 
Slade as chairman of the entire campaign. 

3. That the committee to go to New York to 
secure Mrs. Slade as chairman for the campaign 
be appointed by the joint committee of Faculty, 
Directors and Alumnae. 

In accordance with the above motions the 
members of the joint committee who were 
present (Professor Wheeler, Prof essor Kingsbury 
Mrs. Francis, Mrs. Vauclain, Miss Martha 
Thomas, Miss Reilly), met immediately after 
the afternoon session of the conference and 
ratified the recommendations of the alumnae 
conference. 

1. That the amount of the fund be two million 
dollars. 

2. That Carrie McCormick Slade be ap- 
pointed chairman of the entire campaign, and 
that a committee consisting of Prof. Wheeler, 
Miss Reilly, Miss Harriot Houghteling, Miss 
Kirkbride (as alternate for Miss Reilly), Mrs. 
Learned Hand, Mrs. Gellhorn and Mrs. Francis, 
see Mrs. Slade on Monday, September 28 if it 
is possible to make an appointment with Mrs. 
Slade at that time. 

In answer to the recommendation of the joint 
committee the faculty members of that com- 
mittee met later in the day and approved for 
the Faculty, the change of the amount of the 
fund from one to two millions. 



Alumnae Present 

Alumnae present at the conference included : 

1889— Martha G. Thomas, Ella Riegel. 

1893 — Susan Walker Fitzgerald, S. Frances 
Van Kirk, Lucy M. Donnelly. 

1894— Fay MacCracken Stockwell. 

1895 — Marianna Janney, Elizabeth Conway 
Clark. 

1896— Ruth Furness Porter, Elizabeth B. 
Kirkbride, Hilda Justice. 

1897— Sue A. Blake. 

1898— Elizabeth Nields Bancroft, Mary E. 
Converse. 

1899— Charlotte MacLean. 

1900 — Louise Congdon Francis, Edna Fischel 
Gellhorn. 

1901 — Marion Reilly, Eugenea Fowler 



Neale, Beatrice McGeorge, Ethel Cantlin 
Buckley. 

1903— Kate DuVal Pitts, Eleanor Fleisher 
Riesman, Gertrude Dietrich Smith, Virginia 
T. Stoddard. 

1904 — Martha Rockwell Moorhouse. 

1905— Helen R. Sturgis, Nathalie Fairbank 
Bell. 

1907— Eunice M. Schenck, Harriot P. Hough- 
teling, Alice M. Hawkins, Mary Isabel 
O' Sullivan. 

1908— Myra Elliot Vauclain. 

1909— Evelyn Holt Lowry, Bertha S. Ehlers. 

1910— Hilda W. Smith. 

1911 — Leila Houghteling, Louise G. Russel, 
Charlotte Claflin. 

1912 — Louise Watson, Christine Hammer, 
Marjorie Walter Goodhart, Gertrude Elcock, 
Elizabeth Pinney Hunt, Beatrice Howson. 

1913— Jessie Buchanan, Elizabeth Y. Ma- 
guire, Marian I. Irwin, Olga Kelly, Alice 
Patterson Bensinger, Florence C. Irish. 

1914— Mary C. Smith, Ida W. Pritchett, 
Marjorie- Childs. 

1915— Ruth Glenn Pennell, Helen Taft, 
Katharine McCollin, Isabel Foster. 

1916 — Ruth Lautz, Johanna Ross Chiam. 

1917— Mary R. Hodge, Nathalie McFadden 
Blanton, Constance Hall, Dorothy MacDonald. 

1918— Irene Loeb, Charlotte Dodge, Katha- 
rine Sharpless. 

1919 — Mary Tyler, Gordon Woodbury. 

1920— Frances Von Hofsten. 

Miss Reilly' s Diagram 

The conference opened on Friday morning 
with an explanation by Miss Marion Reilly of 
the proposed organization for the campaign. 
This plan is subject to change and elaboration, 
but an idea of the drive may be gained by 
examining it. 

The joint committee will include three rep- 
resentatives of the faculty, the directors and the 
alumnae association. The faculty will have the 
three main committees, one on speakers and 
collectors, one on publicity and one on the Shaw 
Memorial. The main officers will be the national 
chairman, not yet appointed, the secretary, the 
publicity agent and the chairman of the Shaw 
Memorial Drive. There will also be a national 
committee of distinguished and well known 



1919] 



Two Million Dollar Campaign 



113 



alumnae. In the twelve federal reserve dis- 
tricts there will be local committees consisting 
of a chairman, a secretary, a publicity agent, a 
Shaw Memorial representative and a Victory 
chair representative. Class collectors shall also 
see that their classes are thoroughly covered 
thus reaching all alumnae or former students 
who are abroad and moving from one district 
to another. 

Faculty Point of View 

Dr. Wheeler in presenting the faculty's point 
of view in the drive said : 

"I was put on this program for two topics, 
about one of which I know nothing whatsoever 
and about the other I feel in an interrogative 
mood. With reference to dates for members 
of the faculty who are soliciting for the fund — 
the dates must be arranged from the points of 
view of several different interests. The work of 
the college must go on — we can't go off in the 
middle of the week and cut five lectures unless 
there is prospect of a reward. The convenience 
of the people who may be approached must be 
considered. The last point is negligible as 
friends of the Alumnae must arrange when we 
may interview people. The dates on which 
members of the faculty are to speak should be 
put at week ends or vacations. The Alumnae 
should let us know the best date at which any- 
body should be asked to speak or to come to 
their town for interview purposes. 

"With regard to the second topic — introduc- 
tions and interviews I am totally ignorant. I 
had assumed that people who give to the college 
are divided into two classes — people who give 
whom members of the faculty know and people 
who give whom the members of the faculty do 
notk now. The latter are the only ones who 
have to be stalked. The members of the faculty 
have nothing to do but sit back and wait till the 
call for them comes. If any alumnae or friend of 
the college knows a person there would have to 
be some special reason for a member of the 
faculty to interview them. Everyone on the 
faculty has friends whom they expect to solicit 
for the purposes of this fund and we should, as 
Miss Ehlers has said, send any names to the 
committee so there will be no duplicating. 

"Primarily the faculty drive is really a co- 
operative drive. Not one of the faculty would 
be willing to go into it and ask (though we would 
welcome the 25 per cent increase), if we did not 
feel that the interests of education in general 



were at stake. In the long run the college has 
to be kept at the front." , 

The afternoon session on Friday was devoted 
to publicity. Miss Lucy Martin Donnelly, 
chairman of the faculty committee presided and 
introduced Dean Maddison as the first speaker. 

"As Miss Donnelly has explained, "said 
Dean Maddison, "there has been practically no 
publicity work done in college for a great many 
years. For a short time we had a very excellent 
publicity worker who had been representative 
on a Philadelphia paper, and who got a good 
deal into the papers. After she left Miss Isabelle 
Raub, who as some of you may remember, was 
librarian from 1901-1903 did some work along 
this line. She had very little newspaper ex- 
perience but was able to get some little together 
each week and get it into the papers. When 
she left no one seemed able to take her place. 
Students volunteered but did nothing satis- 
factory. It is very difficult for students to do — 
it needs a mimeograph machine, they need to 
typewrite and need to get into the newspaper 
offices and talk to the editors. They said, 
however, that the Philadelphia editors have been 
most kind and helpful in every way. The only 
difficulty we had was between the morning and 
afternoon papers. 

"As far as I have been able to do I have sent 
from my office to some of the newspapers ordi- 
nary news of the college — news of the opening 
of college, appointments of new members of the 
faculty, the size of the freshman class, very mild 
statistics, news of scholarships and fellowships, 
news of foreign scholars, scholarships or prizes 
that have been founded. That is the only 
material we have been able to prepare in my 
office and it has been done very inadequately. 
I have not had sufficient assistance to get out 
the notices properly. If we wished to get out 
news of commencement we had perhaps 50 or 70 
copies mimeographed — it was most discouraging 
to find that they don't touch it — occasionally 
they select the name of a student from their 
own town and put that in. Three or four news- 
papers which gave a page each week to college 
news have refused since the war to pay for this. 
The New York Timzs occasionally took some. 
The Springfield Republican would take anything 
in the way of new news. The Christian Science 
Monitor takes college news. I can't think of any 
other paper which takes college news. If 
unfortunate news gets into the papers, such as 
the story of policewomen in the streets of Bryn 
Mawr keeping the children from the Bryn Mawr 



114 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[November 



schools in order, gets into the Philadelphia 
papers it is copied in almost every paper in the 
country. We got them to publish a contradic- 
tion but of course it did not get into the other 
papers. 

"Plays, lectures, festivities — reporting these 
we have given up entirely. It would be a good 
thing if when we have distinguished lecturers at 
the college we could get it into the papers. 
Appealing to the papers to send reporters is not 
satisfactory. If we had someone here who 
would treat the thing intelligently, take down 
in shorthand the lecture, get it to the papers 
that night, it would be a good opening. My 
idea about publicity is that you have to have 
something to mount your notice on. On the 
other hand we want to have something to 
balance the social with the academic. 

"The great desire in the newspapers is for 
anything personal. I have a request on my 
desk now for items regarding students from some 
particular town. That paper will not handle 
anything academic. Such things as when a 
student left college, student's house parties, 
etc., is the sort of news they want." 

The point of view of the editor who will 
receive the Bryn Mawr publicity was presented 
by Isabel Foster, '15, of The Waterbury Re- 
publican. Miss Foster said that there were 
three things essential in getting news into 
newspapers, first it must be real news, second, 
it must reach the editor when it is fresh and 
third it must be in correct form. She empha- 
sized the importance of using local names, and 
of not nagging the editor if an article did not 
appear, but simply giving him another and 
another. 

Plans for Publicity 

Miss Ernestine Evans, the newspaper and 
publicity writer of wide experience and success 
who is directing the campaign publicity outlined 
her pr ogram for the campaign in part as follows: 

"Your publicity for the next year is going to 
be divided into three kinds. There is a certain 
kind of publicity that should go to all the 
alumnae as you are more interested in what you 
got out of college, what you can get out of it 
and what your daughters can get. 

u The second kind of publicity must reach the 
donors. 

Third, publicity for the public, creating in- 
terest in Eryn Mawr and general good feeling 
that will work around in a circle. If there is 
general publicity the alumnae will feel and the 



donors will feel that they are taking part in an 
institution important to the whole country and 
not just the faculty of the college. 

For the donors we have to begin with much 
the same sort of prospectus that Harvard got 
out — giving the plans of the college, plans for 
the future, something in relation to the salaries 
of the faculty. 

You have a very definite reputation that 
means something not only here but in England. 
— your high scholastic standing, at least for 
getting in. 

We have always checked Bryn Mawr in con- 
nection with the number of students from Bryn 
Mawr who have gone to Japan to teach. The 
fact that Miss Tsuda was at one time a student 
here is an extra feather in your cap. Make a 
story of every connection Bryn Mawr has with 
the Orient. Bring out the things that have a 
touch of color and of specialization and make a 
story of it. 

You have a problem before you — you want to 
raise a million for Bryn Mawr. Bryn Mawr is 
a private institution, rather small and not so 
very old compared with other institutions. It 
is not an easy task to say that we who are not a 
public thing want a million dollars. What you 
want to do is to "sell" Bryn Mawr — you have 
to sell Bryn Mawr and Bryn Mawr's problem 
to the donors. You have three or four talking 
points and I would suggest that you put the 
Bryn Mawr point last. The cost of living has 
gone up and you will repeat that over and over. 
You are going to get your money from business 
people and business people are not sympathetic, 
they have heard enough from their employees 
about " the cost of living has gone up. " They 
will hope that you do that part of the publicity 
with as little emphasis as possible. 

Second — With the war over the country has 
an enormous educational problem. Harvard, 
Princeton, and the campaign of all organized 
common school teachers in the country will 
help you because they too want higher taxes, 
higher salaries and they will help all along the 
line. 

Your third talking point is going to be 
women's education and I think in that many 
ways, certainly for any magazine articles, that 
you get in, that is a very strong point. It has 
taken 60 years to get suffrage and as soon as we 
get that along come drives for men's colleges 
for more prestige, just at the time women think 
they are going to walk side by side with men, 
the men come along and usurp all the best 



1919] 



Two Million Dollar Campaign 



115 



professors in the country. It is absurd to raise 
twenty million for Harvard when only one 
million is being raised for Bryn Mawr because 
you are still in the same comparative position 
you were before. 

Indirect publicity is very useful. For instance 
yesterday I went over to see the editor of Colliers 
— it is good to have weeklies get out things at 
the same time. Princeton and Harvard have 
been getting out tons of material. Miss Taft 
is willing to write two articles in the first two 
months of college but he doesn't want her to 
write about Bryn Mawr but about her experi- 
ences abroad, which is simply a chore for her 
to do but she will do it. 

I hope the faculty and students will write if 
any newspaper or magazine asks them to, and 
tuck in that they are from Bryn Mawr. 

Mrs. Francis and I spoke of asking several 
Bryn Mawr students in every locality to send 
letters to the local papers. We thought it would 
be best to have the letters typed here and sent 
to them to sign, just a little personal letter about 
Bryn Mawr, one on women's education. 

Miss Donnelly said the war gave publicity at 
Bryn Mawr a blow. If the war gave Bryn 
Mawr a blow it didn't do it at Vassar or Smith. 
For example, they had a publicity agent to 
look after the Smith College units in France. 
President McCracken of Vassar is a perfect 
publicity manager. When they got the Red 
Cross to put a special undergraduate course in, 
preparing for hospital training, they spent a 
great deal of money in the weeklies describing 
the summer course for nurses. There was a 
great deal of publicity done in the New York 
papers. Vassar never misses a trick. You have 
to do things. — there are many things done at 
Vassar for publicity purposes. 

Expert's Advice 

Mrs. Florence Brewer Boeckel, publicity ad- 
viser for the National Association of Public 
Health Nurses and for the National Woman's 
Party, as an alumna of Vassar gave an outline 
of successful publicity methods. 

"I hope you won't be annoyed in case the 
wrong sort of story gets into the papers — that 
sort of thing is very quickly forgotten by the 
casual reader. Publicity is a word everyone 
uses. They utter it in a tone that varies from 
awe to a sort of scorn. Publicity is an art — 
perhaps the great democratic art, it is never 
an art for art's sake. In giving out publicity 



you are doing no more than giving an account 
to the public of what you are doing and pointing 
out why you should be allowed to do it. 

" Congress was the first to realize the value of 
publicity in that connection — even the State 
Department has recently secured a publicity 
director. I don't doubt our diplomacy will be 
more sympathetically received by the public. 
Last week a bill was introduced providing for a 
Publicity Department in the government. 
Things accomplished by publicity during the war 
convinced them of the need. Take the aircraft 
program — the Council of National Defense 
decided that we should have airplanes, they 
invited influential men to a dinner, within a 
month everyone was convinced that we needed 
aircraft. 

"Every nation that desires its liberty has a 
press agent in Washington. All of these foreign 
governments have hired American press agents. 

"The important thing for the publicity agent 
is not what story he has to tell — that is simply 
the raw material with which to work — but the 
way of putting that story up to give to other 
persons. 

" It is a publicity agent's business to know the 
workings of a newspaper office. The copy must 
go in in good form. Another thing to bear in 
mind in sending the newspapers any news is that 
you are competing with news of world-wide 
interest. You have other departments — take- 
the fashion department, and pictures will get 
publicity when nothing else will. A brief 
synopsis under a picture counts more than 
columns that nobody reads. 

"The magazines of the Sunday papers are 
eager for special stories. Consult with the 
editors, find out what sort of story they want, 
whose name they want signed to it. Find out 
who are the feature writers — you might be able- 
to get someone to come down and write up Bryn 
Mawr if you can emphasize something else than 
the money. If the object of the faculty trip is 
the need of education throughout the country 
and not just money, people will be interested. 

"I have learned a great deal from one of the 
women for whom I have worked — Alice Paul is 
perhaps one of the greatest publicity agents in 
the world. Her aim was to make suffrage in- 
teresting and vital and she did that. She is now 
raising funds for the last half of the campaign 
for the ratification of the suffrage amendment. 
She sent out letters telling everything that has 
been accomplished by the money that those 
people had given in the last six years. That is- 



116 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly [November 



what you should do in regard to Bryn Mawr. 
If any of your various grads are in Europe or 
holding prominent positions bring that out. 

"The National organizations I worked for both 
had state branches. They have state and city 
clubs and work through them. 

''Go to see the editors — editors don't like to be 
bothered when they are busy but do like to feel 
of importance and you can find from any member 
of the staff when is the opportune moment. 

"in the matter of magazines it is necessary to 
go to the editor and find out the kind of material 
he wants. Some one member from the faculty 
or alumnae delegated to visit various editors 
would be a good piece of work. 

'I always remember what was told to me when 
I first started out: When you start to write a 
story try to imagine meeting somebody on the 
street that you want to talk to. First you must 
stop him, — that is what you want to do with 
your story, — You must stop your reader. You 
musn't scorn to make these as human and 
interesting as possible. The first thing is to 
stop your person and you can then be as aca- 
demic as you like." 

What Has Been Done 

Miss Elizabeth B. Kirkbride '96, alumnae 
member of the board of directors of the college 
outlined in the following speech on Saturday 
morning the history of alumnae gifts and 
campaigns. 

"We don't want to spend our time on ancient 
history," said Miss Kirkbride, "but I think it 
just as well that we be reminded of what the 
alumnae association has been doing, — this is 
part of a long history of collections by the 
alumnae. 

"The first fund was made when the alumnae 
association was two years old, it was a very 
modest one and the first installments went to 
the Bryn Mawr green house. That was inter- 
rupted by the raising of the J. C. Rhoades 
scholarships, '94-'97. 

"The alumnae began to have a large idea of 
collecting when Dora Keen was president of the 
alumnae in 1900 and a circular was gotten up 
stating what were then the urgent needs of the 
college. Its stating that we needed a half mil- 
lion for education then was more than a million 
now because we are thinking in larger terms 
now. What we needed then was a new library, 
dormitory and power plant and the alumnae 
cooperated with the president and the directors 



to build the new library. In the early part of 
1901 Evangeline W. Andrews went to Mr. Rocke- 
feller and suggested that he make us a gift. Mr. 
Rockefeller decided to give the money for a 
dormitory and power plant on condition that 
the alumnae furnish the library. Boston com- 
menced to get to work first, it developed a 
strong committee with a good advisory com- 
mittee and started out going to people and 
asking for large sums of money. President 
Thomas collected large sums of money and in 
the final report the Boston committee was 
credited with $53,000 of the amount raised for 
the library. We were trying to complete this 
fund by June 1902 when the Denbigh fire came 
in the early part of 1902. Through the kind- 
ness of the Pennsylvania Railroad telegrams 
were sent to every alumnae announcing a meet- 
ing in Taylor, saying "Come or say what you 
will give." Fourteen thousand dollars was 
raised, for the Denbigh fire was the result of our 
not having electric lights — it was caused by a 
student's lamp. 

"The Educational fund was begun in 1904. 
It was at that time that the tuition fee was 
raised $5.0. The alumnae tried to see if by 
raising a fund that could be prevented, and 
this collection went on during 1904-1909. The 
alumnae raised the first $100,000 of their Edu- 
cational fund. In 1908 class collections were 
stopped and the great gift of $100,000 came in 
through the class of 1907. Within two weeks 
of the time that gift was made to the College 
the General Education Board proposed to give 
$100,000 provided we would clear the college 
of debt. 

"The alumnae gave the amount they raised, 
$150,000, for academic endowment. The alum- 
nae also gave $54,000 toward the debt. 

"There were one or two results from this 
campaign — the legacy of $50,000 from Mr. Gil- 
lingham and the Phebe Anna Thome endow- 
ment was the result of Miss Thomas's appeal 
for this fund. 

"The class collections went on after 1910 with- 
out any special impetus. In 1910 they had 
reached $30,000. The Association voted to turn 
all that had been collected into a memorial chair 
for Miss Mary Garrett. That was the first 
fund on which we had undergraduate cooper- 
ation, that was the first time the alumnae and 
undergraduates worked together for endowment. 

"The point I would like to make is the relation 
of the class collections and the local committees. 
They are a permanent means of collecting money 



1919] 



Two Million Dollar Campaign 



117 



from the alumnae and keeping the alumnae 
informed about the college but when it comes 
to a big campaign we have to organize people 
into local groups that can meet and do work 
with outside people. The simplest thing is to 
say that primarily gifts from individual alumnae 
if nothing is said about them, ought to be 
credited to the class collectors. If the alumna 
wishes her gift credited to her locality she should 
state that. The class collectors ought to be on 
the local committees because they know about 
the alumnae, about what they are capable of 
giving, and what their interests are." 

Situation of College 

The present situation of the college was ex- 
plained by Acting President Helen H. Taft who 
spoke in part as follows : 

"I feel as if it were almost superfluous to 
discuss the situation financial and academic be- 
cause I feel that you must have heard nothing 
but that discussed in the past years and it has 
been touched on in many ways yesterday and 
today. 

"We will be glad to furnish you with whatever 
figures you want in the financial situation. 
President Thomas and Mr. Hurst, the Comp- 
troller, drew up an illuminating set of figures 
(published in this issue of the Quarterly) it 
shows why the endowment is needed, exactly 
what was done with the original endowment and 
is a full statement of all gifts ever made to the 
College and how they have been used. The 
crux is the discrepancy between the teaching 
of each student and the amount each student 
pays — the cost is $429 a year and each student 
pays $200. The income from tuition fees in 
1917-1918 was $89,000 and the teaching salaries, 
not including the administrative, were $119,846. 

"The rise in board, room rents and emergency 
fees was impossible to avoid. The rise in the 
cost of living in the last few years has of course 
made it impossible for the College to continue 
its policy of paying for the board and room rent 
covering the cost of living in the halls unless 
the rates in the halls were raised. Table board 
has risen from 42 cents to 53 cents per person 
per day, a total rise of $15,000. The wages of 
maids has risen over $10,000. The wages of 
the men on the grounds has risen over $21,000. 
There has been a proportionate rise in the sala- 
ries of stenographers and all the wages paid in 
the College, except the professors' salaries, and 



also a proportionate rise in all materials. To 
meet this it has been necessary to increase the 
rates to students. 

"In 1917 the war emergency fee of $50 was 
added and in that year there was no deficit. In 
1918 the war emergency fee of $50 was continued. 
In spite of this the College last year had a deficit 
of $30,000. The prospects for the year follow- 
ing, that is the year 1919, was a larger deficit — 
the deficit for the present year would run to 
almost $80,000 unless there is a rise in board 
and room rent. The Board voted to raise the 
board and room rents — the most expensive 
rooms were raised proportionately, the least 
expensive raised to $100. 

"This brings up the question of the raise in 
rates and whether it is really absolutely fatal 
to raise the rates higher or whether it is some- 
thing we have to face. Not many girls have 
had to leave Bryn Mawr because of the raise 
in college rates but we have an increased number 
of girls who need help, an increased number of 
applications for scholarships. Some students 
have not returned because of the increase in 
rates but they were in every case the poor 
scholars and never the more desirable students. 
There is no doubt, however, that many are not 
able to enter Bryn Mawr because of the raise 
in the rates here. 

"President Thomas has said that the student's 
parents should do more to meet the cost of 
educating their daughters, that it is wrong that 
the professors should be made to suffer to edu- 
cate the daughters of men who are able to pay 
the cost of educating their daughters. If we 
raise the rates it means that we will draw only 
from a certain stratum, the poorer girl will have 
to go to a college near home or to the state 
colleges. Personally that seems to me the poor- 
est policy for us to pursue. Whatever happens 
in the final analysis, it seems to me we want 
to keep the college according to our own ideals 
so that we draw girls from every strata of wealth, 
and maintain our standing in this respect no 
matter what the final outcome may be. 

"Everything has been done to economize — 
the food has been cut down and there are already 
coming in complaints. We have always felt 
that our students should be well fed but the 
food will have to be cut to meet our estimates. 
"A committee of directors has been appointed 
to make reports to the Directors on possible 
economies in the college. We want to do every- 
thing to cut down the cost in the college but 



118 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly [November 



the real financial problem is how we can go on 
running the college on the present financial 
standing without raising the rates. 

"As to the academic situation. First, the 
effect of the low salaries on the professors we 
already have. There is a certain level of com- 
fort minus luxury which is more desirable for 
an academic atmosphere than luxury. There 
is something attractive in the idea of the poor 
scholar leading the intellectual life without too 
many of the creature comforts. Since the war 
faculty life has taken on new meaning. When 
the strain of the war had relaxed the one press- 
ing anxiety in everyone's mind was how two 
ends were to be made to meet, which is a most 
undesirable frame of mind for men and women 
who are trying to do their best work. Without 
wishing to bring forward their own needs or 
their own complaints it was inevitable that a 
very large proportion of the faculty should worry 
about how they were going to get through the 
year and the next years and if they had families 
how they were going to support them. Living 
conditions became more difficult when many of 
the full professors were unable to continue to 
live in their houses and when scarcely any 
member of the faculty was able to have a serv- 
ant. It is not a question of wanting to impress 
their plaints on the public but there simply can 
be no other first interest in the minds of men and 
women living on the salaries now paid and try- 
ing to live on any respectable basis. 

"Next is the question of getting professors. 
Every college realizes that the younger men 
who were thinking of going into teaching have 
been going into the other professions. They 
are less and less thinking of taking their Ph.D. 
and going into collegiate teaching, more and 
more thinking of doing something else that will 
be more immediately remunerative or will seem 
more attractive. That situation must be met. 
The large men's colleges will be able to meet 
the situation — they have such numbers of 
wealthy alumni that they will be able to raise 
the professors' salaries to a living wage. The 
question for us is whether we are going to sink 
into another class, and have to take the second 
rate professors or have Bryn Mawr as desirable 
for a young man going into teaching as any of 
the men's colleges. 

"The wealthy men of the country certainly 
owe the professors a living. The Bryn Mawr 
College faculty is pressing their claim on the 
public in the most reasonable and mannerly 
way possible. They would be justified in strik- 



ing — they have a better case than the Baptist 
ministers who are now on strike. Maybe it is 
heretical for me to say this, being an acting 
college president, but I feel that the strike 
would not be against the college executives, the 
college directors or trustees, but against the 
public, which ought to be made to pay for its 
education. I think they would be justified in 
striking and refusing to serve the country on 
the present financial terms because they have 
suffered more than any of the professions whose 
strikes we are now facing." 

Shaw Memorial Explained 

The Anna Howard Shaw Memorial was the 
original idea of Dr. Susan M. Kingsbury and 
it was she who unfolded the plan to the alumnae 
conference. 

"Dr. Shaw told a story of having been repri- 
manded by her father for being in the woods 
all one day and not attending to household 
duties. She replied, 'Father, some day I am 
going to college and some day before I die I 
will be worth $10,000.' 

"You have read of the struggles she made to 
get the necessities for her college training, and 
more particularly the hunger and cold and suffer- 
ing she endured in Boston when endeavoring to 
get her theological education when with that 
marvelous strength that she had in that frail 
body, she not only conducted the pastorate of 
two or three churches but went up to Boston 
to secure her medical course. 

"When word of her death came the first re- 
sponse must have been, that to such a woman 
should be erected a suitable memorial, and then 
the next thought that memorial should be dedi- 
cated to the education of young women and the 
next thought why should not this be dedicated 
to the memory of Anna Howard Shaw at Bryn 
Mawr? She was at Bryn Mawr last May Day 
— she seemed very feeble, — she said that no- 
where was she so happy as at Bryn Mawr and 
at no educational institution did she feel the 
enthusiasm and thrills that she did at Bryn 
Mawr. Is it not fitting that part of this fund 
be raised for the perpetuation of the work which 
Dr. Shaw continued, following the career of 
Susan B. Anthony and when we realize how 
much Miss Thomas meant to Dr. Shaw and 
Miss Anthony in their early struggles for woman 
suffrage? In the electorship now being thrust 
upon us is our one largest responsibility — and 
in order to educate our women we must have 



1919] 



Two Million Dollar Campaign 



119 



women properly prepared to teach women, to 
prepare them for the electoral power. I wonder 
if we have not a greater appeal to make than 
asking for a memorial contribution for teaching 
political science but whether the members of 
the Faculty directorate are not in duty bound 
to put before the country the need of this type 
of education, the preparation of women for the 
teaching of politics or for leadership in politics. 
Somehow, the women of this country must 
assume the responsibility for preparing women 
for the electoral vote and I believe that if we 
initiate that sort of memorial it will go in other 
women's colleges. The drive should be along 
this line and arouse all the spirit that ought to 
go with it in such a campaign." 

Mrs. Edna Fischel Gellhorn added to the 
growing enthusiasm for the Shaw Memorial by 
speaking as follows: 

"All that is left to me is to add a few points 
to Miss Reilly's picture. The Shaw fund has 
a chairman, that chairman must have a national 
committee and I am awfully afraid we are for- 
getting the men, so let's put some men on that 
committee — we might have President Wilson and 
Ex-President Taf t because both of these men were 
so intimately connected with Anna Howard 
Shaw. I am sure Dr. Shaw had no more ardent 
admirer than President Wilson unless it was 
Ex-President Taft. Her last efforts were to 
aid Ex-President Taft in putting over his League 
of Nations. Dr. Shaw was a Methodist minister 
so let's enlist their efforts. There is the Na- 
tional Republican Chairman who was a devoted 
friend of Dr. Shaw's. There is Mrs. William 
Kent, Mrs. Charles Tiffany, Dr. Kingsbury. 

"The federal reserve districts will serve our 
purposes for advertising very well. There are 
twelve districts — each will have a district chair- 
man, her name must appear on the letterhead. 
She will have associated with her a Bryn Mawr 
alumna in each state and a suffrage chairman 
in each state who would preferably not be a 
Bryn Mawr alumna. The Shaw chairman and 
the chairman of the whole campaign must be 
perfectly in accord. 

"How the money is to go — all the money is 
to come here at once. If this is going to be a 
whirlwind drive and we are all to be kept in 
touch with exactly what is happening every- 
where^ — and it is going to be a whirlwind drive — 
we are going to have the $100,000 for the Anna 
Howard Shaw chair by the ninth of November. 
Then the national services in memory of Anna 



Howard Shaw are to be held, most appropri- 
ately, in Philadelphia. 

"We want everybody who contributes to this 
fund to have his or her name enrolled. We will 
have the names put on sheets of paper which 
will afterward be bound into a book and pre- 
sented with appropriate ceremonies when the 
chair is presented to Bryn Mawr college. 

"President Thomas has cabled that she wishes 
to give the first thousand dollars to this fund. 

"The publicity will be run from headquarters. 
We will send in from all districts everything 
that will help. If the general committee turns 
down the string of dinners that I suggested, we 
will work the dinners for the Anna Howard Shaw 
fund. Someone suggested asking The Woman 
Citizen to give a page asking everyone to send 
their money to the headquarters. We should 
pro rata the state suffrage organizations. 

"This is the nucleus of the whole thing — we 
have to put the punch back of it and make 
other people think that they want to be part of 
the movement to give a fitting memorial to Anna 
Howard Shaw." 

"I wish to say that the Chairman for this 
fund is Mrs. George Gellhorn of St. Louis," 
said Mrs. Francis. 

Mrs. Gellhorn replied — "I feel that a person 
who is used to money, to handling large sums, 
is the ideal person for this position. I will work 
just as hard whether chairman or not but if we 
can find this idyllic person I think she should 
be it." 

How Others Will Do It 

The final session of the conference was devoted 
to hearing what other colleges were doing in 
their campaign for raising large sums. 

Mrs. Barrett Andrews of Smith College told 
of the coming drive for two millions to raise 
fifteen dormitories, a gymnasium and a music 
building in the following speech. 

"I am afraid I don't come with many ideas 
that are going to help you," said Mrs. Andrews. 
"You have heard of our President, Mr. Neilson, 
who came to us two years ago with the expressed 
stipulation that he would not be used for raising 
money. Taking from his hands the raising of 
money meant that somebody else would have 
to do it. A new branch of the college was 
formed — the gifts and endowment committee, 
composed of two members of the Board of 
Trustees, two members of the alumnae and the 
president, ex-officio. All plans to finance the 



120 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly [November 



college go through the hands of that committee. 
We have an alumnae council — an advisory body. 
At a meeting last February when the war work 
was drawing to a close they entertained Mr. 
Neilson at a dinner and presented the needs 
of the college. The council recommended to 
the alumnae that with the endorsement of the 
gifts and endowment committee the alumnae set 
about raising two million dollars. That recom- 
mendation was adopted in June and a committee 
was appointed to raise $2,000,000. 

"This is called the building fund. We need 
15 dormitories and then won't have all the 
students on the campus. We must have a music 
building and we must have a gymnasium. One 
and one-half million will be for buildings — three- 
fourths of it for the dormitories, and when these 
are built and rents come in that will go toward 
the endowment. Like you, our faculty are not 
being properly rewarded. 

"Our alumnae committee has ten members — a 
chairman, a faculty member, an undergraduate 
member, secretary, treasurer, and president, a 
chairman of publicity, a chairman of outside 
donors, chairman of classes and a chairman of 
clubs. We have a strong alumnae association — 
6500 are paid members of the alumnae. We 
needed that organization to maintain our relief 
unit in the field. We have about 45 clubs and 
the funds for war work were raised by those 
clubs. It was decided that the budget for war 
work would be $119,000. It was with no diffi- 
culty that we obtained $150,000 from the 
alumnae. We are very anxious to use that 
organization immediately. In the past Smith 
graduates have formed little groups that were 
just social clubs. Now all have been working 
for war work for the college. We are anxious to 
give them all something to do so the central 
committee is working with them — helping them 
plan their winter work. 

"We also approached our alumnae through our 
classes. The Smith people are trained to give 
every five years, to give through their clubs 
and through their classes. The chairman of 
classes will try and influence the reunion gifts 
so that they will be given to this fund. The 
chairman of outside donors — we received from 
our alumnae names of people outside college 
circles, the names of people who might be ap- 
proached. Before that possible donor was ap- 
proached we got every possible bit of informa- 
tion we could. We have a system of cards and 
those cards were filled with every sort of infor- 
mation, then we studied them, tried to find the 



best person to approach each person, found 
what their interests were, etc. 

"Our campaign classes are directly patterned 
on the Harvard fund school held in July. We 
are going to recount just where Smith women 
have succeeded. Someone who has great vision 
will tell what Smith women should accomplish. 
The members of the faculty will tell the various 
needs of the college. We will train these people 
to go out through the country and raise money. 
We think we must be prepared to answer ques- 
tions on what Smith College is doing, has done 
and what we hope to do. One of the professors 
will give his budget for the last three years show- 
ing what it is to live on this inadequate salary. 
The chairman of clubs will give a talk on the 
methods that are to be used, how the money 
is to be handled. 

"We will not begin to take pledges on the fund 
until after the first of January. I hope we will 
have a short time limit, it has been so successful 
with the Liberty Loans, although we voted to 
devote two years to the collection of this fund." 

Vassar's Methods 

Miss Elizabeth F. Johnson gave a description 
of the Vassar drive for $450,000 last winter 
from the point of view of an alumna who was 
following the work. 

"I suppose $2,000,000 will be the amount we 
will try to raise also," began Miss Johnson. 
"Last autumn we were faced with the rather 
staggering fact that the college had a deficit of 
$450,000. About $175,000 of that was due to 
the fact that the college had contracted for a 
new heating plant before the war and the $175,- 
000 represented the difference between the pre- 
war cost and the actual cost. Then $125,000 
was due to the fire, that was the increased cost 
of re-building over the insurance and we had 
carried what had been an adequate insurance. 
We were busy with the Vassar units then. We 
followed the same general plan as the Smith 
collections. The committee tried to use all the 
most modern business methods. We did not 
have, as we have now, a complete card catalogue 
indicating what each person would probably 
give. We have now for the first time a paid 
executive secretary of the association who is paid 
about as much as an associate professor of the 
college. She has under her two stenographers 
who are themselves alumnae of the college. 

"One of our most successful bits of propa- 
ganda was a little eight to ten page leaflet called 



1919] 



Two Million Dollar Campaign 



121 



"Carry On, Vassar." It was gotten out in all 
sorts of different ways — it didn't always come 
in the same sort of envelope, it came at irregular 
intervals. It told about the reorganization of 
the alumnae association, it told about the com- 
mittees that were formed, it told of the work 
of the Vassar units in France, it told of interest- 
ing things that happened in college, it scantily 
mentioned the emergency fund and always in 
a different place but it always told just what 
had happened to the emergency fund to date. 
It never suggested that the fund would not be 
raised, it was always optimistic though there 
must have been times when there were grave 
doubts about it. 

"President McCracken had a very fruitful 
idea. The college worked out what each stu- 
dent paid and what the college paid for each 
student in a given decade. The decade 1907- 
1917, which was when our $500 rate was raised, 
was the decade when the students were most 
indebted to the college. A statement was sent 
to the parents of those in college at that time 
and many of the parents paid the difference in 
the amount. A fairly large fund was raised in 
that way. 

"Quite a large number of people wrote to the 
committee that they would contribute again on 
the last day if the fund was not completed. 
Some unknown alumna, and she is still unknown, 
offered $150,000 if the rest of it was raised. 

"On February 1st we ended with nearly 
$100,000 over what we had intended to get." 

Inside of Harvard Drive 

Mr. Herbert Lincoln Clark, husband of Eliza- 
beth Conway Clark '95 and chairman of the 
Philadelphia district in the Harvard Endow- 
ment Drive outlined the methods in this cam- 
paign for fifteen million and more. 

"I take for granted that you want me to 
tell of the methods Harvard is taking to extract 
this money," Mr. Clark began. "On its present 
financial basis it is impossible for Harvard to 
keep her primacy. They are very modest, — they 
need forty-six million and are asking for fifteen. 
The campaign was started in the form of the 
Harvard Endowment. It was organized almost 
entirely by Mr. Thomas Lamont. It is entirely 
a graduate body working with the alumnae but 
independent of it. It was started before the 
war with an executive committee of five and 
was run largely from New York. The war 



came on and the work was stopped. When the 
armistice was signed we got busy. Mr. Lamont 
and Mr. Wadsworth are the joint and alternate 
chairmen. We have a committee from all parts 
of the country — 130 members. They do not do 
much of the active work, the real work is done 
in New York by the executive committee of 
twenty. Nine of them are in New York, one 
in San Francisco, one, St. Louis, three, Boston, 
Pittsburgh, Englewood, N. J. We have a vice 
chairman, a general manager who is also the 
publicity manager. The whole direction of the 
campaign comes from the office in New York. 
"There are two ways of getting this money. 
To get it we have to show the public that there 
is need for it, and there comes the publicity man, 
John Price Jones. Bits of news come out all 
over the country in the newspapers — you get 
the benefit of these. 

"The executive branch is handled through the 
division chairmen — the country is divided into 
58 divisions, 8 outside of the country, making 
66 divisions in all. The division chairman in 
turn take their divisions and divide them into 
zones. Each zone chairman is responsible to the 
division chairman, each zone chairman is re- 
sponsible for seeing that each man in the zone 
is given an opportunity to contribute, each divi- 
sion chairman is responsible for seeing that each 
man in the division is given an opportunity to 
contribute. Meanwhile John Price Jones is 
going everywhere and seeing everybody. 

"We have a duplicate card catalogue of every 
Harvard man. These cards are sorted and sent 
to the division chairmen, each division chairman 
divides them and sends them to the zone chair- 
men. Each zone chairman sends them to the 
committee chairmen so that every man will be 
reached. 

"There are a series of bulletins sent out to 
all chairmen — giving information as to what the 
college needs and going into details as to the 
methods of reaching the various men. 

"We want the money to come from four 
sources. First, we want every college man to 
give. First the little man, we want him to feel 
that he is having a hand in this. Then the 
middle man, the man who can give $100 for 
five years or $500 for one year. Then the large 
man — he will be handled directly from head- 
quarters. The fourth is the non-collegiate class. 
Many people in this country who have not 
been to college recognize the value of a college 
education and can be gotten to give large sums. 



122 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly [November 



We have organized in New York an advisory 
committee composed of 30 men none of whom 
has ever gone to college and they have all 
accepted. 

"This money is payable in installments up to 
five years. We will take cash, promises to pay 
or securities. It helps to spread the payments 
out over five years. When I said that we would 
get fifteen million but not now, I meant that it 
is an unexpressed hope that many of these men 
will get the habit of paying and will keep it up, 
even after the five years. 

"Another feature well worth considering is the 
effect upon the income tax. A gift to an edu- 
cational institution can be deducted from the 
most taxable income, whether in cash or securi- 
ties. If a man with a taxable income of a mil- 
lion gives $150,000 away and deducts it from 
his taxable income it is only an actual gift of 
$40,000 — the rest will come from the govern- 
ment. 

"The question of giving quotas to the various 
divisions was taken up. First they took the 
original sum of eleven million and divided it by 
the 38,000 graduates and found that it equals 
about $300. Next they divided the territory up 
the same as the liberty loan divisions — that gave 
still a different sum. Third, they took the Red 
Cross plan, which gave a still different sum. 
So they have not given any definite quotas — we 
want all we can get. 

"They have what they call the $25,000 Club 
and we want 200 members of this club. 

"The Old Grad Summer School was very 
effective. They gave a dinner one night and 
there were 130 there. They took us all over the 
university, had talks with every dean, we learned 
all the needs of the College, saw all the bright 
spots, too. 

"All the expenses have been underwritten and 
will not come out of the fund. 

"The Estimate Committee goes over the cards 
and notes on them what they think each man 
ought to be able to give. They do not tell the 
collector that he should insist on that sum but 
they are supposed to work mighty hard to get 
it. That gives the man who is collecting the 
money some idea of what he can aim for. 

"Each contribution is entered on a sheet, the 
cash is entered there, how the payments are to 
be made, the whole nature of the gift is entered. 
That is taken to the chairman of the division or 
zone in which it happens to be. If it is a check 
he sends it direct to New York. If securities 
the zone chairman sends them to a trust company 



in New York. The collector takes a list of the 
securities and sends them to the chairman and 
to the trust company in New York he sends 
word that these securities are coming." 

The conference closed with every alumnae 
representative present feeling ready and strong 
for the battle and filled with ideas for pushing 
the drive to a successful close in her district. 
A tour of the campus added to the consciousness 
of the preciousness of Bryn Mawr and her influ- 
ence for good. Those who did not have to leave 
immediately enjoyed a demonstration of the 
Eurhythmies of Jaques Dalcroze under the direc- 
tion of P. de Montoliu in the gymnasium on 
Saturday evening. 

Way to Help 

Dear Friend, Bryn Mawr College, like Prince- 
ton, Harvard and others, is making every effort 
just now to increase her Endowment Funds, so 
as to meet the desperate need for better salaries 
for the teaching staff. 

As an alumna of Bryn Mawr, I want to help 
swell this Endowment, and I am asking you 
to help, too. But I do not ask you to contribute 
one penny. 

All I ask is that you will permit me to take 
care of your magazine subscriptions, whether 
new or renewal, for the next year. I can handle 
subscriptions to any magazine published in the 
United States, and I have a special agency with 
the following magazines: 

Ladies Home Journal $1 . 75 

Country Gentleman 1 .00 

Saturday Evening Post 2 .00 

Woman's Home Companion 2 . 00 

American Magazine 2 . 00 

McClure's Magazine 2 .00 

Collier's Weekly 2.50 

Cosmopolitan 2 .00 

Good Housekeeping 2 . 00 

Delineator 2 .00 

Everbody's Magazine 2 .00 

Century 4.00 

St. Nicholas 3.00 

American Boy 2 .00 

Atlantic Monthly 4.00 

World's Work 4.00 

Whatever commission comes to me from these 
subscriptions I shall contribute to the Endow- 
ment Fund of Bryn Mawr College. 

It's time to think about Christmas. This 
splendid year, more than ever before, our gifts 
should be beautiful, useful, and yet inexpen- 



1919] Answers to Financial Questions 123 

sive. A magazine subscription makes an ideal your Christmas subscription list and let me 

gift; one that renews itself repeatedly through- have it at once. In this way you and I shall 

out the year. I will care for your gift orders help each other, and both profit. You will be 

promptly and efficiently. And I will see that spared the drudgery of Christmas shopping, 

to each friend or relative to whom you give and I shall be able to help my glorious Alma, 

a Christmas subscription is sent a handsome Mater in this time of her great need. 

Gift Announcement, rich with the spirit of Awaiting your early reply, I am, 

Christmas. Very truly yours, 

As several publishers are planning to increase (Mrs. William H.) Mary Kinsley Best, '08, 

their rates I would suggest that you make up 1198 Bush wick Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. 



BRYN MAWR FACULTY CAMPAIGN FOR SALARIES 

Answers to Financial Questions Prepared by the President 
of the College and the Comptroller 

Cost of teaching each undergraduate student in Bryn Mawr College in 1917-18 $429 .00 

Each student pays 200.00 

Difference $229.00 

This must be met by income from Endowment. 

Income from tuition fees in 1917-18 $89,000.00 

Paid out for teaching salaries in 1917-18 (no administrative salaries included) 119,846.00 

The entire income from Endowment funds, tuition fees and war emergency fees of $100 per 
student during the current year 1918-19 is not sufficient to meet purely academic expenses. 

Academic expenses include fellowships, scholarships, upkeep of academic buildings required for 
teaching (not dormitories), laboratory and library appropriation, class room supplies, academic 
administration, and all that is essential to a teaching institution. 

ORIGINAL ENDOWMENT GIVEN BY FOUNDER IN 1880, DR. JOSEPH W. TAYLOR OF BURLINGTON,, 

NEW JERSEY 

Ground = 46 acres at $500 per acre $23,000.00 

(Present value at $10,000 per acre = $460,000.) 
Buildings: 

Taylor Hall (Academic Building) built in 1884 at a cost of 121,199.05 

Merion Hall (Dormitory) built in 1885 at a cost of 81,986. 75 

Old Gymnasium (now torn down and rebuilt) cost 17,000.00 

Radnor Hall (Dormitory) built in 1888 at a cost of 55,675.21 

Denbigh Hall (Dormitory) built in 1892 at a cost of 80,723 . 15 

Pembroke Hall West (Dormitory) built in 1896 at a cost of 86,147 .43 

Pembroke Hall East (Dormitory) built in 1897 at a cost of 89,431 .00 

Cartref (former President's house) 16,600.00' 

Books for the Library, academic equipment, lecture room furniture, laboratory equip- 
ment, houses later torn down and re-built, etc 201,108.72 

Founder's Endowment 391,700.00 

Total given by Founder $1,164,571 .31 



124 The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly [November 

GIFTS TO THE COLLEGE FOR BUILDINGS 

In 1893: 

From friends and alumnae : 

Dalton Hall (Scientific Laboratories) built in 1893 at a cost of $71,605 .00 

In 1901: 

From John D. Rockefeller: 

Central Power plant with thermostatic controlled heating, electric lighting, 

and plumbing, built in 1903 at a cost of 213,354.00 

In 1901: 

From John D. Rockefeller: 

Rockefeller Hall (Dormitory) built in 1904 at a cost of 247,053 . 00 

Yielding income of about 4 per cent without allowance for deterioration of 
building and equipment $10,560 .00 

(This income is applied to the running expenses of the library and is thus a 
form of endowment.) 
In 1901: 
From Friends and Alumnae: 

Library, built in 1907, at a cost of 318,971 .00 

(To secure above gifts from John D. Rockefeller.) 
In 1906: 
From Mary Elizabeth Garrett: 

The Deanery (President's House) completely rebuilt and furnished 129,953 .00 

In 1909: 

From Students and Alumnae: 

New Gymnasium built in 1909 at a cost of 38,465.00 

In 1910: 

From Cynthia Wesson of the Class of 1909 : 

For Swimming Pool 7,614 . 00 

In 1913: 

From the Class of 1905 = $25,268; Mary Elizabeth Garrett, = $15,000; and Col- 
lege Income, $6,889. 

For 1905 Infirmary 47,157.00 

In 1913: 

From Mary Elizabeth Garrett = $13,928.04; from College Income = $3,413.46: 

To build two professors' houses, Trefa and Aelwyd 17,341 . 50 

Between 1906 and 1919: 
From Students and Alumnae: 

For Students' Building 27,217.00 

Total Gifts For Buildings $1,118,730.50 



GIFTS TO THE COLLEGE FOR ENDOWMENT 

In 1908: 

From the Alumnae Association: 

To Endow Charlotte Angas Scott Alumnae Chair of Mathematics $100,000 . 00 

(The income from this fund amounting to $4500 is applied each year to rais- 
ing the salaries of 9 full professors from $2500 to $3000.) 
In 1910: 

From General Education Board $250,000.00 

In 1910: 

From Alumnae Association 150,000 . 00 

For Academic Endowment (to secure above $250,000 gift. All 
contributions from parents or relations of alumnae whether ob- 
tained by the President of the College or by individual alumnae 
were credited to the Alumnae Association Endowment.) 



1919] Answers to Financial Questions 125 

In 1910: 

From Executors of Phebe Anna Thorne: 

For Endowment of Phebe Anna Thome Model School $150,000.00 

($100,000 of this amount to secure the above $250,000 gift.) 

Total 1910 Endowment $550,000.00 

In 1910: 

To pay off deficits of College from 1885 to 1910 = $169,723 . 00 

(Obtained by President Thomas for this purpose in order to secure above $250,000 

gift.) 
(These deficits included $36,200 paid for the Kennedy property lying between the 
Deanery and Penygroes in 1896 and several professors' houses the cost of which 
was counted as part of the deficits of the College.) 
In 1911: 

Legacy from Justus C. Strawbridge, Trustee of the College $10,000.00 

In 1912: 

From the Estate of Carola Woerishoffer of the Class of 1907 : 

Unrestricted Legacy 750,000.00 

In 1914: 

Proceeds of May Day Fete of 1914: 

For Endowment 2,600.00 

In 1916: 

Legacy from Albert K. Smiley, Trustee of the College 1,000. 00 

In 1916: 

Legacy from Elizabeth S. Shippen of Philadelphia 158,782 .00 

In 1917: 

From George Everett Haskell: 

To Endow the Margaret Kingsland Haskell Chair of English Composition 100,000 . 00 

(Still in the hands of trustees appointed by Mr. Haskell.) 
In 1918: 

From Alumnae Association 100,000 . 00 

To Endow the Mary Elizabeth Garrett Alumnae Chair of English. 
(Still in the hands of the Alumnae Association. This income is used annually to 
raise the salaries of 8 associate professors from $2000 to $2500.) 
From 1895 to 1918: 
For Fellowships and Scholarships Endowments: 

From Alumnae Association (James E. Rhoads Scholarships); from Maria 
Hopper legacy (Maria Hopper Scholarships) ; from pupils of Maria L. East- 
man (Maria L. Eastman Brooke Hall Scholarship) ; from Mrs. J. Campbell 
Harris (Anna M. Powers Scholarship); from Colonial Dames (Elizabeth 
Duane Gillespie Scholarship); from pupils of Mary E. Stevens (Mary E. 
Stevens Scholarship) ; from Mrs. Woerishoffer (Anna M. Ottendorfer Me- 
morial Research Fellowship; from Dr. Anna Howard Shaw and Miss Lucy 
E. Anthony (Susan B. Anthony Memorial Scholarship in Political Theory); 
from the family of Anna Hallo well (Anna Hallo well Scholarship); from 
Alexander Simpson, Jr. (Frances Marion Simpson Scholarship) ; from Eliza- 
beth S. Shippen (Elizabeth Shippen Scholarships); from anonymous donor 
(Helen Schaeffer Huff Memorial Research Fellowship); from George W. 
Kendrick, Jr. (Minnie Murdock Kendrick Memorial Scholarship). Total. . 105,500.00 

From 1895 to 1916: 
For the purchase of books for the library: 

From trustees and friends of President James E. Rhoads; Class of 1902; friends 
of Rose Chamberlain; friends of Lois Meta Wright; legacy of Associate Pro- 
fessor Nettie Maria Stevens; Emily Crane Russell 6,050.00 

Total Gifts for Endowment for Academic and General Expenses $1,883,932 .00 

Balance of Founder's Endowment Invested in Securities 391,700.00 

Total $2,275,632.00 



126 The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly [November 

Difference Between Cost and Par Value of Securities in which Above Endow- 
ment Funds are Invested $97,487 .75 

Total Endowment Funds $2,373.119.75 

[After adding the $100,000 for the Mary Elizabeth Garrett Memorial Alumnae Chair of English 
(which is still in the hands of the Trustees of the Alumnae Association but is here counted as part 
of the endowment) and after deducting the amount accumulated in the Students' Building Fund 
(which equals $27,217) the above Total agrees with the Treasurer's Total of Invested Endowment 
Funds given on page 26 of his Financial Report for the year ending September 30, 1918.] 

INCOME FROM ENDOWMENT FUNDS 

The annual Income received on above invested Endowment equals $107,273 .59 

(Average rate = 4| per cent.) 
Income received on Principal Funds invested in College Dormitories in the year 

1917-18 46,583 .06 

This income is used each year for general and academic expenses. 

(On account of the pressing needs of the College it has proved impossible to 

set aside any part of this income for depreciation of buildings and equipment. 

During the four years of the war only absolutely necessary repairs have been 

made and the buildings are now in a serious condition of disrepair.) 

Total Annual Income from Endowments Invested in Securities and Dormitories Available 

for General and Specified Purposes Including Scholarships in the Year 1917-18 was $153,856 . 65 

GIFTS TO THE COLLEGE FOR ACADEMIC PURPOSES 

Given on the condition that expenditure shoidd be for academic purposes only and not for buildings 

and grounds. 
Between 1886 and 1915: 

From Mary Elizabeth Garrett $291,118.96 

In addition to gifts for the Deanery, Professors' Houses and Infirmary amounting to $158,881.04, 
mentioned among the gifts for buildings, gifts were received from Miss Garrett for academic purposes 
amounting to $291,118.96 including an annual gift of $10,000 for academic purposes for the twenty- 
two years from 1894 to 1915 inclusive. 

CAROLA WOERISHOFFER ENDOWMENT 

Including the Carola Woerishoffer Department Which Opened in October, 1915. 
Carola Woerishoffer Endowment, $750,000.00 

(First Income Received in 1912) 
Income 

1912-13 $22,044. 14 

1913-14 31,038.93 

1914-15 31,036.93 

1915-16 31,115.36 

1916-17 31,115.32 

1917-18 31,115.33 

Total $177,466.01 

Cost of Carola Woerishoffer Department 1915-18 
Cost 

1915-16 $6,252.29 

1916-17 5,287 .29 

1917-18 9,826.87 

Total $21,366.45 

Income of Carola Woerishoffer Endowment that has been applied to other 

academic purposes from 1912 to 1918 $156,099.56 

Annual Income of Carola Woerishoffer Endowment $31,115.33 



1919] Answers to Financial Questions 127 

Total cost of Carola Woerishoffer Department when it reached its maximum cost 

in 1917-18 $9,826.87 

For other Academic Purposes in 1917-18 $21,288.46 

Percentage of Income in 1917-18 used for Carola Woerishoffer Department = 31.6 
Percentage of Income in 1917-18 used for other Academic Purposes = 68.4 

INCREASE OF TEACHING SALARIES 

Professors, Associate Professors, Associates, Lecturers, Instructors, Readers, and Demonstrators. 
{Salaries of Presidents and Deans not Included) 

From 1911-12 (before Receipt of Carola Woerishoffer Legacy) to 1919-20 From Pre- War Basis 

to Past War Basis 

Salary List in 1911-12 {for above persons) Salary List in 1919-20 {for above persons) 

13 Full Professors (11 at $3000) (2 25 Full Professors $73,250.00 

at $2500) $38,000 . 00 10 Half Associate Professors 25,450 . 00 

10 Associate Professors 21,000.00 5 Associates 8,000.00 

6 Half Associates 10,500 . 00 12 Lecturers and Instructors 19,750 . 00 

20 Half Lecturers and Readers .... 20,950 . 00 3 Readers 1,900 . 00 

2 Demonstrators 1,600.00 3 Demonstrators and 2 Half 

2 Half Readers 520.00 Demonstrators 4,200.00 

Total $92,570.00 Total $132,550.00 

Numbers of persons = 53 (Two half persons Number of persons = 59| 

counting as one.) 

Increase of teachers between 1911 and 1919 = 3£ (excluding three teachers belonging to the 
Carola Woerishoffer Department.) 

During these 7 years 11 members of the faculty who were not Full Professors in 1911-12 have 
been promoted to be Full Professors in 1919-20, only two full professors having been called to the 
college during this period. (Professors Gray and Kingsbury.) 

Increases in salaries of all teachers between 1911-12 and 1919-20, equals $39,980.00 which is an 
average increase of a little over 43 per cent. 

Of this total increase of $39,980, $4000 is paid from the Mary Elizabeth Garrett Memorial Alumnae 
Chair Endowm^it of $100,000 which is applied to raising the salaries of Associate Professors from 
$2000 to $2500;" 'and $3000 is paid from the Margaret Kingsland Haskell Endowment of $100,000. 
The remaining $32,980 is paid from the Carola Woerishoffer Endowment and the Elizabeth S. 
Shippen Endowment. As the number of students is stationary and has not increased between 1911 
and 1919 there is no other source of revenue except income from endowment funds. 

Average Salary paid in 1911-12 $1,746 . 61 Average Salary paid in 1919-20 $2,227 . 75 

Percentage of increase of average salary = 26.4 per cent 

Percentage of Increase in Average Salary of all Teachers Receiving less than a $3000 Full Professors' 

Salary between 1911 and 1919. 

Average Salary of all Teachers re- Average Salary of all Teachers re- 

ceiving less than $3000 in 1911-12 $1,423 . 10 ceiving less than $3000 in 1919-20 $1,862 .03 

Percentage of increase in 7 years = 30 . 9 per cent 
A comparison of the salary roll in 1911-12 with the salary roll in 1919-20 shows that the salaries 
of all teachers who were not receiving a full professors salary of $3000 in 1911-12 and are still con- 
nected with the college will be increased in 1919-20 on an average of 43? per cent. As the Carola 
Woerishoffer Department did not open until 1915 no salaries of this department are included. 

This 43^ per cent increase includes only $650 chargeable to the Mary Elizabeth Garrett Memorial 
Alumnae Chair of English Endowment. All other increases have been paid from Endowment 
Funds of the College. 



128 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly [November 



COLLEGE DEFICITS 



(In 1910 all College Deficits were paid of but before the income of the 1910 Endowment of $550,000 
became available fresh deficits, amounting to $33,335.58, had been incurred.) 



SURPLUS 

1910 

1911 

1912 $4,867.60 

1913 

1914 

1915 

1916 3,930.51 

1917 

1918 7,149.78 



DEFICIT 

$22,121.93 
11,213.65 

7,354.50 
1,808.09 
7,139.31 

1,787.60 



$15,947.19 51,425.08 

Net Deficit 35,477.19 

This deficit has been reduced by part of the income from the Margaret Kingsland 

Haskell Endowment Fund with the approval of Mr. Haskell 2,172 .52 

Present Deficit $33,304.67 

(Provided it should be necessary to pay off the above deficit in order to obtain a 
gift from the General Education Board the President of the College has offered 
to assume the investments of College Income in the Infirmary amounting to 

$6,889 and in two professors' houses amounting to $3,413.46) 10,302.46 

The Deficit up to September 30, 1918 that must be paid off will then amount to $23,002 .21 

To this must be added the deficit to be incurred in the current year which is estimated 

at about 30,000.00 

Total Estimated Deficit up to September 30, 1919 $53,002 .21 

There is also a debt of $9547.30 that has been incurred for the Model School to meet which $1000 
a year has been set aside from the Phebe Anna Thorne Fund. Provision having been made for 
payment this debt is not counted among the deficits of the College. 



ROSE SIDGWICK MEMORIAL 
FELLOWSHIP 

To make closer the bonds of friendship and 
understanding between England and America, 
and to commemorate the services of one who 
gave up her life in this cause, it is proposed to 
establish in the United States a fellowship in 
memory of Rose Sidgwick, of the British Edu- 
cational Mission to America, who died in New 
York City on December 28, 1918. 

During the tour of American colleges and 
universities which she had just concluded, 
Miss Sidgwick had everywhere left a deep im- 
pression of her gentle and lovable personality, 
her open-minded eagerness to learn, her ready 
enthusiasm for all that was good in American 
education, and her fine expression of the highest 
type of English scholarship. Her American 
friends desire to found a lasting tribute to her 
character and services, and in so doing to carry 
on the work in which she died. 



At a meeting held at the Women's University 
Club in New Y'ork City on February 15, 1919, 
a committee was organized to secure the neces- 
sary money and establish this fellowship. Not 
less than $25,000 will be required. It is expected 
that the fund will be entrusted to the care of a 
permanent institute for international educational 
relations shortly to be opened in New York City. 
The fellowship will be awarded annually to an 
English woman, for a year of graduate study in 
an American college or university. 

In a letter from the British Embassy in Wash- 
ington, dated January 17, 1919, Sir Henry 
Babington Smith, British High Commissioner, 
states that he feels that nothing could be more 
in accord with the aims which Miss Sidgwick 
had in view or more appropriate as a memorial 
to her work than the establishment of a fellow- 
ship to be given annually to an English woman 
for graduate study in America. "The British 
Educational Mission," he writes, "had, I 
believe, become convinced that one of the most 



1919] 



Professor George Barton: An Appreciation 



129 



effectual aids for furthering the development of 
closer relations of our two countries would be 
the creation of facilities for the interchange of 
post-graduate students, such as those that would 
be given by your scheme." 
The committee asks your aid in creating this 



tribute to an English scholar and bond between 
the English-speaking peoples. 

Checks should be made payable to "The Rose 
Sidgwick Memorial Fund" and sent to the 
treasurer, Miss Mabel Choate, 8 East 63d Street, 
New York City. 



PROFESSOR GEORGE BARTON: AN APPRECIATION 

The beauty of a human life 

Is seen when all one's daily tasks, — 
The grave, the trivial, tedious, hard, — 

Are ting d with more than duty asks. 
When kindliness and sympathy 

For every other human's need, 
With friendship's highest loyalty 

A heart of understanding gives. 
The Perfect Personality 

Is made more real because he lives. 

— Beatrice Allard. 



Biographical Sketch 

George Aaron Barton was born in East Farn- 
ham in the Province of Quebec, Canada, No- 
vember 12, 1859. For his undergraduate course 
he attended Haverford College at Haverford, 
Pennsylvania, under the control of the Society 
of Friends whose acknowledged minister he 
became in August 1879. He received his bache- 
lor's degree from Haverford in 1882. 

The next year he spent in business in Boston, 
Mass., where he married Caroline Brewer Dan- 
forth in 1884. From 1884 to 1889 he taught 
mathematics and classics in the Friends' School 
at Providence, R. I. In 1890 he received from 
Harvard University the degree of A.M. and in 
1891 that of Ph.D. In 1891 he was appointed 
Professor of Biblical Literature and Semitic 
Languages at Bryn Mawr College. For four 
years he was also lecturer on Biblical Languages 
at Haverford College. 

In 1902-03 he was given leave of absence 
from Bryn Mawr to accept the year's director- 
ship of the American School of Oriental Research 
in Jerusalem which had recently been opened. 
In 1912-13 he was President of the Society of 
Biblical Literature and Exegesis; in 1916-17, 
President of the American Oriental Society. In 
1914 Haverford College conferred on him the 
degree of LL.D. 

Facts like these one can gain from the pages 
of Who's Who or of similar publications. But 
to those of us who have known Professor Barton 
during the period of his work at Bryn Mawr, 



such a list of facts, although supplemented by 
the long list of learned societies of which he is 
a member, and by the far longer list of his 
published books and articles leaves much unsaid. 
We know from many a chapel talk, many a 
chance reference in the class room, that although 
Professor Barton was a Canadian by the acci- 
dent of birth, his naturalization as a citizen of 
the United States but gave legal sanction to 
his love for his chosen country, her traditions, 
and institutions. We know that those degrees 
from Harvard stand for far more than definite 
courses taken and dissertation written, for we 
have watched eagerly but in vain for some 
class question to lead him into a field which he 
had not previously explored. 

We know that those hours spent in the Bryn 
Mawr class rooms have done far more than 
impart useful facts. Perhaps we think most 
often of the course which we named for him 
"Christian Barton," of the breadth of outlook, 
illuminated (never obscured) by his insistence 
on accuracy of historical detail; of his sympathy 
and understanding of the manifold ways by 
which from his beginning man has sought his 
God. That same power of understanding sym- 
pathy has since made it possible for the man 
who had been so long minister of the Society 
of Friends to become in 1918 a deacon of the 
Episcopal Church. 

There are those of us who were never in his 
class room, of whose memories of Bryn Mawr 
he is no less a part, — Dr. Barton leading chapel 
Thursday morning, giving us a glimpse of the 



130 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly [November 



possibilities of communion with God; Dr. Bar- 
ton sitting in the tiny office by the Library 
door at noon time waiting to clear up our diffi- 
culties, — or just Dr. Barton walking up the hill 
for his mail with the two dogs trotting at his 
heels, or a few years later with Rhoda running 
ahead, clamoring to be taken to see the "fisses 
in the fountain" in the library cloister. 

But whether we know him much or little, we 
can all say of him that to him it has indeed 
been granted "to study filled with reverence 
and to pursue truth with fearlessness;" that he 
has been "empowered continually to extend the 
boundaries of knowledge;" that he has been 
"made wise with that wisdom which comes to 
the soul when it is alone with God," that he 
has been "strong to engage in that prophetic 
service which is to make the kingdoms of the 
world the kingdom of our Lord and Saviour 
Jesus Christ." (Bryn Mawr Service Book, p. 8.) 

May he for many years to come aid in fulfilling 
at Bryn Mawr the prayer which he wrote for 
our college. 

Louise Pettibone Smith, 1908. 

George Barton in the Service of Bryn Mawr College 

In the current volume of Who's Who in 
America, among the numerous titles of honour 
that have come to George Barton, one reads 
"prof. Bibl. lit. and Semitic langs., Bryn Mawr 
Coll., since 1891." In October 1919, therefore, 
he is beginning his twenty-ninth year of service 
to the college. It is a long period — longer than 
that of any other member of the teaching staff 
except Professor Scott. But these years mean 
more than mere length of service. George Bar- 
ton came to Bryn Mawr at the age of thirty-two, 
and the dates of his publications and of the 
many posts which he has held in learned societies 
and other organizations show that at Bryn Mawr 
he has done not only most of his work but the 
most effective part of it — the work by which 
he has achieved his name as a scholar. Bryn 
Mawr has indeed profited by the best period 
of his life. It is of this period, or such part of 
it as I know from personal observation, that 
I am privileged to write. 

There are many more ways in which members 
of a college faculty may serve the institution 
than the outside world realizes. The professor's 
obvious function is teaching, and if he is in the 
full sense of the term a good teacher and 
nothing more, he serves the college well. George 
Barton may lay claim with the best of rights to 



the title of good teacher; the students whom 
he has trained are sufficient proof of his effective- 
ness. Moreover, as college teaching goes, he 
has displayed exceptional breadth and versa- 
tility. It is not my purpose to give a detailed 
account of the courses which he has offered, 
but a mere enumeration of the subjects in 
which he works is impressive: various courses 
in Oriental History and. in the Old and New 
Testament (including New Testament Greek), 
the History of Religions; Christian Doctrine, 
several branches of Oriental Archaeology, He- 
brew, Sumerian, Assyrian, Arabic, Aramaic, 
Syriac, Ethiopic, and Egyptian. And he has 
had no assistant; he alone is the Department 
of Semitic Languages and Biblical Literature. 
No wonder that we of the Bryn Mawr faculty 
often speak of George Barton as "several depart- 
ments rolled into one." And it is safe to say 
that scholars of such varied attainments are 
rare even in the Semitic field, where languages 
seem to be as plentiful as blueberries on a New 
England mountain. Certainly the college has 
been fortunate in having in its service one who 
could do and has done the work of several 
teachers. 

One may be a good teacher even though he 
has neither the taste for research nor the incli- 
nation to publish anything in the nature of 
scholarly work. And yet a good teacher whose 
published work is known beyond the walls of 
the college with which he is connected achieves 
thereby a higher standing in his profession. 
Such a man is George Barton, whose activity 
and versatility as a productive scholar are at- 
tested by the bibliography published elsewhere 
in this issue of the Alumnae Quarterly. The 
work of a specialist can never be adequately 
appraised except by other specialists in the 
same field and such appraisal I must leave to 
others, but it is proper for me to say that it 
is not the least of a professor's services to his 
college that he increases its prestige by means 
of his recognized achievements as a specialist. 
It is doubtful whether anybody who has ever 
been a member of the faculty has done so much 
to increase Bryn Mawr's reputation in this 
particular way as George Barton. He is known 
wherever biblical and Semitic studies are known, 
and this means that his reputation is not con- 
fined to the United States. 

It is an acknowledgment of a professor's suc- 
cess to say that he is a good teacher and that 
he has made a name for himself as a scholar, 
but even from a purely professorial point of 



1919] 



Professor George Barton: An Appreciation 



131 



view this is far from being all that can be said 
of George Barton. There are many duties of 
a professor in a college or university which 
have little or nothing to do with his work as 
teacher or scholar. "Committee work" is the 
bugaboo of the professor's life, for it makes 
serious inroads into the precious time that 
might be given to writing or research. Never- 
theless the routine work of a college faculty 
must be done by somebody. Theoretically a 
fair proportion is assigned to every member 
of the faculty, but in practice the heaviest 
committee work has a habit of falling to the 
lot of a few, and George Barton has for many 
years been prominent among the elect. He 
has of course been a member of the Council, 
which supervises the graduate work, and of the 
Senate, of which he is the secretary. He has 
served on every important committee of these 
bodies as well as on those of the general faculty 
— often on half a dozen at least in a single year. 
The chief reason for the imposition of many of 
these tasks upon him is that "he is a good man 
to have on a committee," as his colleagues 
would say. He seems to have an instinctive 
insight into a problem and he possesses a hyper- 
New England conscience (he was born just above 
the border!) which renders it impossible for him 
to shirk a duty. When one adds that he has 
courage, an excellent memory for details, a gift 
of lucid expression, and a suavity which falls 
like oil on the troubled waters of debate, one 
realizes why the faculty so often elects him, to 
the great detriment, no doubt, of Semitic studies, 
but at the same time to the great profit of the 
college. What irony that the assignment of so 
much hard work should involve a compliment! 

In truth George Barton, were he not a good 
college professor, could undoubtedly be a good 
business man. The same qualities which he 
has displayed in the college organization are 
valuable assets in the business world. He is 
shrewd, he has unusual ability to forecast events, 
he reaches a decision quickly and is prompt to 
act. In him are united to an exceptional degree 
the characteristics of the scholar and the practi- 
cal man which render him an admirable Faculty 
Representative on the Board of Directors, and 
he has held one of these posts ever since they 
were created. To us who know him it seems 
perfectly natural that other organizations also 
of which he is a member have found him a useful 
man in the conduct of their affairs. 

I have said enough to indicate that George 
Barton is a very busy man. How he accom- 



plishes so much is a puzzle to his friends. Never- 
theless in addition to his teaching, his research, 
his committee work within and without the 
college, he has performed still another service 
which no other member of the faculty is quali- 
fied to render — that of conducting the morning 
exercises in chapel. How much of his time 
this one duty has consumed nobody knows. 
Many institutions maintain a college pastor to 
do such work, but it is characteristic of the sect 
to which for so many years he belonged and of 
the man himself that he has done it without 
remuneration and without complaint. The 
change wrought in his religious convictions by 
the great world-conflict — a change which but 
increases ones respect for him — has not affected 
this devoted service, and it must receive a 
prominent place among the many obligations 
of the college to him. 

Personally I have a great respect for George 
Barton as a farmer, but I fear that an account 
of my association with him in this capacity 
would indeed take the reader far afield, and 
perhaps, too, my own ignorance inclines me to 
exaggerate his ability in this direction. I hope 
so, for I like to believe that there is something 
that he does not know well; it would make him 
somehow even more human than he is. I have 
alluded to the subject, however, because our 
work upon the little war farm on the Bryn Mawr 
campus in 1917 gave me the opportunity of 
knowing him in another guise — in overalls, in 
fact. You cannot doctor potatoes or hoe corn 
and beans with a man day after day without 
coming to know him more intimately. And so 
as we sweltered over the pesky weeds in that 
garden with the thermometer often ninety in 
the shade, we found George Barton always 
good-humoured, always ready to cheer us on to 
the end of those interminable rows with story 
after story. 

And this is the man, on duty and off, — quiet, 
even-tempered, humorous, one whom you re- 
spect and one whom you can trust. If there 
is a knotty problem to discuss, he may differ 
with you in his quietly incisive way, but you 
do not have to guard against rough edges in 
his character; it has none. You may talk with 
the utmost freedom, and whether you convince 
him or not, you are always aware of his fairness 
and his sympathy. 

It is pleasant to know that his sixtieth birth- 
day finds George Barton with his powers still 
unimpaired, still able to work at the studies 



132 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly [November 



he loves. Let us repeat the Roman poet's 
prayer, 

at tu, Natalis, multos celebrande per annos, 
candidior semper candidiorque veni. 
Arthur Leslie Wheeler. 

George Aaron Barton: An Appreciation 

BY 

Morris Jasirow, Jr. 

Professor Barton's scholarly activity which 
began in 1890 with an article in the Journal 
of the American Oriental Society on "Tiamat," 
the mythical monster of Babylonia that became 
the symbol of primaeval chaos, coincides with 
the period in which American scholarship within 
the Semitic field took an upward leap.* This 
leap was due to three factors (1) the reaction 
upon Semitic studies of the general movement 
in this country for more intensive and more 
methodical research which may be dated from 
the founding of the Johns Hopkins University, 
standing from its inception for advanced gradu- 
ate work; (2) the stimulus exerted by German 
scholarship upon a group of younger men who 
had received their philological training at Ger- 
man universities and (3) the energetic efforts of 
a single man — the late William Rainey Harper 
in arousing an interest in Hebrew studies in 
this country, which spread with Dr. Harper's 
acceptance of the presidency of the newly- 
founded University of Chicago (1891) from 
Eastern colleges to those of the Middle West.f 

While Professor Barton himself did not pursue 
studies at German universities, he came under 
the influence of the second factor through his 
distinguished teachers at Harvard University, 
the late Professor C. H. Toy and Professor D. G. 
Lyon. Professor Toy, whose range of knowl- 
edge was as wide as it was deep, had in his 
maturer years interrupted his teaching activi- 
ties in order to supplement his earlier training 
by a period of uninterrupted study in Germany, 
the results of which showed itself in his subse- 
quent work. It was no small privilege for Pro- 
fessor Barton to receive his training and introduc- 
tion to Semitic studies under a master who, up to 
the time when failing health forced his retire- 

* See for a general survey Peters and Jastrow in Thirty 
Years of Oriental Studies, published by the Oriental Club 
of Philadelphia (Philadelphia, 1918). 

t See the excellent sketch of President Harper's career 
by the late Francis Brown in Old Testament and Semitic 
Studies in Memory of William Rainey Harper (University 
of Chicago Press , 1906), Vol. 1, pp. xiii-xxxiii. 



ment, was easily the peer of American Semitists 
and whom his colleagues gladly and proudly 
hailed as their Nestor. J His departure leaves 
a void that cannot be filled, for Professor Toy 
in addition to his scholarly productivity in 
Semitics became the pioneer in this country for 
the historical Study of Religions — securing a 
place for himself by the side of Max Miiller 
and E. B. Tylor of Oxford, Eugene Burnouf 
and Albert Reville of Paris, and C. P. Tiele 
of Leiden, to whom we owe the inauguration 
of a scientific method in the study of religious 
phenomena. Professor Lyon, who shares with 
Professor Haupt of the Johns Hopkins the dis- 
tinction of having introduced the study of 
Assyriology in this country, is a pupil of the 
famous Friedrich Delitzsch, now of the Uni- 
versity of Berlin, who has the proud satisfaction 
of having trained the larger number of present 
day Assyriologists. 

We can see in Professor Barton's work the 
influence exerted upon him by these two men. 
Through Professor Toy he received that wide 
grasp of the general problems involved in the 
study of Semitic civilizations which is one of 
Professor Barton's distinguishing characteristics, 
while through Professor Lyon he acquired the 
sober method and the sure touch in Assyrian 
studies which kept him from indulging in vagar- 
ies to which students of Assyriology (in Germany 
as well as elsewhere) seem particularly prone, 
perhaps by reason of the comparative newness of 
the science. From both he received the spirit 
of devotion to research and of patient plodding, 
without which no results of an enduring quality 
in research can be achieved. To this spirit he 
added from his natural endowment and through 
home influences an idealism which is an essential 
ingredient in the equipment of the true scholar 
and which has enabled him to surmount diffi- 
culties that would have discouraged a less 
enthusiastic and less noble nature. It is a sad 
commentary on intellectual conditions in this 
country, that the life of the scholar, inspired 
by high ideals, is beset with obstacles which 
are only slowly yielding to a more general appre- 
ciation of the services which scholars, working 
in fields that lie away from the high road of 
material progress, are rendering in raising the 
general intellectual standards and in adding to 

t See the minute on Professor Toy's career prepared 
by Messrs Lyon, Jewett, and Robinson of the Harvard 
faculty, after his death on May 12, 1919. A full account 
of Professor Toy's career, prepared by Prof Geo. F. Moore, 
appeared in the American Journal of Semitic Languages 
in October, 1919, pp. 1-17. 



1919] 



Professor George Barton: An Appreciation 



133 



the treasury of human knowledge. In the mad 
rush for wealth and for the immediate appli- 
cation of discoveries to practical ends, the 
scholar whose tasks carry him to bygone ages 
may be pardoned for feeling lonely and neg- 
lected. Science for science's sake appears to 
be "academic," and until we detach from 
"academic" the current connotation of some- 
thing that is to be avoided, there can be no 
true appreciation of scholarship in the highest 
sense, which is at the same time the truest sense. 
Progress measured purely in material advance 
is not enduring; indeed one may go further and 
say that it is not genuine. Material results 
should be incidental to progress — not the essen- 
tial aim. Of what value is it to man to gain 
the world, if he thereby loses his soul? The 
enduring achievements of the past cannot be 
translated into coin — the literary masterpieces, 
the works of art, the immortal musical com- 
positions, and to which we may properly add 
the results of scholarship which become part 
of the heritage of the world. By these achieve- 
ments an age is judged before the tribunal of 
history, and the final verdict rendered. It was 
not only to acquire learning and scholarly 
method that students flocked from all parts of 
the world to German universities, but to acquire 
that idealistic devotion to scholarly pursuits 
which should go with knowledge, and for which 
Germany at one time provided the most con- 
genial atmosphere. 

The scholar in order to achieve the best 
results must live in a congenial atmosphere, 
which means that he must be relieved so far 
as possible from the mere struggle for existence. 
The popular notion that a scholar's life is an 
easy and indulgent one is as far from the truth 
as any statement can possibly be. Renan once 
said la Science est roturiere — "scholarship is 
hard labor." We are beginning to recognize 
in this country that our scholars at our colleges 
and universities must be placed in a position 
where the mind can work freely, without being 
hampered by the constant care and worry to 
make ends meet — ends that are too short to 
be capable of meeting. It is, therefore, in 
itself an index of the unusual qualities possessed 
by Professor Barton that under conditions which 
have been the rule (though there have been 
notable exceptions) at American colleges during 
the last thirty years, he should now be able 
to look back upon such a notable array of 
achievements as is illustrated by the Bibliog- 
raphy attached to this attempt at an appre- 



ciation of his career. The Bibliography speaks 
for itself and all that a colleague, who feels 
the debt which all of us working in the same 
field owe to Professor Barton, can do is to point 
out to a more general public the distinguishing 
features of his work. 

One is struck in the first place by the wide 
range of Professor Barton's researches — Assyri- 
ology in all its ramifications, Old Testament and 
New Testament criticism, Hebrew philology and 
archaeology, Phoenician inscriptions, Hittite lore, 
Islam, and general Semitic culture, and the large 
field of the historical study of religions. Ex- 
cluding the large number of smaller articles 
and groups of articles in technical and popular 
journals, the Bibliography includes fifteen sub- 
stantial volumes which may be taken as illustra- 
tions of his method and of his indefatigable 
industry. Among these the first place is to 
be assigned to the five volumes of Cuneiform 
Texts, three volumes from the Haverford col- 
lection and two from the rich collections in 
the University of Pennsylvania. These vol- 
umes represent a mass of original material, 
which of itself is sufficient to ensure for Professor 
Barton a permanent place as one of the most 
productive of American scholars. The texts 
are all in Sumerian, which is the non-Semitic 
speech of ancient Babylonia, brought thither 
by the Sumerian settlers who at an early period, 
the exact date of which still lies beyond our 
knowledge, came to the Euphrates Valley and 
became for many centuries the controlling ele- 
ment. Through Sumerian texts we are able to 
reach down to the oldest stratum of Euphrates 
culture. Only those who have themselves 
worked in this field can appreciate the enormous 
difficulties involved in copying and interpreting 
the Sumerian material which is constantly turn- 
ing up through excavations in the older and 
oldest centres of settlement in the southern part 
of the Euphrates Valley. 

The Babylonian language — the name given to 
the Semitic speech of Babylonia and Assyria, 
spoken by Semites who in the third millennium 
B.C. began to displace the Sumerians as 
rulers — is now quite familiar to scholars so 
that the decipherment of a Babylonian text 
does not occasion much difficulty. The study 
of Sumerian, however, is of more recent date, 
and Professor Barton by his publication of 
the first volume of the Haverford collection 
of Cuneiform Tablets fourteen years ago is 
to be ranked among the pioneers of this study 
in this country. Each succeeding volume 



134 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly [November 



issued by him showed a surer touch in copying 
the intricate and often blurred as well as minute 
characters. Difficult as the copying of these 
texts is, requiring long and constant practice 
before accuracy can be attained, the real test 
of a scholar's ability comes with his interpreta- 
tion. It is through such interpretation when 
successfully carried out that valuable contribu- 
tions to knowledge are made. Only by extra- 
ordinary patience, combined with ingenuity 
which, however, must be kept within bounds 
so as to prevent vagaries and pure guesswork, 
can definite results be reached. Professor Bar- 
ton in his Sumerian researches has fulfilled the 
necessary conditions. Many points in Sumerian 
grammar and in the readings of Sumerian signs 
have been clarified by him, and while he would 
be the last to claim that his translations of 
Sumerian texts are in all cases final — for he 
possesses the modesty and self-criticism which 
always go with the best scholarship — it may 
truthfully be said that he never discusses a 
difficult passage without making some contri- 
bution towards its clarification. In a field like 
Sumerian the adage dies diem docet becomes 
the motto of progress. Through the combined 
efforts of scholars, one advancing a step further 
by virtue of improving on the work done by 
another, is progress slowly and painfully 
achieved. 

Among the many problems with which the 
student of Cuneiform writing has to deal, the 
origin of the signs is one of the most fascinating, 
as also one of the most puzzling. In this sub- 
division of Assyriology, Professor Barton has 
made a specially important and original contri- 
bution by his work on "The Origin and Develop- 
ment of Babylon Writing" published in two 
parts in 1912-13. (Hinrichs, Leipzig.) This is 
a compilation on a larger scale than had as 
yet been attempted of the various forms which 
the Babylonian signs assumed in passing from 
the oldest to the latest period — a period of 
several thousand years. It is an invaluable 
vademecum which every Assyriologist needs 
to have constantly at his side, an indispensable 
reference book which keeps the name of Barton 
as constantly before him as that of Briinnow — 
another American scholar — to whom we owe 
the classified "List of Cuneiform Ideographs." 
To his lists Professor Barton has added a most 
illuminating discussion of each sign, tracing it 
back to the original picture from which it is de- 
rived. This investigation is the result of many 
years of labor, which together with Delitzsch's 



Ursprung der Keilschriftzeichen (1897) has placed 
the study of the signs on a sound basis. Here 
again final results in all cases cannot be reached, 
but Professor Barton has to his credit the definite 
determination of the original picture in the case 
of more than a majority of the signs, while in 
many other cases his solution is most plausible 
and in the balance worthy of serious consider- 
ation. It is in this work that his wide reading 
in Cuneiform literature and his great ingenuity 
reveal themselves at their best. The work marks 
also an addition to our general knowledge of 
Sumerian-Baby Ionian culture, for the objects 
represented by the signs in their original form 
are an index of the cultural environment which 
produced them. The pictures show the utensils 
used, the animals domesticated, the trees and 
plants cultivated, the means of transportation, 
the structures reared, as well as important ele- 
ments of the cult. 

The originality of this study of Cuneiform 
signs may be said to mark the fulfillment of the 
promise held out by an earlier one, his " Sketch 
of Semitic Origins, Social and Religious," which 
published in 1902 (Macmillans) definitely estab- 
lished Professor Barton's position among con- 
temporary Semitic scholars. Professor Barton 
takes up the problem of Semitic Origins at the 
point where the late Robertson Smith left it in 
his Religion of the Semites, unfortunately not 
completed by the lamented scholar, whose early 
demise was such a serious loss to Oriental schol- 
arship.* In a series of eight chapters, Professor 
Barton unfolds a picture of the development of 
religious ideas among the Semites, together with 
the practices illustrative of these ideas. Perhaps 
in no other work of Professor Barton is the 
influence exerted upon him by his teacher Pro- 
fessor Toy more apparent, for the pupil displays 
the same sympathetic insight into the human 
mind in its endeavor to reach out to an interpre- 
tation of nature and of the phenomena of his 
own being that marked the teacher. The whole 
work may be described as an attempt to get 
behind the facts, gathered from a vast variety 
of sources, and to see what they mean. Among 
the most fruitful results of his study reached by 
the author is the determination of the large part 
played by female deities in early Semitic cults, 
and which the author most ingeniously traces 
to the views associated with fertility. The 
suggestiveness of the book is such that no one 
can read it without having his attention directed 

* See the interesting Life of William Robertson Smith, 
by J. S. Black and George Ckrystal, (Black, London, 1912). 



1919] 



Professor George Barton: An Appreciation 



135 



to many sociological phenomena among the 
Semites which have been overlooked or neglected 
by others. Written in a fluent and most agree- 
able style, it is also a work that makes a general 
appeal. It is perhaps more quoted than any 
other work of Professor Barton, for its impor- 
tance is not limited to those interested in. Semitic 
and general Oriental civilizations. Even today, 
seventeen years after its appearance, it still 
remains the best book on the subject. Apart 
from its intrinsic value it is a notable specimen 
of compact reasoning on the difficult question 
of origins, and an illustration of what can be 
accomplished in the speculative field of sociolog- 
ical archaeology by the application of a sound 
method in combination with wide learning. 

Professor Barton's gift for interpretation as 
well as for expression in a popular and lucid 
style is to be seen in two more recent works, 
likewise of general interest, his Religions of the 
World (University of Chicago Press, 1917) and 
his Religion of Israel (Macmillans, 1918). The 
former is intended as a text-book for University 
and Seminary students. Its small compass of 
some 300 pages does not permit of detailed 
treatment, but to write a small book on a large 
subject is more difficult than to prepare a large 
one. Selection of data requires more knowledge 
than collection. To pick out a part one must 
know the whole. Condensation is generally 
done at the expense of completeness and clear- 
ness, but Professor Barton has performed his 
task so admirably as to give us the very best 
short manual in English, worthy of a place by 
the side of the late Professor Tide's compendium 
of the History of Religions which exists only in 
Dutch and in a German translation. His 
Religion of Israel is likewise a model of con- 
densed writing, with brilliant generalizations on 
the striking features in the unfolding of religious 
thought among the ancient Hebrews. As a last 
illustration of Professor Barton's method, of the 
extraordinary range of his knowledge, growing 
larger with the lapse of years, and of his mar- 
vellous industry which enables him to produce 
more than three average scholars combined, 
I single out his Archaeology and the Bible (Phil- 
adelphia, S. S.Union Press, 1916), which at once 
took its place as the standard because the most 
comprehensive work on the subject, combining 
completeness with accuracy and originality. 
As a mere collection of illustrative material to 
the archaeology of the Old and New Testament, 
drawn from the results of excavations and explo- 
rations in Palestine, Syria, Asia Minor, Mesopo- 



tamia, Egypt, Arabia, and furnishing transla- 
tions of hundreds upon hundreds of longer or 
shorter texts and inscriptions, it is a most note- 
worthy achievement. Its value is increased by 
the incisive discussion of the vast material 
which throws new light on the literature, cus- 
toms, culture and rites of the Hebrews, and illu- 
minates the pages of the Bible in such a manner 
as to present the Biblical books to us as docu- 
ments replete with human interest. Professor 
Barton fitted himself for this task, which per- 
haps no other scholar in this country could have 
performed so well, by his lifelong devotion to the 
critical study of both the Old and the New 
Testament and of which his excellent commen- 
taries on "Job" in the Cambridge Series and 
" Ecclesiastes" in the International Commentary 
Series are further products. 

To have thus given us four works to be 
singled out as productions of standard author- 
ity, his Semitic Origins, his Origin and Devel- 
opment of Babylonian Writing, his Archaeology 
and the Bible and his commentary on "Ecclesi- 
astes" is a record, which apart from his other 
books, his numerous articles and his many 
reviews (not included for lack of space in the 
Bibliography) have given him a rank among 
the Semitic scholars of the day which is at 
once the despair and the joy of his colleagues 
in this country and abroad in whose name I feel 
that I am speaking in paying him a tribute of 
congratulation and of affectionate esteem. I 
have not spoken of his public services through 
popular articles and addresses, or of his activities 
in the religious bodies with which he has been 
affiliated; nor do I feel competent to speak of 
his contributions to the interpretation of the 
books of the New Testament which lies outside 
of my range, but I may be permitted in conclu- 
sion, even at the risk of still further offending 
his innate modesty, to say just a few words of 
the man behind the work. 

As things are in this world, on "this bad little 
planet" as the late Dr. Horace Howard Furness 
was wont to speak of it, great scholarship is not 
always found in harmonious combination with 
great character. Indeed we cannot be at all sure 
that scholarship, as distinct from merely refined 
culture, is always conducive, certainly not 
necessarily conducive, towards the formation of 
strong character. Learning alone does not 
bring out the best traits in one's nature, and I 
have often toyed with the thought of writing 
an essay on "Scholarship and Character" to 
illustrate the temptations besetting the scholar 



136 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly [November 



which endanger his nature and vitiate the 
effectiveness of his work. If vanity follows on 
the heel of achievement, the world may be the 
gainer but the scholar the loser. The scholar's 
life, particularly in this strenuous age, is not as 
seclusive as Longfellow would have us believe. 

"The love of learning, the sequestered nooks 
And all the sweet serenity of books." 

There are other temptations in the world 
besides the greed for wealth. The scholar who 
too ardently seeks the "bubble reputation" may 
receive a moral blow more serious than the 
mortal wound of the soldier who seeks reputa- 
tion " in the cannon's mouth." Edith Wharton's 
pathetic story of The Descent of Man comes as a 
wholesome reminder that compromise in the 
pursuit of wide popularity may lead to worldly 
success with a complete moral downfall at the 
very moment of reaching the pinnacle. The 
world looks to the scholar to set an example of 
unselfish devotion to his task, upon which in the 
long run his influence and his genuine success 
depend. The scholar too has his battles to wage. 
For him also there is a field of honor, and Pro- 
fessor Barton has shown when the occasion 
warranted it that his Quaker ancestry and rear- 
ing did not prevent him from developing 
"fighting blood." When some years ago there 
was a danger of the triumph of trickery and 
dishonesty on the part of a scholar who had 
yielded to the temptation for sensationalism, 
Professor Barton at a great personal sacrifice 
came to the aid of those who were forced to enter 
the distasteful arena of public controversy. 
His exposure of unworthy methods largely 
helped to win the fight, and only those who 
stood close to him know how heavy the sacrifice 
was which he made by his courageous stand for 
the truth. Rewards of his career to which he 
had a right to look forward were snatched from 
him, at least for a time. His attitude on that 
occasion revealed the man. It showed that in 
his case steadily growing scholarship went hand 
in hand with the strengthening of character. 
Worldly considerations had no meaning for him 
when scholarly ideals were involved. 

The tribunal which pronounces the final 
verdict on a scholar is not popular acclaim, but 
the court represented by his immediate col- 
leagues, who through his work come to know 
the man. Professor Barton's sympathetic 
appreciation of the work of others, his tolerant 
attitude towards those with whose views on 
controversial topics he does not find himself in 
agreement, his genial personality seen at its best 



in his intercourse with his colleagues, his wise 
counsel, born of the varied experiences of life — 
these and other traits have gained for him the 
esteem and affection cf his associates, as the 
splendid character of his scholarly work, in- 
volving enduring contributions to the sum of 
human knowledge, shed lustre on the institution 
in whose service he has spent his career. To 
say, as the able and capable acting president of 
Bryn Mawr did the other day, that it is not the 
buildings but those who teach within the build- 
ings that stamp the character of a college or 
University, may appear to be obvious, but it is 
the obvious that is more commonly overlooked 
than the remote. It is necessary to be reminded 
of the obvious. It is obvious that, when the 
occasion presents itself, one should show a 
scholar who has deserved well of his fellow-men, 
that his work is appreciated, but for that reason 
it is all the more gratifying that the occasion 
of reaching his sixtieth milepost should be 
seized by his pupils and friends for paying a 
tribute to Professor Barton in a form which by 
its simplicity and its sincerity, may make it not 
unworthy of him whom it is a delight and a 
privilege to know and to honor. 

A Selected Bibliography of the Publications of 
Professor George A. Barton, Ph.D., LL.D. 

The following bibliography is a selection from 
the list of Dr. Barton's published work from 
1890 to 1918 inclusive. Space is lacking for a 
complete bibliography which would include 
numerous reviews, as well as articles in the 
Hastings' Encyclopaedia of Religion and Ethics, 
the Encyclopaedia Biblica, and the Jewish 
Encyclopaedia. 

Thanks are due to Dean Isabel Maddison for 
her invaluable assistance in the collection of this 
material, the greater part of which was recorded 
in the office of the President, Bryn Mawr College. 
1890 Tiamat, JAOS* XV 1-27, 1890. 

1891-92 Esarhaddon's Account of the Resto- 
ration of Ishtar's Temple at Erech, 
JAOS XV cxxx, 1891. 
Astoreth and her Influence in the Old 
Testament, JBL X 73-91, 1891. 

•List of abbreviations: 
AF, American Friend. 
AJA, American Journal of Archaeology. 
AJSL, American Journal of Semitic Languages. 
AJT, American Journal of Theology. 
BW, Biblical World. 
FR, The Friends' Review. 
JAOS, Journal of the American Oriental Society. 
JBL, Journal of Biblical Literature. 









1919] 



Professor George Barton: An Appreciation 



137 



1892-93 A Peculiar Use of Hani in the Tablets 

from El-Armarna, JAOS XV cxcvi, 

1892. 
On the Ethiopic MS. of the Oct&teuch 

in the Library of Haverford College, 

JAOS XV cxcix, 1892. 
On the Reading t6 vadxa in John VI 4 , 

Haverford College Studies, XI 1-5, 

1892. 
1893-94 The Semitic Ishtar Cult (Doctor's 

Dissertation) , Part I, AJSL IX 131- 

165, 1893. 
Native Israelitish Deities, Oriental 

Studies of the Oriental Club of 

Philadelphia, 86-115, 1894. 
The Gospel of Peter, The Friend's 

Review, Sept. 1893. 
1894-95 The Semitic Ishtar Cult, Part II, 

AJSL X 1-74, 1894. 
On the sacrifices TO and TO UW in 

the Marseilles Phoenician Inscrip- 
tion, JAOS XVI lxvi, 1894. 
Facts about the Bible, a series of 

articles, FR Dec. 1893-June 1894. 
Notes. AJSL X 202-207, 1894. JAOS 

XVI 193, 1894. 

a. On the Semitic Ishtar Cult. 

b. On the God Mut. 

c. Was Ilu ever a Distinct Deity in 
Babylonia? 

On the Interpretation of Shevet 

Sopher in Judges V 14 , read before 

the Society of Biblical Literature 

and Exegesis, Dec. 1894. 
A Plea for a Biblical Training, Report 

of the Quinquennial Conference of 

Friends, 1894. 
1895-96 The Kinship of Gods and Men among 

the Early Semites, read before the 

Society of Biblical Literature, Dec, 

1895. JBL XV, 168-182, 1896. 
1896-97 A Series of Articles on the "Life and 

Letters of Paul," AF 1896. 
Three Exegetical Articles in Faith and 

Works, for July, Aug. and Sept., 

1896. 
Life in Ancient Babylonia, AF 1896. 
1897-98 The Ministry of Women in Church 

and in the Synagogue, AF IV, 25, 

587, June 24, 1897. 
The Province of Scholarship in the 

Interpretation of Scripture, AF IV, 

28, 655, July 15, 1897. 
The Heart of Religion, AF IV, 33, 769, 

770, Aug. 19, 1897. 



The New Logia or Sayings of Jesus, 
AF IV, 34, 793, Aug. 26. 1897. 
1898-99 The Composition of the Book of 
Daniel, JBL XVII, 62-86, Mar., 
1898. 

Following Christ, AF V, 2, 30, 31, 
Jan. 13, 1898. 

The Sufferer, AF V 22, 510-512, June 
2, 1898. 

Apocalypse and Recent Criticism, 
AJT LI 776-801, Oct., 1898. 

The New Covenant, AF V, 42, 985- 
987,. Oct. 20, 1898. 
1899-00 Bearing of the Composition of the 
Psaltar on the Date of the 44th 
Psalm, AJT III, 740-746, Oct., 
1899. 

Note on Meissner's Altbabylonisches 
Privatrecht, No. 7, JAOS XX, 326, 
1899. 

Spiritual Development of Paul, New 
World VIII, 111-124, Mar., 1899. 
1900-01 Some Contracts of the Persian Period 
from the KH 2 Collection of the 
University of Pennsylvania, AJSL 
XVI, No. 2, 65-82, 1900. 

The Religious Use of the Bible, Report 
of the Friends' General Conference 
held at Chautauqua, 1900. 

Story of Ahikar and the Book of 
Daniel, AJSL XVI, No. 4, 242-247, 
1900. 

West Semitic Deities with Compound 
Names, JBL XX Pt. 1, 22-27, 1901. 

Sacrifices among the Wakamba in 
British East Africa, Journal of 
American Folk Lore, XII, No. 45. 
1900-01 Modern Thought in Friends' Edu- 
cational Work, Report of the Sixth 
Quinquennial Educational Con- 
ference of the Society of Friends in 
America. 

An Androgynous Babylonian Divin- 
ity, JAOS XXI Part II, 185-187, 
1900. 

The Genesis of the God Eshmun, 
JAOS XXI 188-190, 1900. 

Development of the Ministry in the 
Society of Friends, AF VII, 1046, 
Nov. 1, 1900. 

Inscription B of the Blau Monuments 
(Abstract), AJA New Series V, 2-3, 
1900. 
1901-02 On the Pantheon of Tyre, JAOS 
XXII, 115-117, 1901. 



138 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly [November 



Notes on the Blau Monuments, JAOS 
XXII, 118-125, 1901. 

Notes on the Archaic Inscription pub- 
lished by Father Scheil, JAOS 
XXII, 126-128, 1901. 

"Contracts" in "Assyrian and Baby- 
lonian Literature Selected Trans- 
lations," edited by Robert F. 
Harper, pp. XLVI-L and 256-281, 
1901. 

Notes on Peiser's Flood Map, being 
appendix I to the "Book of Genesis 
in the Light of Modern Knowledge" 
by the Rev. Elwood Worcester, 
McClure, Phillips & Co., New York, 
1901. 

A Babylonian Deed of Gift from the 
Sixth pre-Christian Millenium, AJA 
VI 35-36, 1901. 

The Haverford Library Collection of 
Babylonian Tablets (Abstract), 
AJA VI, 36, 1901, and American 
Friend. 
1902-03 The Elements of a Peace Doctrine in 
the Old Testament, a paper read at 
the Peace Conference of the Society 
of Friends in Philadelphia, Proceed- 
ings of the Friends' Peace Conference; 
Friends' Intelligencer; BW XIX, 
426-432, 1902. 

The Interpretation of an Archaic 
Tablet in the E. A. Hoffman Col- 
lection, JAOS XXIII, 21-28, 1902. 

On the Jewish-Christian Doctrine of 
the Pre-Existence of the Messiah, 
JBL XXI, 78-91, Part I, 1902. 

*Roots of Christian Teaching as 
Found in the Old Testament, xiv 
+ 271 pp., John C. Winston Co., 
Phila., 1902. 

*A Sketch of Semitic Origins, Social 
and Religious, xiii -f- 342 pp., The 
Macmillan Co., N. Y., 1902. 

Spiritual Exercise, American Friend. 
1903-04 The Jerusalem of David and Solomon, 
BW. XXII, 8-21, July, 1903. 

The Mosaic Recently Found at 'Ain 
'Arrub, JBL XXII 41-44, Part I, 
1903. 

Report of the Director of the Amer- 
ican School for Oriental Study and 
Research in Palestine, AJA supp. 
to Vol. VII, 35-44, 1903. 

Researches of the American School 
in Palestine, JBL, XXII, Part 2, 
164-186, 1903. 



"Two Hebrew Weights." — "New 
Collation of the Blau Monuments," 
JAOS XXIV, 384-387, 388-389, 
1903. 

Myth and Fiction in the Bible, BW 
XXII, 347-349, 1903. 
1904r-05 Levitical Cities of Israel in the Light 
of the Excavation at Gezer, BW 
XXIV, 167-179, 1904. 

*A Year's Wanderings in Bible Lands, 
276 pp., 147 illustrations and a map, 
Ferris and Leach, Phil., 1904. 

Eighth Psalm: An Interpretation, BW 
XXIV, 343-346, 1904. 
1905-06 Gethsemene, AF., XII, 396-397. . 

*" Haverford Library Collection of 
Cuneiform Tablets" or "Docu- 
ments from the Temple Archives of 
Telloh," Part 1, 28 pp.+ 50 pi., John 
C. Winston Co., Phil., and Headley 
Bros., London, 1905. 

Calvary, AF., XII 428-430, 1905. 
1906-07 Palestine Before the Coming of Israel, 
BW XXVIII, 360-373, 1906. 

Three objects in the Collection of Mr. 
Herbert Clark in Jerusalem, JAOS 
XXVII 400-402, 1906. 
1908-09 The Astro-Mythical School of Bib- 
lical Interpretation, BW XXXI, 
433-447, 1908. 

*A Critical and Exegetical Commen- 
tary on Ecclesiastes, a Volume of 
the International Critical Commen- 
tary, pub. Charles Scribners Sons, 
N. Y., and T. T. Clark, Edin., xiv 
+ 212 pp., 1908. 

Friends' Ministry in the Early Eigh- 
teenth Century, AF XV 520-523, 
1908. 

The Origin of Some Cuneiform Signs, 
in Old Testament and Semitic Studies 
in Memory of William Rainey 
Harper, Vol. II, 227-258, 1908. 

Recent German Theories of Foreign 
Influence in the Bible BW XXXI, 
336-347, 1908. 

The Text and Interpretation of Eccle- 
siastes 5:19, JBL, XXVII, 65-66, 
1908. 

Abstract of a Paper on the "Develop- 
ment of Babylonian Picture Writ- 
ing," AJA New Series XIII, 53, 
1908. 

The Christian Message According to 
Paul, Friends' Quarterly Examiner, 
No. 271, 309-326, 1908. 






1919] 



Professor George Barton: An Appreciation 



139 



Friends' Ministry in the Eighteenth 
Century, British Friend, New Series, 
XVIII, 23-24 and 51-52. 

The Message of Christ, Friends' 
Quarterly Examiner, No. 170, 232- 
248. 

Missionary Influence in Turkey, in 
J. L. Barton's "Daybreak in Tur- 
key," p. 118. 

On an Old Babylonian Letter ad- 
dressed "to Lushtamar," JAOS 
XXIX, 220-223, 1908. 

On the Origin of Plato's Nuptial 
Number, JAOS XXIX 210-219, 
1908. 

On the Reading of D'EPI T# II 
Samuel 12:27, JBL XXVII, Fart 
II, 147-152, 1908. 
1909-10 Parables outside the Gospels, BW 
XXXIII, 305-313, 1909. 

Penn and Religious Liberty, in " Penn 
and Religious Liberty " by Clergy- 
men of Sixteen Denominations, pp. 
35-38, 1909. 

Some Problems of Ancient Pales- 
tinian Topography, JBL XXVIII, 
Pt. 1, 26-33, 1909. 

*The Haverford Library Collection of 
Cuneiform Tablets, Part II, 36 pp. 
+ ii+ 50 pi. John C. Winston, 
1909. 

Abraham and Archaeology, JBL 
XXVIII (2) 152-168, 1909. 
' The Christian Message in the Johan- 
nine Writings, Friends' Quarterly 
-Examiner XLIII 456-470, 1909. 
1910-11 Patriarchal Names in Babylonian 
Documents, AF., XVII 132-133, 
1910. 

Historic Forms of the Christian Mes- 
sage, "The Christian Message for 
the Twentieth Century," Friends 1 
Quarterly Examiner, No. 176, 473- 
498, 1910. 

Hilprecht's New Deluge Tablet, 
Public Ledger, p. 2, Apr. 3, 1910. 
(Quoted in part in the Literary 
Digest, p. 960, 1910.) 

Another view of Hilprecht's Deluge 
Tablet, Expository Times, Edin. 
XXI 504-507, 1910. 

The Christian Message in the Eastern 
Church, Friends' Quarterly Exam- 
iner XLIV 71-88, 1910. 



The Christian Message in the Western 
Church, Friends' Quarterly Exam- 
iner XLIV 177-194, 1910. 

The Christian Message According to 
the Early Friends, Friends' Quar- 
terly Review XLIV 305-323, 1910. 

President Sharpless, A Character 
Sketch, The Haverfordian, XXXI 
. No. 1, 7-8, 1910. 

*The Heart of the Christian Message, 
viii +131 pp. West, Newman and 
Co., London, 1910. 

Hilprecht's Fragment of the Baby- 
lonian Deluge Story, JAOS XXXI 
30-48, 1910. 
1911-12 * Commentary on the Book of Job, in 
The Bible for Home and School, 
XI + 321 pp. Macmillan Co., 
N.Y., 1911. 

*The Christian Message for the 
Twentieth Century, 23 pp. W. 
Sessions, York, England, 1911. 

The Babylonian Calender of the 
Reigns of Lugalanda and Urkagina, 
JAOS XXXI, 251-271, 1911. 

The Composition of Job 24-30, JBL 
XXX, 66-77, 1911. 

A Babylonian Ledger Account of 
Reeds and Wood, AJSL XXVII 
322-327, 1911. 

The Twelfth Line of Hilprecht's 
Deluge Tablet, Expository Times, 
XXII 2, 89-90, 1910. 

Another Word about Hilprecht's 
Deluge Tablet, Ibid XXII 6, 278- 
279, 1911. 

Rahab, Ibid XXII, 7, 331-332, 1911. 

The Influence of the Babylonian 
Exile on the Religion of Israel, BW 
XXXVII, 369-378, 1911. 
1911-12 Light on the Bible from Ancient 
Samaria, Sunday School World, LI, 
86-87. 

On the Etymology of Ishtar JAOS 
XXXI 355-358, 1911. 

The Expression SA-Df/G in Early 
Sumerian Texts, AJSL XXVIII 
63-65, 1911. 
1912-13 Another Babylonian Ledger Account 
of Reeds and Wood, AJSL XXVin 
207-210, 1912. 

One of the Oldest Babylonian Tablets 
in the World, University of Penn- 
sylvania Museum Journal III 4-6, 
1912. 



140 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly [November 



Moses and the Covenant with Yah- 
weh, BW XXXIX 17-26, 1912. 

The Pre-prophetic Period in Canaan, 
BW XXXIX 88-89, 1912. 

The Prophets of the Eighth Century, 
BW XXXIX 157-166, 1912. 

Deuteronomy and Jeremiah, BW 
XXXIX 268-275, 1912. 

From Ezekiel to Nehemiah, BW 
XXXIX 307-314, 1912. 

From Nehemiah to Christ, BW 
XXXIX 396-402, 1912. 

The Original Home of the Story of 
Job, JBL XXXI pt. 2, 63-68, 1912. 

* "The Origin and Development of 
Babylonian Writing," Part I, "A 
Genealogical Sign List with In- 
dices. " xxiv pp. +296 autographed 
plates, large 8 vo., Leipsic, J. C. 
Hinrichs'sche Buchlandung, The 
Johns Hopkins Press, Baltimore, 
1912. 

"Yahweh Before Moses" in "Studies 
in the History of Religions," pre- 
sented to C. H. Toy by Pupils, 
Colleagues and Friends, pp. 187- 
204, The Macmillan Co., 1912. 

The Origin of the Names of Angels 
and Demons in the Extra-Canon- 
ical Apocalyptic Literature to 100 
A.D., JBL XXXI Pt. 4, 156-167, 
1912. 

The Evolution of the Religion of 
Israel, a series of articles BW Vol. 
XXXIX passim, 1912. 
1913-14 Still another Babylonian Ledger of 
Reeds and Wood, AJSL XXIX 
138-142, 1913. 

Babylonian Tablets in the Collection 
of George Vaux, Jr., AJSL XXIX 
126-137, 1913. 

The Hittites, Sunday School World 
LIII 55-56, reprinted in the Aus- 
tralian Sunday School Teacher 
XXIV 4, 137-138, Melbourne, 19 13. 

A Text of the Oldest Period of Baby- 
lonian Writing, Orientalische Liter- 
aturzeitung XVI Cols. 6-11, 1913. 

Joseph Smith as a Translator, Desert 
Evening News, Salt Lake City, part 
of a Symposium of Oriental Scholars 
arranged by Bishop Spaulding of 
Utah, Part 5, Mar. 7, 1913. 

Some Reflections of Christian Wor- 
ship, Friends' Fellowship Papers, 



VII, 47-54, Birmingham, Eng., 
Mar. 1913, reprinted in the AF., 
New Series, 1 194-295, 1913. 

Note on the Inscription of Enkhegal, 
AJA, XVII 84-85, 1913.. 

Recent Excavations in Palestine, 
Journal of the Numismatic and Anti- 
quarian Society of Phil., XXVI 
205-216, 1913. 

Recent Researches in the Sumerian 
Calender, JAOS XXXIII, 1-9,1913. 

The Historical Value of the Patri- 
archal Narratives, Proceedings of 
the American Philosophical Society , 
LII 184-200; reprinted in abstract 
in Science, XXXVII, 721-723, 
1913; in N. Y. Outlook, June 6, 
1913; in Rural Manhood, Sept., 
1913; and the Sunday School World, 
Oct., 1913. 

The Tablet of Enkhegal, University of 
Pennsylvania Museum Journal IV, 
50-54, 1913. 

Hebrew and Babylonian Ideas of 
God, AJT XVII, 417-419, 1913. 

•*The Origin and Development of 
Babylonian Writing, Part II, "A 
Classified List of Simple Ideographs 
with Analysis and Discussion" vi 
+ 295 pp. + 2 pi., 8 vo., Leipsic, 
1913. 

The Names of Two Kings of Adab, 
JAOS XXXIII 295-296, 800, 1913. 

Kugler's Criterion for Determining 
the Order of the Month in the 
Earliest Babylonian Calender, 
JAOS XXXIII, 297-305, 1913. 

"Higher" Archaeology and the Ver- 
dict of Criticism, JBL XXXII 
244-260, 1913. 
1914-15 *The Haverford Library Collection 
of Cuneiform Tablets, Part III, 
62 p. + 54 pi., John C. Winston, 
1914. 

The Hermeneutic Canon "Interpret 
Historically" in the Light of 
Modern Research, JBL XXXIII 
56-77 Pt. I, 1914. 

The Exegesis of kviavrovs in Galatians 
4:10 and its Bearing on the Date 
of the Epistle, JBL XXXIII Pt. 2, 
118-126, 1914. 

An Attempt at a Scientific Classifi- 
cation of Biblical Literature, BW 
XLIII 251-257, 1914. 



1919] 



Professor George Barton: An Appreciation 



141 



The Burning Bush: An Epitome of a 
Great Religious Experience. Pres- 
ent Day Papers, I, 103-106, Haver- 
ford, Pa., 1914. 

The excavations at Jericho and 
Samaria, Sunday School World, 
LIV 52-54, 1914. 

Recent Excavations at Beth-Shemesh 
and Jerusalem, Sunday School 
World, LIV, 147-149, 1914. 

A New Account of the Creation, 
Sunday School World, LIV, 485, 
Phil., 1914. 

Deciphering the Hittite Inscriptions, 
Sunday School World, LIV, 485, 
1914. 

The Life of Christ in Recent Research, 
Friends' Quarterly Examiner, 477- 
496, 1914. 

Religious Conceptions Underlying 
Sumerian Proper Names, JA5S 
XXXIV 315-320, 1914. 

Albert J. Edmunds and the Buddhist 

and Christian Gospels, JBL 

XXXIII 244, 1914. 

1915-16 Kings Before the Flood, U. of P. 

Museum Journal, VI 55-58, 1915. 

*Sumerian Business and Adminis- 
trative Documents from the Earliest 
Times to the Dynasty of Agade, pp. 
36 + lxiv autographed plates, 1915. 

New Light on the Flood and the Ante- 
diluvian Patriarchs, Sunday School 
World, LV 200-202, 1915. 

A New Apocalypse, Present Day 
Papers, II 175-178, 1915. 

Spiritual Life and Expanding Knowl- 
edge, Ibid. 275-278, 191, reprinted 
in The Friend, LV 729-730, 1915. 
1916-17 *Archaeology and the Bible, American 
Sunday School Union pub. XIII + 
461pp., 114 pi., 8 vo., 1916. 
A Sumerian Source of the Fourth 
and Fifth Chapters of Genesis, 
JBL XXXIV 1-9, 1916. 
1917-18 *The Religions of the World, xii + 
349 pp., University of Chicago 
Press, 1917. 

Ancient Babylonian Expressions of 
the Religious Spirit, Presidential 
Address delivered April 10, 1917, 
Boston, JAOS XXXVII 23-42, 
1917. 



A New Babylonian Account of the 
Creation of Man, Proceedings of the 
American Philosophical Society , LVI 
275-280, 1917. 

A Word with Reference to "Emperor 
Worship" in Babylonia, JAOS 
XXXVII 162-163, 1917. 
1917-18 Takku, JAOS XXXVII 163-64, 1917. 

*Archaeology and the Bible, 2d Ed., 
revised and enlarged xvi -f- 469 -f- 
114 pi. The Union Press, Phil., 
1917. 

Suggestions for Class Room Treat- 
ment in War Time of the Teachings 
of the Bible Concerning War, — 
Report of 1917 Conference of the 
Association of Biblical Instructors 
in American Colleges and Secon- 
dary Schools. c 12-14, 1917. 

New Babylonian Material Concern- 
ing Creation and Paradise, AJT 
XXI, 571-597, 1917. 
1918-19 The Confessions of a Quaker, Outlook, 
CXVIII 218-219, 1918. 

*Haverford Library Collection of 
Cuneiform Tablets, 3 Vols, re- 
issued, Vol. I, 27 pp. -f- 50 auto- 
graphed plates; Vol. II, 36 pp. + 
50 autographed plates; Vol. Ill, 
62 pp. -f- 54 autographed Plates. 
Yale University Press, 1918. 

Investigations near the Damascus 
Gate, Jerusalem, Art and Archae- 
ology, VII, 212-214, 1918. 

*Miscellaneous Babylonian Inscrip- 
tions, Part I, Sumerian Religious 
Texts, 67 pp. + 41 pi., Yale Uni- 
versity Press, 1918. 

The Official Quaker Testimony against 
War Re-examined, Friends' Quar- 
terly Examiner, No. 205, 13-32, 
1918. 

On the Identification of a Portrait 
Statue of a Semitic Babylonian 
King, AJSL 34, pp. 204-206, 1918. 

*The Religion of Israel, xvi -f- 289 pp. 
The Macmillan Co., N. Y., 1918. 

The Mohammedan and Christian Con- 
ceptions of God, chap. IX in The 
Christian Approach to Islam, by 
James L. Barton, The Pilgrim 
Press, 1918. 

Beatrice Allard. 



142 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly [November 



IN MEMORIAM 

KARL DETLEY JESSEN 



Karl Detley Jessen, Ph.D., Professor of Ger- 
man at Bryn Mawr since 1904, died on Septem- 
ber 25 in the Bryn Mawr Hospital after an 
operation for appendicitis. He is survived by 
his widow, who was Myra Stephanie Richards, 
'15, and by a daughter. 

Dr. Jessen, who was a widely known German 
scholar, was born in Winnemark, Schleswig- 
Holstein, Germany, in 1872. After studying in 
the universities of Kiel and Berlin, he came 
to the United States in 1892, and received the 
degree of bachelor of arts from the University 
of Chicago in 1896. He enlisted as a volunteer 
soldier in the Spanish-American War, but his 



health gave out and he returned to Germany 
for a time. The University of Berlin conferred 
upon him the degree of doctor of philosophy 
in 1901. 

From 1901, until he came to Bryn Mawr in 
1904, Dr. Jessen was instructor and lecturer 
on German literature and aesthetics in Harvard 
University. He was the author of numerous 
essays, literary, social, and political, for ency- 
clopedias, magazines, and newspapers. 

President Taft, Dr. Rufus Jones and many 
members of the faculty attended the funeral,, 
which took place on September 27. 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE ENTER POLITICS 



The corner saloon is the political head- 
quarters of Bertha Rembaugh '97, Republican 
candidate for municipal court justice in the first 
district of New York City. She opened her 
vigorous campaign for office on October 22 with 
a "tea fight" over a bar on Old Hudson Street. 

The New York Tribune reporter who was 
present gives the following vivid account of the 
invasion of Tammany's stronghold. 

The "tea fight" made its entrance into New 
York political life yesterday when hundreds of 
voting mothers of the Lower West Side swarmed 
into a former saloon at 551 Hudson Street and, 
with their feet on the brass rail, where their 
husbands before them had discussed politics in 
days gone by, planned for the election of Miss 
Bertha Rembaugh as justice of the Municipal 
Court. 

A brass samovar graced the bar, while ar- 
ranged neatly on the Hallowe'en crepe paper 
covers were piles of ginger snaps, pitchers of 
cream and saucers of lemon, candies and a few 
precious plates of homemade cake given by 
women workers for Miss Rembaugh, whose 
loyalty guarantees not only house-to-house can- 
vassing, but the baking of cake for the candi- 
date's glory. 

The swarms of enthusiastic voters fell upon 
the erstwhile bar and its unaccustomed burden 
with an appetite which swept it bare more than 
once before nightfall, and compelled Mary 
Bookstaver Knoblauch, '97, hostess for the 



afternoon, to send out hurry calls for boxed 
crackers and ginger snaps from the nearest 
grocery store. 

On Outside Looking In 

Outside the children belonging to the voters 
within, augmented by their friends and acquain- 
tances from all parts within walking distance, 
pushed against the swinging doors with a free- 
dom they never knew in the old days, and 
through the crack sent up their vociferous de- 
mand for ginger snaps and Miss Rembaugh. 

The tender heart of young Mrs. Fiorella H. 
La Guardia was touched by the insistent plea, 
and while the campaigners were busy with the 
mothers, she took occasion to throw out into the 
joyous mob the contents of several boxes of 
ginger snaps and candy. It was the first fling 
in "real politics" that the bride of the Repub- 
lican candidate for President of the Board of 
Aldermen has permitted herself, and she found 
it to her liking. 

"I shall take part in the street meeting for 
Miss Rembaugh hereafter," she said. "I can 
speak Italian, and I shall go with her on the 
automobile truck and speak to the women as 
they go to their evening marketing or to the 
motion picture houses. 

"I believe all women ought to work for Miss 
Rembaugh, as it is only fair to have one woman 
judge in cases where women's affairs are con- 



1919] 



Alumnae Enter Politics 



143 



stantly being considered, and she is a splendidly 
capable person for the office." 

Miss Rembaugh made a speech to the tea 
drinkers, telling them she was sure they were 
all going to vote for her, but that they must 
also urge their friends to vote for her. 

"We invited you to come here today," she 
said, " to get you into the habit of coming here 
to talk politics, and, now you have found the 
way, we hope you will come often and help in 
the campaign." 

A large, smiling woman in the front row, who 
had been there since 2 o'clock, clapped her hands. 

"Sure, we'll work for ye, darlin'!" she cried. 

The women appeared to take delight in resting 
their feet on the brass rail and contemplating 
the former saloon in the hour of its fall. 

Called Happy Omen 

"It's a happy omen when a woman goes into 
politics from what used to be a saloon," declared 
Mrs. John O'Dowd. "The saloon has broken 
up enough women's homes, so it is time we 
women broke it up." 

Miss Rembaugh is the nominee of the Re- 
publican party, but her committee is non- 
partisan. 

The brass samovar and the best china cups 
used for the tea came from Greenwich House, 
whose head worker, Mrs. Vladimir Simkovitch, 
is a member of Miss Rembaugh's committee, 
although she is herself a Democrat. The chair- 
man of Miss Rembaugh's committee is Mrs. 
Leslie J. Tomkins, also a Democrat, and among 
its members are Mrs. Alice Duer Miller and Mrs. 
Charles L. Tiffany, both Democrats. Other 
prominent members are Miss Mary Garrett 
Hay, Dr. Josephine Baker, Mrs. Jacob Riis, 
Mrs. Raymond Brown, Mrs. Rosalie Lowe 
Whitney and Mrs. La Guardia. Only women 
of the 1st Judicial District may vote for Miss 
Rembaugh, but her campaign has attracted the 
interest of women all over the city, not only 
because she is a pioneer in a new field, but 
because justices of the Municipal Court sit in 
courts in all parts of the city. 

The New York Evening Sun paints this taking 
picture of Miss Rembaugh. 

Persons who beheld this formerly somewhat 
austere and reserved woman lawyer standing 
jauntily with one foot on the brass rail, leaning 
easily against the flag draped bar and talking 
with a pleased smile to the rows of Irish and 
Italian mothers and babies before her about 



how they ought to vote for her and get their 
husbands to do so reflected that politics cer- 
tainly does educate women. Campaign Mana- 
ger Miss Flannagan admitted that when the 
matinee ended the star requested to be led to 
a nice quiet grave, but she held out blithely 
till the last curtain. 

PLEA FOR PARTISAN WOMEN 

Anna B. Lawther, '97 president of the Iowa 
Suffrage Association, has been appointed Asso- 
ciate Democratic National Committee Member 
for Iowa. In the following article, especially 
written for The Quarterly, Miss Lawther 
explains why she considers women voters can 
do most good by aligning themselves with the 
great political parties. She writes: 

Women in the TJnited States will be a large 
factor in the next presidential election, for 
15,500,000 women have the right to vote for 
president, and of this number about 8,000,000 
are voting for president of the United States for 
the first time. 

This enormous body of new voters will be 
more effective, the better they are organized in 
some way to inspire women with the desire to 
have the best possible government for their 
country, and inform them that each individual 
has a small amount of power in determining the 
kind of government the country shall have. 

While voting for a president once in four 
years does not affect directly local and state 
politics, the fact that women are doubtless soon 
to have full suffrage, has made all political 
parties eager to have in their ranks the women 
voters. Women for the first time in the politi- 
cal history of the country made a definite im- 
pression on national politics in 1916; but this 
impression could not have been made, had not 
the progressive platform of 1912, not only 
endorsed woman suffrage, but that party took 
into its organization prominent women voters 
who learned much of party machinery. And 
"machine" is only another term for organization. 

The Socialist party and the Prohibition party 
have always given equal privileges to the men 
and women; but the two great parties, the 
Republican party and the Democratic party 
have come very slowly to recognize the women 
voters as an asset to their organizations. How- 
ever, both parties now realize that they must 
secure the women's vote in order to secure 
political power. 



144 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly [November 



Because I am a Democrat, and because it 
has been my privilege to be appointed the Asso- 
ciate Member for Iowa for the Democratic 
National Committee, I can speak for the Demo- 
cratic party's attitude toward the women voters, 
and I would not have accepted this position, 
had I not believed that women could accom- 
plish more in the way of good government by 
enjoying all the privileges and accepting all the 
responsibilities as citizens. 

The Democratic party has on its National 
Executive committee to represent the women 
voters Mrs. George Bass, of Chicago. She was 
on the committee in 1916, and to her is attrib- 
uted much of the success for securing for Presi- 
dent Wilson the vote of the western women. 

The Democratic National committee, on the 
advice of Mrs. Bass, appointed a woman from 
each state to represent the Democratic women 
of each state, and this woman is called the 
Associate National committee member. 

A meeting of men and women, one or two 
men from every state, and at least one woman 
from every state, met in Chicago on May 28 
and 29, to outline a policy for the future of the 
Democratic party. This was one of the most 
enthusiastic meetings I have ever attended, and 
the first one in which I truly felt that the women 
were welcome on an equal footing with the men. 
The women who spoke at this conference were 
convinced that more can be accomplished in 
the way of good government by partisan women 
than by women who are non-partisan, because 
they knew that policies and plans of a party 
are made in the smaller meetings, and are 
adopted by those who have less time to devote 
to political questions. 

Women who have been eager to be made 
voting citizens should avail themselves of the 
advantages of working with the smaller groups 
of statesmen or politicians who are outlining 
the policies of government, for in these groups 
their influence will be of greater value. Through- 
out the states and counties and municipalities, 
it is the partisan woman who sits in committee 
meetings who can impress the men and women 
of that community more effectively than if she 
waits to either accept or reject a policy offered 
to her at an election. 



The Democratic party throughout the nation 
is adding on an equal footing women voters, 
and in each state there is an Associate member 
for the National committee, and in each Con- 
gressional District a leader of the women who 
will be a member of the State Democratic Com- 
mittee, and take part in the councils of the 
party. In each county there is to be a county 
chairman appointed for the women, and she 
will be a member of the county committee, and 
will appoint precinct women who will also attend 
not only the precinct meetings, but meetings of 
the county. This arrangement is but tempo- 
rary, or until after another Democratic conven- 
tion shall make a definite basis for securing these 
women leaders. 

The Democratic women of Iowa are to be 
invited to the state Democratic convention, are 
to sit as delegates, and it is hoped that as many 
women as men will attend the next convention. 

A conference of the Democratic men and 
women, with Chairman Homer S. Cummings 
of the Democratic National Committee, and 
Mrs. George Bass, and Mrs. Antoinette Funk, as 
principal speakers, was held in Des Moines on 
July 25,. and at this meeting, the first meeting 
of its kind, 200 women and 300 men were in 
attendance, although the thermometer regis- 
tered 93 in the shade. 

I feel confident that the women will become 
partisans, although at present they are not 
nearly so partisan as the men who have been 
voting for many years. I still think there is 
room for the League of Women Voters which 
proposes to secure for the women and children 
of the Nation better laws and higher ideals of 
government. The League of Women Voters 
will be a great assistance to the partisan women 
in outlining these plans, and the partisan women, 
if they are in close touch with the party organi- 
zation, and the League of Women Voters, can 
put some of these reforms into the party plat- 
form in the hope of their being carried out by 
the administration. 

Anna B. Lawther, 
Democratic Associate 
National Committee 
Member for Iowa. 



1919] 



Campus Notes 

CAMPUS NOTES 



145 



President Taft arrived in Canada on Sep- 
tember 7th after a two months' trip with 
President Thomas in England, France, and Italy, 
made for the purpose of arranging for scholar- 
ships and exchange professors. 

The French, and particularly the English, 
gave them a warm reception, but the Italians 
of the intellectual classes were anti-American 
and received them coldly, in one case giving 
them a decided rebuff. 

Dean Gildersleeve, acting as a special delegate 
of the Foreign Relations Committee of the A. 
C. A., and Miss Choate, treasurer of the Rose 
Sidgwick Memorial Scholarship Fund, sailed 
with Miss Thomas and President Taft. At a 
reception given at Bedford College by the British 
University women, Dean Gildersleeve spoke on 
the part college women can play in creating 
a better understanding between England and 
America. A joint committee of the A. C. A. 
and the British University Women met to ar- 
range for scholarships and exchange professors. 

During the ten days spent in Paris, Miss 
Thomas and President Taft discussed with the 
officers of the American University Union, 
formed for the American soldiers in France, 
plans for continuing the Union after the War 
and admitting women. Recently an invitation 
has been extended to the American College 
Women in Paris to join the Union, and it is 
hoped that the house formerly used by Mrs. 
Whitelaw Reid as a hostel for American artists 
in Paris, may be used for the American students 
of the Sorbonne this winter. 

August was spent in travelling in Northern 
Italy. The food was poor and prices high, 
according to President Taft, while the anti- 
American feeling prevented any marked success 
in arranging for exchange professors or scholars. 

Educational Conditions in Europe 

Referring to her trip with President Thomas 
in England, Miss Taft said: "In England, 
where the enthusiasm of women for education 
is far greater than it has ever been, the accom- 
modations are entirely inadequate and all the 
women we met were in despair over the lack of 
funds, the lack of buildings, and the lack of 
accommodations generally for girls who wish 
a college education. It seems a real tragedy 
that in England girls should be deprived of it 
who see in it their best hope of a useful and 



happy life. In France, where the work of the 
women in the war has been fully recognized, 
there has been, I am sorry to say, a certain 
reaction on the part of educational authorities 
against women due to the fact that they are 
afraid they will wish to take the place of men 
in some of the teaching positions. The women 
are no longer allowed to compete with men in 
some of the examinations. I don't think that 
this will really affect the question of the possi- 
bility of French women getting as good an 
education as they have in the past, except that 
it seems unfortunate that at this time France 
should return to a double standard in the matter 
of education because these examinations are a 
most important factor of the French educational 
system. 

"Here in America we have a great deal still 
to do for women's education. We still need 
money, and it is harder to get money for women's 
education than for men's. The great numbers 
of wealthy alumni of men's colleges will always 
give money. The graduates of women's colleges 
have very little money, and it is necessary for 
them to depend upon the friends of women's 
education all over the country for their endow- 
ment. But you who are assembled here this 
morning have the best opportunity of getting 
the best education you can, and I want to tell 
you that I think you are all very fortunate 
young women." — The College News. 

HONORING DR. SHAW 

Alumnae and Undergraduates of Bryn Mawr 
joined in honoring the memory of Dr. Anna 
Howard Shaw at a service held in the chapel on 
October 2. Acting President Taft presided, and 
the speakers were Mrs. John Miller, President 
of the Pennsylvania Woman's Suffrage League, 
and Mrs. George Gellhorn, President of the 
Missouri League of Woman Voters. Mrs. Gell- 
horn was Edna Fischel, '00. 

"No class of people were fonder of Dr. Shaw 
than the undergraduates of Bryn Mawr," 
declared Miss Taft. "Dr. Shaw had the en- 
thusiasm, the spontaneity and even the humor 
of youth. She really loved Bryn Mawr, and I 
think she felt closer to it than to any other 
woman's college. So it is particularly appro- 
priate that we should have some memorial to 
her." 



146 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly [November 



Mrs. Miller told of her experiences in working 
side by side with the great suffrage leader. ' ' Dr. 
Shaw was a pioneer," she said, "in that she went 
to college, was a doctor, a minister and one of 
the greatest propagandists and orators we have 
had in this country." Describing her experi- 
ences while traveling with Dr. Shaw on a 
speaking tour in Northern Pennsylvania, suffer- 
ing from jerkwater trains and one-night stands, 
Mrs. Miller declared that from Dr. Shaw she 
learned what it was to be a "good salt" under 
trying circumstances. She was present in 
Washington when the Secretary of War con- 
ferred the Distinguished Service Cross upon Dr. 
Shaw, who at that time was debating whether 
to go abroad with President Thomas or tour 
twenty-five states for the League to Enforce 
Peace. She chose the latter course because she 
felt it her duty, and it was on this trip that she 
was seized with her last illness. "Dr. Shaw's 
work was finished," concluded Mrs. Miller, 
"and she died at the zenith of her powers, 
knowing that the women of the world were 
going to have the fullest opportunity to show 
their capabilities." 

Mrs. Gellhorn who is the chairman of the 
Committee for the Anna Howard Shaw 
Memorial Fund, spoke of the particular appro- 
priateness of honoring Dr. Shaw's memory by 
the endowment of a chair of politics. "Dr. 
Shaw," she said, "has given us opportunity, 
and it is our responsibility now to see that we 
push open all the doors which she has opened 
just a crack. She has friends and admirers all 
over the world who will be only too glad to 
contribute to such a chair. It is our golden 
opportunity to pay back in some tiny measure 
what she has done for us." — The College News. 

COURSES IN SOCIAL RESEARCH 

Dr. Susan M. Kingsbury, Carola Woerishoffer 
professor of social economy at Bryn Mawr 
published the following letter in The New Re- 
public, September 10 on the Bryn Mawr courses 
in industrial supervision and employment 
management. 

Sir: In June of 1918, a letter published in your 
columns told of the war emergency graduate 
courses in Industrial Supervision and Employ- 
ment Management to be offered at Bryn Mawr 
College. In response, hundreds of your readers 
made inquiries and a number of them are among 
the thirty young women who after eight months 
of rigorous training in theory, technique, and 



practice, are now aiding in industrial readjust- 
ment and reconstruction, or are just entering 
industry as employment managers, research 
students of labor conditions, supervisors of 
industrial clubs, etc. 

So successful have these courses proved that 
the National War Council of the Young Women's 
Christian Association has renewed its contribu- 
tion to Bryn Mawr College so that the Carola 
Woerishoffer Graduate Department of Social 
Economy and Social Research might continue 
these graduate courses for the year 1919-1920. 
The work will be of the same order, and the 
courses in labor and industrial organization, in 
theory and technique, and in field practice will 
again be given by Miss Anna Bezanson. Other 
regular seminaries of the college in Industrial 
Research and Surveys, in vocational Psychology 
in social Psychology and Philosophy and in 
Politics will be available for election. 

The great problems of the people are to be 
solved not only by attaining adequate industrial 
understanding and unity, but by securing wise 
community organization and solidarity. The 
Carola Woerishoffer Graduate Department is, 
therefore, offering new and evolved graduate 
courses in those subjects which will fit women 
as community secretaries and organizers. 
Courses in theory and technique of Community 
and Block Organization and in the principles 
and methods of stimulating, developing and 
utilizing the artistic and dramatic impulses and 
resources of the community will be offered. 
Unusual and unique opportunity for training in 
the application of theory is secured through prac- 
tice in the well organized Bryn Mawr Community 
Center, in the Block Organizations and Com- 
munity Service Associations which have recently 
been developed under Community Service Incor- 
porated of Philadelphia, and in the old and well 
established settlements of Philadelphia. The 
foundations of Community work rest on the 
principles of education, as applied to the indi- 
vidual on the one hand, and as applied to social 
groups on the other, and so Professor Castro will 
give a seminary in the principles of education 
as applied to community work, and Professor 
Leuba, a seminary in the principles of Psychology 
as applied to social groups. Two other im- 
portant seminaries are available for second year 
students — one in Community Surveys and one 
in Municipal and Local Government. 

Several scholarships of the value of $300 are 
now available in both of these subjects — in 
Industrial Supervision and Employment Man- 



1919] 



Campus Notes 



147 



agement and in Community Organization and 
full information with regard to requirements 
and opportunities may be secured from the 
Secretary, Bryn Mawr College, Pennsylvania. 
Susan M. Kingsbury. 

Eleanor Dulles, '17, who gave up a Carola 
Woerishoffer Scholarship two years ago to go to 
France, has been awarded the Bryn Mawr I. C. 
S. A. Scholarship and has come back to take the 
course in Industrial Supervision and Employ- 
ment Management with special application to 
Psychology. This is the first time that a 
fellow has been allowed by the I. C. S. A. 
to take up other work than Community Organ- 
ization. 

Nine colleges, Radcliffe, California, Missouri, 
British Columbia, Stanford, Columbia, Mt. 
Holyoke, Dickinson and Barnard, are repre- 
sented by students who hold Y. W. C. A. 
scholarships. 

Two scholarships have been awarded by the 
Bryn Mawr Community Center to students 
taking the Community Organization course, 
with the provision that they do practice work at 
the Center. Barbara Johnson, the Smith Col- 
lege I. C. S. A. fellow, is among the students 
of the department. 

H. Spalding, '19, is studying Parole and 
Probation work, as the result of a special agree- 
ment made with the Municipal Court of 
Philadelphia. 

Mrs. Zrust, a graduate of the University of 
Nebraska, a Czeck, is studying Social Economy 
and expects to do Social Service in Russia. 

ALUMNAE AT COMMUNITY CENTER 

The Bryn Mawr Community Center opens its 
fourth year with Helen Barrett, '13, in charge. 
Hilda Smith, who has been director for the last 
three years is now dean of the college. Isabel 
Bering, '14, and Helen Robertson, '16, are 
assistants. 

THIS YEAR AT BATES HOUSE 

Since only 20 Bryn Mawr workers went to 
Bates House at Long Branch this summer, 
more outsiders were called in for assistance 
than ever in the past. 

Miss Dora Gray of Agnes Smith College was 
director. She was assisted by Grace Dedman, 
British graduate scholar at Bryn Mawr. Vir- 



ginia Deems for three years director of the house 
was present for the Business Girls' Week. 

SOPHOMORE RULES GO 

College Courtesy Rules were read to the 
Freshmen in hall meetings which according to 
The College News were conducted in a quiet and 
dignified manner. The Freshmen will enforce 
these rules themselves and any criticism of their 
behavior is to come from the Junior president 
and not from the Sophomores. This class on 
the other hand is reported to have shown much 
humility in emphasizing to the Freshmen that 
both the two lower classes are bound by the 
same rules of courtesy to upper classmen. 

PUBLISH BOOKLET OF VERSE 

The Reeling and Writhing Club has published 
a small book of verse entitled "Humble Voy- 
agers." The aim of this organization is "to 
put writing, or the attempt to write, on the same 
basis of respectability with basketball and other 
recognized recreations." 

FRESHMAN EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

The committee who will manage the Fresh- 
man class for the first five weeks of college is 
Frances Knox, Frances Matteson, Betty Gray 
and Sarah Thomas. 

CLUB EXECUTIVES FOR 1919-1920 

English Club: President, Alice Harrison, '20. 
Other officers to be elected in the fall. 

French: President, Margaret Dent, '20; Vice- 
president, Eleanor Harris, '21; Secretary, Fran- 
ces Robbins, '22. 

History: President, Dorothy Smith, '20; Vice- 
president, Zella Boynton, '20; Secretary, Louise 
Cadot, '21. 

Glee: President, Emily Kimbrough, '21; 
Business Manager, Eleanore Boswell, '21; Stage 
Manager, Elizabeth Cecil, '21. 

Discussion: President, Margaret Littell, '20; 
Vice-president, Helen Hill, '21; Secretary, Helen 
Rubel, '21; Executive Board, Dr. Leuba and 
Alice Harrison, '20. 

Suffrage: President, Zella Boynton, '20; Vice- 
president, Ellen Jay, '21; Secretary, Eleanor 
Newell, '21. 



148 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly [November 



NEWS FROM THE CLASSES 



1889 

Class editor, Mrs. Frank H. Simpson, Over- 
look, College Hill, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Emily James Smith (Mrs. George Haven 
Putnam) is a member of the staff of instructors 
of the New School for Social Research which 
opened last month in New York City. Mrs. 
Putnam is giving a course on habit and history. 

1891 

Class editor, Miss Maria Voorhees Bedinger, 
Anchorage, Ky. 

1892 

Class editor, Mrs. Frederick M. Ives, 318 West 
75th Street, New York City. 

Edith Wetherill Ives (Mrs. Frederick M. 
Ives) expects to spend the winter away from 
New York because her daughter, Elizabeth and 
her three sons will be at boarding school. 

Mary Taylor Mason spent the summer in 
Maine but returned to German town, Phila- 
delphia on October 2. 

1893 

Classs editor, Mrs. J. Esrey Johnson, Jr., 8 
Oak Way, Hartsdale, N. Y. 

Susan Walker FitzGerald (Mrs. Richard Y. 
Fitz Gerald) spoke in memory of Dr. Anna 
Howard Shaw at the August meeting of the 
Massachusetts Woman Suffrage Association. 
The farm at Bolton, Mass., occupies most of 
Mrs. FitzGerald's time. In January she began 
supplying two hospitals and a few private cus- 
tomers with eggs. She went to the farm to live 
in March and now, with her daughter Anne, 
makes two trips a week to Jamaica Plain in a 
small covered truck, selling her own fruits and 
vegetables from house to house. Anne Fitz- 
Gerald enters Bryn Mawr in October and will 
occupy a room in Merion Hall, her mother's old 
home. 

Evangeline Walker Andrews, with Mr. An- 
drews and their daughter Ethel, spent part 
of the summer camping "in a wilderness'' near 
Lake Edward, Canada. John Andrews, who 
will be graduated from Yale in 1920 and who, 
by the way, got a second lieutenantship in the 
Aviation Service, is one of about twenty college 
boys, chosen from different colleges, who were 



given an opportunity to take a two months'" 
Intensive training in various New York banks. 
In this way bankers hope to bring college men 
into the business as soon as the college course is 
finished. Mr. Andrews has just published two 
books in "The Chronicles of America" series, 
Colonial Folkways and The Fathers of New 
England. 

Louise Fulton Gucker (Mrs. Frank T. Gucker) 
and her family spent the summer near Melvin 
Village, New Hampshire. Frank Gucker enters 
the senior class of Haverford College this year. 
He holds one of the Corporation Scholarships, 
awarded to the four members of each class who 
make the highest average for the year. Caroline 
and Louise are pupils in the Phoebe Anne 
Thorne Model School. 

Grace Elder Saunders (Mrs. Frederic A. 
Saunders) will live in Cambridge this year. 
Mr. Saunders has accepted a professorship in 
Harvard University. 

Margaret Hilles Johnson (Mrs. Joseph Esrey 
Johnson, Jr.) is chairman of the New York 
College Settlement Committee, the original 
settlement of which Dr. Robbins was the first 
or second head worker. Since the old house on 
Rivington Street, the home and center of inspi- 
ration for many social workers, has been sold, 
No. 84 First Street is being occupied temporarily 
until money can be raised for a new building. 

Henrietta R. Palmer has been busy on her 
farm at Chepachet, R. I. This season she has 
devoted about a quarter of an acre to flowers,, 
with a view to raising them for market. 

S. Frances Van Kirk is continuing her work 
as a member of the French War Relief Com- 
mittee of the Emergency Aid of Pennsylvania. 

Of the $1200 pledged for the Victory Chair of 
French by the class at their reunion dinner in 
June, as their gift for 1919, $1182 has been re- 
ceived in bonds, money and promises. It is 
hoped that with the aid of the circular letters 
sent out in September several hundred dollars 
more may soon be obtained. 

By good luck for '93 Grace Elder Saunders 
spent last winter in Philadelphia and so was able 
to come to the class reunion in June. Her 
name was given in the manuscript report of the 
celebration, but by some mistake was omitted 
from the typed copy, possibly because there are 
two Saunders. The omission does not matter 
for those who were there; to the absent it takes 



1919] 



News from the Classes 



149 



something from the pleasant impression. 
Grace was one of the fifteen, the fourteen are 
glad to say. 

1894 

Class editor, Mrs. R. N. Durfee, 19 Highland 
Avenue, Fall River, Mass. 

1895 

Class editor, Miss Mary F. Ellis, 2505 South 
Lambert Street, Philadelphia, Penna. 

1896 

Class editor, Miss Mary W. Jewett, Moravia, 
N.Y. 

Elsa Bowman sailed on July 3 on La Lorraine 
to serve for six months in France as chauffeur 
for the Committee for Reconstruction of Devas- 
tated France. 

1897 

Class editor, Miss Mary M. Campbell, Walker 
Road, West Orange, N. J. 

Frances Arnold, ex-'97, who had leave of 
absence last winter from the Brearley School, 
New York, to do war work is resuming her schoo 1 
work this fall. 

Mary Campbell will go to Oregon this autumn 
to visit her sister, Grace Campbell Babson, '00 
(Mrs. Sydney Babson), at her apple ranch in 
the Hood River Valley. She will sail the end 
of December for France to join Elsa Bowman, 
'96, on a tour of the world. 

1898 

Class editor, Mrs. Wildred Bancroft, Slaters- 
ville, R. I. 

1899 

Class editor, Mrs. Edward H. Waring, 325 
Washington Street, Glen Ridge, N. J. 

Gertrude S. Ely, the first American to cross 
the Rhine at Coblenz, has returned to this 
country with the Croix de Guerre. The first 
honor was bestowed upon her in recognition of 
her constant service with the first division in the 
field; the second for her work in the "Y" hut 
just behind the lines at Soissons. 

1900 

Class editor, Miss Mary Helen MacCoy, Social 
Service, Base Hospital, Camp Devens, Mass. 

Sarah Emery Dudley (Mrs. Charles T. Dud- 
ley) has discontinued Wabanaki School, which 



she has directed for the last four years. This 
action was taken because the undertaking 
proved too great a tax upon her strength. 

1901 

Class editor, Miss Marion Reilly, 2015 De 
Lancey Place, Philadelphia, Penna. 

1902 

Class editor, Mrs. L. D. Howe, 2400 16th 
Street, N. W., Washington, D. C. 

1903 

Class editor, Mrs. H. K. Smith, Farmington, 
Conn. 

Margretta Stewart Dietrich (Mrs. Charles 
H. Dietrich) has been elected president of the 
Nebraska Woman's Suffrage Association. 

Anna May Branson has announced her en- 
gagement to Brame Hillyard, formerly cattle 
rancher of Alpine, Texas, now editor of Field. 
They will live in England as Mr. Hillyard's 
office will be in London. 

1904 

Class editor, Miss Emma C. Thompson, 213 
South 50th Street, Philadelphia, Penna. 

Eleanor Bliss has just returned from Paris 
where she has been spending some time with 
her father, General Tasker H. Bliss. 

Mary Lamberton is teaching at Easton, 
Penna. 

Margaret Scott has taken a year's leave of 
absence and is studying at Harvard University. 

Daisy Ullman is at the Federal Reserve Bank, 
Chicago, proof reading for the Liberty Bond 
Department. 

1905 

Class editor, Mrs. Ellsworth Huntington, 650 
Canton Ave., Milton, Mass. 

Bertha Seely Dunlop (Mrs. Quincy Dunlop) , 
has a second daughter, Mavis Helen, born July 
9, 1919, at Indianapolis, Ind. 

Isabel Lynde Dammann (Mrs. John Francis 
Dammann, Jr.) has a daughter, Nancy, born 
August 5. 

Elsie P. Jones worked last year in the Home 
Service in Shreveport. This summer she and 
her sister and brother have toured the North- 
west by motor. 

Catherine Utley Hill (Mrs. George Hill) 
climbed Mt. Rainier in August. 



150 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly [November 



Margaret Nichols Hardenbergh (Mrs. Clar- 
ence M. Hardenbergh) walked 175 miles in a two 
weeks' walking trip in Glacier Park this summer. 

Theodora Bates has been working at the New 
York Red Cross headquarters since her work 
ceased at one of the big military hospitals. 

Helen Sturgis has returned from France. 

Florence Waterbury visited her sister in 
Scotland after her work as canteen librarian in 
France was over. 

Helen Griffith has been made associate pro- 
fessor of English at Mt. Holyoke. 

Margaret Thurston Holt (Mrs. Roscoe Holt) 
has a son born August 1. 

Alice Jaynes Tyler (Mrs. Leonard Tyler) 
spent the summer with her two daughters in 
Chatham, Massachusetts. 

Amelia Montgomery Carter (Mrs. Douglas 
Carter) has moved from San Jose, California, to 
East Orange, N. J. 

1906 

Class editor, Mrs. Edward W. Sturdevant, 
1627 16th Street, Washington, D. C. 

Mary Richardson Walcott (Mrs. Robert 
Walcott) spent the summer as usual at Peach 
Point, Marblehead, Mass. 

Beth Harrington Brooks (Mrs. Arthur H. 
Brooks) is spending a month with her mother 
at Ipswich, Mass., before returning to Cam- 
bridge for the winter. The twins are flourishing. 

Ethel de Koven Hudson (Mrs. H. Kierstede 
Hudson) spent two weeks at Newport in August. 

Josephine Bright is settled again for the 
winter at the College Club, Philadelphia. 

Louise Cruice Sturdevant (Mrs. Edward W. 
Sturdevant) is at 1627 16th Street, Washington, 
D. C, for the winter. She will be delighted 
to see any of 1906 who may wander that way. 

Virginia Robinson has been teaching in the 
School for Social Service, Philadelphia. 

Phoebe Crosby Allnutt (Mrs. Severn R. All- 
nutt) has a position at Carson College, Chestnut 
Hill. Her sister is continuing their school. 

Katherine Gano is a probation officer in Cin- 
cinnati, Ohio. 

Augusta French Wallace with her two children, 
Augusta, Jr., and Henry visited Grace Wade 
Levering and Jessie Thomas Bennett last winter. 

Jessie Thomas Bennett (Mrs. Z. Piatt Ben- 
nett) has bought a farm near Wilkes-Barre. 

Grace Neilson LaCosta sailed for America 
with her small daughter, Eleanor in May and 
her son, Blaise followed her at the close of the 



school term in July. She returned to England 
in the autumn. 

Louise Fleischmann was married in New York 
on May 7 to Alfred Barmore Maclay. 

Ethel de Koven Hudson (Mrs. H. Kierstede 
Hudson) and her husband and two small sons 
took a house in Locust Valley, Long Island for 
the summer. 

Adelaide Neall spent her summer vacation in 
Estes Park, Colorado. 

Helen D. Brown Gibbons, ex-'06 (Mrs. 
Herbert Adams Gibbons), has returned to 
America with her children and is living for the 
winter at 12 Boudinot Street, Princeton, New 
Jersey. Mrs. Gibbons did not leave France 
during the five years of war. She saw war 
declared August 1, 1914, and waited until she 
could see the victorious troops passing down 
the Champs Elysees — although the wait was 
long and a fourth baby was born in wartime. 

Esther White was married at the Friends 
Meeting House, Germantown, on October 8, to 
Mr. Theodore Rigg of New Zealand. Mr. Rigg 
was in Russia with the English Friends' Unit 
during the War. 

1907 

Class editor, Mrs. R. E. Ap thorp, care of 
Dr. C. H. Williams, Charles River Road, Cam- 
bridge, Mass. 

1908 

Class Editor, Mrs. William H. Best, 1198 
Bushwick Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Mabel Frehafer received her Ph.D. at Johns 
Hopkins last June. She is working this year 
as assistant physicist in the Bureau of Standards, 
Washington, D. C. 

Mary Cockrell Cockrell (Mrs. Alexander 
Cockrell) has a daughter born during the 
summer. 

Dorothy Dalzell is teaching this year at the 
Brimmer School, in Boston. 

Evelyn Gardner spent the summer at Mt. 
Hermon, Calif. 

Sarah Sanborne Weaver (Mrs. Walter Weaver) 
has a daughter, Sarah Louise, born during 
1908's Tenth Reunion, last June. Sarah is 
demonstrating her unswerving optimism and 
enthusiasm, these days, "roughing it" with her 
family in a very primitive corner of Texas. 

Dorothy Jones attended summer school at 
Columbia University. 

Josephine Proudfit Montgomery entertained 
Anna Dunham Reilly (Mrs. John R. Reilly) 



1919] 



News from the Classes 



151 



and her husband during the summer. Jose- 
phine's husband, Major Dudley Montgomery, 
recently returned from France. 

Grace Woodelton has been doing some inter- 
esting reconstruction work with wounded 
soldiers at the Walter Reed Hospital, Washing- 
ton, D. C. 

Adda Eldredge passed her examination with 
honors, and is now partner in her father's law 
firm in Marquette, Mich. 

Adelaide Case has just returned from a 
recuperative summer in Maine. She plans to 
work at Teacher's College, New York City, 
this winter. 

Ina Richter, M.D., is having a mighty inter- 
esting time as interne in Johns Hopkins Hospital. 

Mayone Lewis is a full-fledged farmer. She 
and a Vassar graduate are running Blithefield 
Farm, at Norwalk, Conn. Between July and 
October they packed thousands of peaches, and 
raised livestock as well. Incidentally, Mayone 
has had several essays published in Harpers 
Monthly. 

Mary Case is a student at Columbia this 
winter. 

Anna Carrere has been doing very interesting 
war work, first in Paris, and now in Washington, 
D.C. 

Anna King is head of the Civilian Relief in 
Boston. To obtain an interview with Anna in 
her office, one must travel first through the 
hands of several score of lesser officials. 

Sarah Goldsmith Aronson (Mrs. Joseph 
Aronson) has resigned from the English Depart- 
ment of the High School at Wilkinsburg, Penna. 
Her husband, Major Aronson, has recently 
returned from France, where he served as 
bacteriologist and liaison officer at a Base 
Hospital in Paris. 

Louise Hyman Pollak (Mrs. Julian Pollak) 
spent the summer at Little Boars Head, New 
Hampshire. 

Agnes Goldman has returned home, after 
serving as bacteriologist with the Red Cross 
Commission in Palestine. 

Tracy Mygatt, in defense of conscientious 
objectors during the war, has written several 
propaganda plays. "Good Friday, A Passion 
Play of Now" (not to be confused, of course, 
with Masefield's "Good Friday") appeared in 
Boston and Chicago. "The Noose" appeared 
in the Neighborhood Playhouse, New York City, 
enjoying a prolonged engagement and crowded 
audiences. At the People's Playhouse both 
Tracy and Fanny May Witherspoon starred in 



a little farce, "Thim Socialists." Tracy is the 
Socialists' choice for Alderman, on their ticket 
this fall. 

Dorothy Strauss has just returned from her 
vacation in Colorado. After her exciting ad- 
ventures in Estes Park, Dorothy finds it hard 
to settle down to the prosaic life of a lawyer on 
Broadway, New York. 

Theresa Helburn has "arrived" as a play- 
wright, having staged several productions on 
Broadway. "Crops and Croppers" was a 
decided success. 

Fanny May Witherspoon is Executive Secre- 
tary of the New York Bureau of Legal Advice. 
F. M. organized this bureau about three years 
ago, and has had her hands full handling some 
big deportation cases and free speech enthusiasts 
who waxed too garrulous during the recent war. 
She is running for State Assemblyman this fall, 
on the Socialist ticket. 

Fanny Passmore is buyer for a big Minneap- 
olis concern, and makes frequent trips to New 
York to study the market. Fanny calls hers a 
"low-brow profession," but apparently she 
thoroughly enjoys it. 

Margaret Washburn Hunt (Mrs. Harold O. 
Hunt) lost her father, John S. Washburn, late 
in September. Mr. Washburn was President 
of the Washburn-Crosby Flour Mills. 

Julius P. Balmer, husband of Louise Congdon 
Balmer died this fall. He was the father of 
1908's Class baby. 

Margaret Steel Duncan was married on Au- 
gust 6 to George Frederick Miller in Philadel- 
phia, Mr. and Mrs. Miller will live in Buck- 
hannon, W. Va. 

1909 

Class editor, Mrs. Anson C. Cameron, 25 East 
Elm Street, Chicago, 111. 

1910 

Class editor, Mrs. H. B. Van Dyne, Troy, 
Penna. 

Louise Merrill is engaged to Mr. Russell 
Bennett. 

Mary Boyd Shipley was married at Haverford 
on September 6 to Mr. Samuel J. Mills of 
Chefoo, China. They will spend the winter 
in New York. 

1911 

Class editor, Miss Margaret J. Hobart, The 
Churchman, 381 Fourth Avenue, New York 
City. 



152 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly [November 



Kate Chambers Seelye (Mrs. Laurens Seelye) 
has put into action her long cherished plan of 
returning to the Near East as a missionary. On 
August 19 she sailed on the S. S. P atria, Fabre 
Line, for Marseilles, accompanied by her 
husband and her two little girls, the youngest 
only a few months old. This is the Rev. Mr. 
Seelye's account of their plans: 

"Kate is busy trying to get ready to sail with 
me on August 19 for Marseilles. When we 
reach that benighted spot we will hang around 
the quays looking for some sea-going bark 
possessing a measure of sanitation, that is head- 
ing itself in the general direction of Italy, Egypt, 
Greece or Syria. Whenever we get to any of 
these places, we shall repeat the process. 
Eventually we will arrive at Beirut, Syria, where 
I am to be a 'lecturer' in philosophy. (A 'lec- 
turer' is simply a gent in between an 'instructor' 
and a 'professor'). We are going out on a 
three year term of service. If we remain longer, 
we will return on a furlough in 1924." 

Mrs. Seelye spent her childhood and much of 
her girlhood in the mission at Adana in Turkey. 
In spite of the hardships through which she and 
her family lived — massacres were not infrequent 
— it has been long her desire to return to the 
foreign mission field. After graduating from 
Bryn Mawr, Mrs. Seelye took her Ph.D. in 
comparative religions at Columbia. She was 
married in 1915. Her husband was pastor of 
the church in Chatham, New Jersey, until he 
entered the national service as chaplain. 

1912 

Class editor, Mrs. J. H. MacDonald, 3227 
North Pennsylvania Street. Indianapolis, Ind. 

The marriage of Margaret Peck to Lieutenant 
Thomas Spring MacEwan took place on Sep- 
tember 17 in Bristol, Conn. 

Mary Scribner Palmer (Mrs. N. Chapin 
Palmer) has a son born in August. 

Gladys Spry returned from France in July 
and has been spending the summer on Cape 
Cod. 

Helen Lautz is assistant to the bursar of 
Mills College, Oakland, Calif. 

Margaret Fabian, ex-' 12 has returned to Evan- 
ston, Illinois, from overseas work as nurses aid 
with the American Red Cross. 

Laura L. Byrne after three years' teaching 
at Dominican Junior College, San Rafael, Cali- 
fornia has returned to Maryland to teach His- 
tory and Economics in the College Department 
of Notre Dame of Maryland in Baltimore. 



While in California, she completed the require- 
ments for the Teacher's recommendation and 
the degree of M.A. at the University of Cali- 
fornia and was awarded the University of 
California Newman Essay prize of $100 for an 
historical essay on Charles Carroll of Carrollton. 

Gladys Chamberlain has announced her 
engagement to Prof. Horace Greeley, of the 
Department of Music of Iowa University. They 
will be married in December. 

Florence Glenn was married on September 
4 to Carl H. Zipf , at Johnstown, Pa. 

1913 

Class editor, Nathalie Swift, 156 East 79th 
Street, New York City. 

Helen Evans Lewis (Mrs. Robert Lewis) 
ex-' 13, has a son, Robert Shippen Lewis, born 
in June. 

Alice Patterson was married on June 28 to 
Mr. Allan Bensinger. Mr. and Mrs. Bensinger 
will live at Narbeth. 

Dorothea Baldwin is on the editorial board 
of The New Republic. 

Cecelia Baechle, is a graduate student at 
Bryn Mawr this year. 

Clara Crocker (Mrs. Courtenay Crocker), 
ex-'13, has a son, born last month. 

1914 

Class editor, Miss Ida Pritchett, School of 
Hygiene and Public Health, Johns Hopkins 
University, Baltimore, Md. 

Elizabeth Baldwin has just returned to 
America, after living several years in France. 
She expects to be married some time this winter 
or next spring. 

Elizabeth Colt Shattuck (Mrs. Howard 
Shattuck) has given up her position with the 
National Bank of Haiti. Dr. and Mrs. Shat- 
tuck will live in New York this winter. 

Catherine Westling died of tubercular men- 
ingitis early in August, at the Germantown 
Hospital. She was ill only a short time. 

Catherine Creighton took her M.D. at the 
Johns Hopkins Medical School last June. She 
is working in the Harriet Lane Home of the 
Johns Hopkins Hospital this winter. 

Edwina Warren, who has been ill in France 
with typhoid, has returned to America. 

Ethel Dunham (M.D., Johns Hopkins 1918) 
is working in a hospital in New Haven this 
winter. 

Harriet Sheldon, ex-'14, is living in Haines, 
Alaska. 



1919] 



News from the Classes 



153 



1915 

Class editor, Miss Katharine W. McCollin, 
2213 St. James Place, Philadelphia, Penna. 

Helen Everett has been on the staff of the 
American Association for Labor Legislation. 
She is to teach Economics at Vassar this winter. 

Alice Humphrey has been doing psychiatric 
work for the New York H. S. S. of the American 
Red Cross. She spent last winter at the V. S. 
General Hospital in Plattsburg. 

Lucille Davidson is Assistant Editor of 
McCalVs Magazine. 

Dorothea May Moore is returning to Johns 
Hopkins to continue her medical studies this 
winter. 

Enid Dessau returned from overseas in July, 
Anne Hardon sometime last spring. 

Cecilia Sargent left for Mexico in September. 
She has been sent there by the Board of Foreign 
Missions of the Presbyterian Church. 

Katharine McCollin is to teach History and 
Science at the Agnes Irwin School, Philadelphia. 

Florence Hatton Kelton is living near Camp 
Humphrey, Va. Her husband is stationed there 
at present. 

Mr. Edred Pennell, Ruth Glenn Pennell's 
husband, is practicing law in Montgomery 
County. The Pennells are living in Bryn Mawr 
in an apartment over the post office. 

Mary Gertrude Brownell Murphy and her 
husband, Dr. Douglas Murphy returned from 
France in June. They are living in Philadelphia 
where Dr. Murphy is practicing medicine. 

Elizabeth Smith has gone to Stanford Uni- 
versity to do graduate work in the School of 
Education. She is living in the Deanery with 
Harriet Bradford. 

Florence Abernethy is Assistant to Sales 
Engineer, Walker Brothers & Haviland, Phil- 
adelphia. 

Laura Branson will return to the Shipley 
School as Head of the Department of Mathe- 
matics. 

Amy Martin is to do graduate work in Eco- 
nomics at Bryn Mawr this winter. 

Pauline Wolf, ex-' 15, has a fellowship in the 
Department of Pathology in the Medical 
School, University of Chicago. 

Cleora Sutch is teaching this winter in Scars- 
dale, New York. 

Mildred Justice has a position with The 
Joseph and Feiss Company, Cleveland, O., where 
she will learn the business from the bottom up. 

Eleanor Freer Willson (Mrs. Ernest Russell 
Willson) has a son, Edward Freer Willson, born 
in September. 



Gertrude Emery is supervisor of physical 
education in Danvers, Mass., this winter. 

Olga Erbsloh sailed on October 8 for Zurich, 
Switzerland where she will study philosophy and 
literature. 

Vashti McCreery is recovering from an attack 
of pneumonia. 

Margaret Free was married on November 18 
to James S. Austin Stone, a patent attorney. 
They will live in Washington. 

Anne Hardon, was married on June 9 to 
Mr. B. C. Pearce. Mr. Pearce served in France 
with the 20th Engineers. 

Miriam Rohrer has announced her engage- 
ment to Captain Joseph Shelby, of Lexington, 
Ky. Captain Shelby was in the Argonne and 
Meuse offensives. 

1916 

Class editor, Mrs. Webb I. Vorys, 1640 East 
Broad Street, Columbus, Ohio. 

1917 

Class editor, Miss Constance Hall, 1755 N 
Street, Washington, D. C. 

Constance Kellen was married to Mr. Roger 
Lee Branham at Cohasset, Mass., on September 
20. 

Rebecca Fordyce was married on the 13 th 
of September to Oscar Francis Gayton. They 
will live in Manila, P. I. 

The wedding of Margaret Chase to Lieut. 
Robert Locke of Haverford took place Sep- 
tember 6. Lieutenant Locke recently returned 
from Siberia. 

Anna Sears was married on June 25 to 
Warren E. Davis, Yale, '10. Margaret Sears 
(Mrs. L. Biglow) was her matron of honor; C. 
Godley, E. Wilson, M. Cordingley, ex-'16, were 
bridesmaids. Mr. and Mrs. Davis are living 
at Worcester, Mass. 

Louise Collins was married on June 18 to 
Nathaniel P. Davis of Princeton. Mr. Davis 
is a brother of Anne Davis. 

Elizabeth S. Granger announces her engage- 
ment to Charles Edward Brown, Jr. of Lake 
Forest, 111., Princeton, '17. Mr. Brown was in 
the aviation during the war and Miss Granger 
was taking the regular nurses training at the 
Pennsylvania Hospital in Philadelphia. The 
wedding will probably be in April. 

1918 

Class editor, Miss Margaret C. Timpson, 
Hotel Devon, 70 West 55th St., New York 
City. 



154 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly [November 



Virginia Anderton is managing a farm of 250 
acres at Sherry, Wis. 

Evelyn Babbitt is private secretary to the 
District Vocational Officer, Division of Rehabil- 
itation, Federal Board for Vocational Education, 
Philadelphia. 

Margaret Bacon is doing committee work in 
Philadelphia. 

Ruth Cheney Streeter, ex-' 18, (IS Irs. Thomas 
Streeter), expects to spend the winter in New 
York. 

Katharine Dufourcq has a position as trans- 
lator with the General Motors Export Company 
of New York. 

Posy Fiske, ex-' 18, is engaged to Harold 
Willis of Boston. 

Veronica Frazier spent two months during the 
summer as a clerk in the New York Times office. 
She is planning to attend the College of Physi- 
cians and Surgeons this winter. 

Mary Gardiner is an information secretary at 
the Hostess House at Camp Mills, N. Y. 

Ruth Hart is Division Manager, Agency 
Bureau of the International Magazine Com- 
pany, New York. 

Laura Heisler, ex-'18, is taking vocal training 
at the Sternberg School, Philadelphia. 

Louise Hodges has been in Hawaii since 
July. 

Teresa Howell expects to be married to Dr. 
Edward O. Halburt, Assistant Professor of 
Physics at Johns Hopkins University, during the 
Christmas holidays. 

Virginia Kneeland carried on an investigation 
at the Marine Biological Laboratory, Woods 
Hole, Mass., during July and August. 

Dorothy Kuhn Minster, ex-' 18, (Mrs. Leonard 
R. Minster) is Educational Director of the 
Social Hygiene Society of Cincinnati. 

Helen Jones is traveling through England, 
Scotland, Norway, Sweden, France and Italy. 
She is expected to return about November 1 . 

Anna Lubar is studying singing and piano in 
Philadelphia. 

Marian O'Connor is doing publicity work for 
the New England Division of the American Red 
Cross. 

Hester Quimby is laboratory assistant in the 
Philadelphia Electric Company. 

Rebecca Rhoads is teaching English in the 
Southfield Point School, Stamford, Conn. 

Helen Schwarz has spent the summer at Loon 
Lake. 

Dorothy Stevenson, ex-' 18, has set the date of 
her wedding to Mr. Harold Ames Clark of Bal- 
timore, for October 1, when she and her husband 



will go to China for a year. Olive Bain Kittle, 
ex-' 18, is to be matron of honor at the wedding. 

Helen Whitcomb is secretary for the New 
England Colleges, Savings Division, Treasury 
Department. 

Majorie Williams was married on June 30 to 
Capt. John W. McCullough. Her address is 
2201 Thirty-third Street, Galveston, Texas. 

Helen Wilson has announced her engagement 
to Dr. William Jackson Merrill of Philadelphia. 
She is at present traveling in the Orient. 

Mary Winsor, ex-' 18, was married on Sep- 
tember 15. 

Helen Butterfield was married to Captain 
James Williams on May 28. 

Jeanette Ridlon was married on August 19 
to Dr. Jean Piccard, Professor of Chemistry 
at Lausanne. Dr. Piccard was at Chicago Uni- 
versity last year. Dr. and Mrs. Piccard sailed 
for Switzerland on September 5. 

1919 

Class editor, Mary E. Tyler, 165 Lake Avenue, 
Greenwich, Conn. 

Frances Day is studying architecture at the 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 

Mary Lee Thurman and Anna Thorndike 
are going to France to do reconstruction work 
with the Committee for Devastated France. 

Elizabeth Lanier is to be instructor in athletics 
at Rosemary Hall this winter. 

Cornelia Hayman has announced her engage- 
ment to Loring Van Dam. 

Louise Wood is secretary of the Country Day 
School in Winnetka, 111. 

Beatrice Sorchan is working in the office of 
the Social Unit Plan in New York City. 

Dorothea Chambers is studying for an M.A. 
degree at Columbia prior to taking a position 
next year in the Near East. 

Gordon Woodbury is planning to work in a 
publishing house in New York City. 

Mary Tyler is teaching in the Rosemary Pre- 
paratory School at Rosemary Hall. 

Elizabeth Biddle is secretary of the Young 
Friends Movement, Philadelphia Meeting. 

The marriage of Winifred Kaufman to Eugene 
C. Whitehead took place at Evanston, 111., on 
August 28. 

Sarah Taylor was married on July 28 to Dr. 
lames Vernon. Elizabeth Fuller and Theo- 
dosia Haynes were bridesmaids. 

The wedding of Alice Rubelraan, ex-' 19, and 
Mr. Ben Knight took place on October 18 at 
St. Louis. A. Dubach and J. Holmes were 
bridesmaids. 



1919] 



Bryn Mawr Authors and Their Books 



155 



BRYN MAWR AUTHORS AND THEIR BOOKS 



Letters from a French Soldier to His 
Mother {1914-1915). 
Translated from the French by H. R. P. 

I talked the other day with a robust young 
farmer who managed to freeze his feet after 
the armistice, but who had come unhurt through 
Chateau Thierry and the Argonne. I asked 
him to tell me about it. "Well," he said, slowly 
and consideringly, "all but my feet it went off 
lovely." I suppose that an ant-hill pulls itself 
together after a catastrophe with an ease we 
cannot emulate, because the average citizen of 
that strong society reacts just about as simply 
as this. 

But consider the French soldier. The letters, 
are, I assume, genuine. Miss Palmer, who has 
translated them so sympathetically, has evi- 
dently no doubt about this, and I should not 
have either, if over and above all the legitimate 
excellencies that real letters are capable of, they 
had not a completeness of presentation, obtained 
by a delicacy of touch, that we generally get 
only from a fiction of the most successful art, 
worked over and over so that the beginning is 
reconsidered after the end is written. We can 
only say that the French are like that. The 
letters tell the story of a young man born and 
bred in the air of art, of subtlety, of self-con- 
sciousness, of analysis, of criticism, of doubt, — 
preoccupied with the things that exist only 
when society is in order. In the French fashion, 
his dearest friend and most sympathetic confi- 
dante is his mother. He even runs to a grand- 
mother; and these three are sufficient to each 
other. The soldier is twenty-eight years old. 
He is an artist. His education has been inter- 
rupted but he is an intellectual. The books 
they have read and the music they have heard 
form a means of expression between him and 
his mother. Nothing that touches his senses 
is lost on them. But the groundwork of his 
mind is appreciation of the natural world, its 
obvious and its occult beauties and its mystic 
message. Maurice de Guerin and Amiel are 
the types one relates him with. Now place 
this young man on the Cotes de la Meuse during 
the winter of 1914-15 and what will become 
of him? 

Using only his own phrases we have a clear 
view of his mind. Formerly he loved France 
with a love that was sincere if a trifle dilettante. 
He loved her as an artist, proud of her many- 



sided beauty, but a little as a picture might 
love its frame. When he saw a monstrous paw 
clutching at this fair land whose beauty was 
her offense, he became instantly conscious of 
the deep strong bond that tied him to her, and 
of his role as a member of society. He had 
no militaristic ardour. A year before the war 
he was delighted to find himself relieved from 
military duty; it seemed to him then that his 
life and prospects would be ruined if he were 
forced to rejoin his regiment. "And now be- 
hold me once more back in the army, far from 
my work, from my cares and ambitions; yet 
never has life yielded such a wealth of noble 
emotions; never in particular have I felt such 
security of conscience." For him, life was 
greatly simplified by being raised to great 
intensity. "Our life resembles that of the 
early monks; rude, monastic discipline, without 
responsibility." "We spend our days like chil- 
dren : and such indeed we have become. Fortu- 
nately the war will bring one blessing. Those 
who are to return will come back young at 
heart." "The lack of material comforts does 
not weigh upon my spirits. We lead the life of 
hares during the hunting season, and yet we 
have wonderful opportunities for enriching the 
mind." "What Tolstoi makes you feel is 
that the soldier has ample opportunity for 
reflection." 

The reflections of this soldier had for their 
material an unfailing heady joy in acute sense 
perception. On outpost duty he has time to 
note that while in one direction nothing is 
visible but flame and ruin, a glance in the other 
shows "some houses, dim in the mist, preserving 
the delicate blacks" of Corot. "There is only a 
certain amount of wickedness in the world. 
When all of it is reserved by man for man, the 
wild animals profit." "if you could only know 
what security the field-mice enjoy! The other 
day, from my leafy shelter, I watched the evo- 
lutions of these small animals. They were as 
pretty as a Japanese print, their ears pink as 
shells." 

As mud and sleeplessness and the constant 
presence of death get in their work, the philos- 
ophy of pain occupies our young man more and 
more. "We have tasted the honey of civiliza- 
tion, a poisoned honey, no doubt! .... 
Order leads to habitual repose. Violence 
arouses dormant activities It is a 



156 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly [November 



little as if some molten substance solidified too 
quickly and in an imperfect form. It becomes 
necessary to make a new mould." 

"Further sacrifice would be superhuman. It 
is impossible to pass beyond the point we have 
already reached. Give up every human hope. 
Seek something else, perhaps you have found it. 
. . . . I have tried to gather some flowers 
in the mud." 

"The death of a soldier is a natural thing 
and accords with the violence of nature." 

"During our life in the open we have gained 
a liberty of conception, a breadth of view, that 
will make cities seem horrible and artificial to 
those who return." 

The first letter is dated September 5 and the 
last, April 6. It says, "At noon we form the 
advanced outpost and are waiting to attack. 
I send you all my love. Come what will, we 
shall have known beauty " 

Miss Palmer in putting these letters into 
delightful English, has given us a glimpse of 
the heart of France that, brief as it is, helps 
us to formulate the logic of the instinct that 
brought us into the war. Everyone who lives 



by the spirit must feel that for the welfare of 
the world it is necessary that France should 
live and prosper. She will recover from her 
wounds more rapidly than we can imagine, and 
make again her contribution of beauty to our 
common life. 

"Dear mother, those regrets for my Tower 
of Ivory were unworthy. May a better spirit 
lead me to recognize the blessings of storms 
that bear one from a too safe harbour, and that, 
in unforgettable moments, have made of me 
a man." 

E. J. P., '89. 

IN THE PERIODICALS 

Lucy Martin Donnelly, '93, had an article 
entitled "The Sage of Shantung" in The New 
Republic for October 1. 

"Marshal Foch: an Intimate Portrait" by 
Baron Andre de Maricourt which appeared in 
the October issue of Harper's Magazine was 
translated by Helen Davenport Gibbons, ex-'06. 

Mayone Lewis, '08, has a whimsical essay 
called "The Choice of a Mate" in Harper's 
Magazine for August. 



The Shipley School 

Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania 



Preparatory to Bryn Mawr College 



Alice G. Howland, 
Eleanor 0. Brownell, 

Principals. 

LAKEWOOD HALL 

LAKEWOOD, N. J. 

A College Preparatory School for 

Girls. Carefully planned 

General Courses 

Principal 

Lisa B. Converse, 

A.B. Bryn Mawr College 

THE MISSES KIRK'S 
College Preparatory School 

Bryn Mawr Ave. and Old Lancaster Road 
Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Number of boarders limited. Com- 
bines advantages of school life with 
private instruction. Individual schedule 
arranged for each pupil. 

All teachers thoroughly familiar with 
college preparatory work. Frequent 
examinations by Bryn Mawr College 
professors. 

Gymnastics and outdoor games. 



The Baldwin School 

A Country School Bryn Mawr 

for Girls Pennsylvania 

Ten miles from Philadelphia. Fire- 
proof Stone Building. Outdoor Gym- 
nasium. Winter Basketball Field, 
Outdoor and Indoor Classrooms. 
Extensive Grounds. 
Preparation for Bryn Mawr, Mount Holyoke, 
Smith, Vassar and Wellesley colleges. Also 
a strong general course. Wi thin 2 6 years 2 7 2 
students from this school have entered Bryn 
Mawr College. Abundant outdoor life — 
hockey, basketball, tennis, riding. 

Elizabeth Forrest Johnson, A.B., 
Head of the School 



MISS MADEIRA'S SCHOOL 
1 330 1 9th St., N. W . Washington, D. C . 



A Resident and Day School 
for Girls 

LUCY MADEIRA WING, A.B. 

MRS. DAVID LAFOREST WING 
Head Mistress 



MISS BEARD'S SCHOOL 

Situated in one of the most healthful and 
beautiful of the New York suburbs, 
Orange, N. J. This school offers the 
advantages of country and city alike. 

College Preparatory, Special, and Grad- 
uate Courses. Gymnasium, Music 
and Art Studios. Domestic Arts. 

Write for Illustrated Catalogue 

Address 

Miss Lucie C. Beard Orange, N. J. 



The Ethel Walker School, Inc. 

SIMSBURY, CONNECTICUT 

Head of School 

ETHEL M. WALKER 

A.M. BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 



Kindly mention the Quarterly 

z 



St. Timothy's School for Girls 



CATONSVILLE. MD. 



Re-opened September, 1919 
Closes June. 1920 



Prepares for College, preferably 
Bryn MawT 



MISS WRIGHTS SCHOOL 
FOR GIRLS 

Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Prepares for Bryn Mawr with certifi- 
cate privileges for other 
colleges 



Rosemary Hall 

Founded 1890 

No elective courses 

Prepares for college 

Preferably Bryn Mawr 

Caroline Ruutz-Rees, Ph.D.) •, ju-. 
Mary E. Lowndes, Litt.D. } Head M » tre88e » 

GREENWICH. CONNECTICUT 



THE AGNES IRWIN SCHOOL 

201 1 DE LANCEY PLACE 
PHILADELPHIA 

Prepares for Bryn Mawr, Smith, 
Vassar and Wellesley 
Colleges 



JOSEPHINE A. NATT. Head-Mistress 
BERTHA M. LAWS. Secretary-Treasurer 



MISS COWLES' SCHOOL FOR GIRLS 

(Highland Hall) 
Emma Milton Cowles, A.B., Head of School 

Preparatory to Bryn Mawr, Welles- 
ley, Vassar, Smith and Mount Hol- 
yoke. Certificate privilege. Also 
strong general course. Music, Art, 
and Domestic Science. Healthful 
location, 1000 feet altitude. New 
sleeping porch. Gymnasium, swim- 
ming pool. Catalogue. 

Address the Secretary 
Pennsylvania - - Hollidaysburg 



Rogers Hall School for girls 



FACES ROGERS FORT HILL PARK 



38 MINUTES FROM BOSTON 



HpHOROUGH preparation for Bryn Mawr and other colleges. Rogers 
Hall is now represented in Bryn Mawr, Radcliffe, Smith, Vassar, 
Wellesley, University of Wisconsin, and University of Chicago. Large 
grounds for outdoor sports. Experienced instructors in charge of all 
athletics. New Gymnasium and Swimming Pool. For catalogue, address 

MISS OLIVE SEWALL PARSONS, Principal LOWELL, MASS. 



Kindly mention the Quarterly 



By a Bryn Mawr Graduate 




PARIS VISTAS 




By HELEN DAVENPORT GIBBONS 
Author of "A Little Gray Home in France, " etc. 

A BOOK beautifully made and beautifully written. In it breathes 
r\ the spirit of the world's Capital, the city most loved by all the 
"*" ^ nations. A charming gift book. 

It is Paris seen and felt by an extraordinarily sensitive and sym- 
pathetic nature in four stages of her development — as a little girl 
going about with her governess, as a young lady interpreting the 
world independently, as a young wife dreaming dreams in the Latin 
Quarter, and finally as a mother living in Paris during the four years 
of war. 

Illustrated with 16 exquisite full-page pen-and-ink drawings done 
in Paris by Lester G. Hornby especially for the book, and reproduced 
in tint. 

8vo. 396 pages. Price $3.50 

At All Booksellers TPU17 rTTXTTPTTDV CCl 353 Fourth Avenue 
Published by 1 tlEj t-JLlM 1 UK 1 L.U. New York City 

(A postcard request will bring our new illustrated holiday catalogue.) 



After College WHAT? 

ATHLETICS 



The Intercollegiate Alumnae Athletic Association in 
New York City offers college graduates opportunities 
for basket-ball, gymnasium work, swimming, riding, 
tennis, et cetera. 

Membership Fee $2.00 



Register through or request information from 

Sarah E. Loth, Executive Secretary 

119 West 74th Street New York City 




The "Constitution" of To-day — Electrically Propelled 



THE U. S. S. "New Mexico," the first battle- 
ship of any nation to be electrically pro- 
pelled, is one of the most important achievements 
of the scientific age. She not only develops the 
maximum power and, with electrical control, 
has greater flexibility of maneuver, which is a 
distinct naval advantage, but 
also gives greater economy. 
At 10 knots, her normal cruis- 
ing speed, she will steam on 
less fuel than the best turbine- 
driven ship that preceded her. 



Figures that tell the 
Story of Achievement 



The electric generating plant, 
totaling 28,000 horsepower, 
and the propulsion equipment 
of the great super-dreadnaught 
were built by the General Elec- 
tric Company. Their operation has demonstrated 
the superiority of electric propulsion over old- 
time methods and a wider application of this 
principle in the merchant marine is fast mak- 
ing progress. 



Length— 624 feet 

Width— 97 feet 

Displacement— 32,000 tons 

Fuel capacity— a million gal- 
lons (fuel oil) 

Power— 28,000 electrical horse- 
power 

Speed— 21 knots. 



Six auxiliary General Electric Turbine-Gener- 
ators of 400 horsepower each, supply power 
for nearly 500 motors, driving pumps, fans, 
shop machinery, and kitchen and laundry appli- 
ances, etc. 

Utilizing electricity to propel ships at sea marks 
the advancement of another 
phase of the electrical indus- 
try in which the General Elec- 
tric Company is the pioneer. 
Of equal importance has been 
its part in perfecting electric 
transportation on land, trans- 
forming the potential energy 
of waterfalls for use in elec- 
tric motors, developing the 
possibilities of electric light- 
ing and many other similar achievements. 

As a result, so general are the applications of 
electricity to the needs of mankind that scarcely 
a home or individual today need be without the 
benefits of General Electric products and service. 



An illustrated booklet describing the "New Mexico/' entitled, 
"The Electric Ship," will be sent upon request. Address 
General Electric Company, Desk 44, Schenectady, New York. 




General Office 
Schenectacly,N.Y. 




Sales Offices in 
all large cities. 






RYN MAWR 
ALUMNAE 



'QUARTERLY 




Vol. XIV JANUARY, 1920 No. 1 



Endowment Campaign Under Way 

Annual Meeting of Alumnae Association 

New School Succeeds 

Another Look at New York 



Published by the Alumnae Association 

of 
Bryn Mawr College 



THE BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE 
QUARTERLY 

Editor-in-Chief 
Isabel Foster, '15 
Bryn Mawr y Penn. 

TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Endowment Campaign Under Way 1 

Annual Meeting of Alumnae Association 3 

New School Succeeds 8 

Another Look at New York 8 

In Memoriam . . 10 

News from the Campus 10 

News from the Clubs 12 

News from the Classes 13 

Bryn Mawr Authors and Their Books 20 

Contributions to the Quarterly, books for review, and subscriptions should be sent to 
the Editor-in-Chief, Isabel Foster, Taylor Hall, Bryn Mawr, Penn. Cheques should be 
drawn payable to Bertha S. Ehlers, Taylor Hall, Bryn Mawr, Penn. The Quarterly 
is published in January, April, July and November of each year. The price of subscription 
is one dollar a year, and single copies are sold for twenty-five cents each. Any failure 
to receive numbers of the Quarterly should be reported promptly to the Editor. Changes 
of address should be reported to the Editor not later than the first day of each month 
of issue. News items may be sent to the Editors. 



Copyright, iqiq, by the Alumnae Association of Bryn Mawr College 




Caroline McCormick Slade 



THE BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE 
QUARTERLY 



VOLUME XIV 



JANUARY, 1920 



No. 1 



ENDOWMENT CAMPAIGN UNDER WAY 

NATIONAL HEADQUARTERS DIRECTS WORK OF ALUMNAE IN RAISING 

TWO MILLION FUND 



We're off! National organization for the 
Two Million Dollar Endowment campaign is 
running ahead full speed. General head- 
quarters at 124 East 28th Street, New York in 
a few weeks will reach every state in the union 
and every alumna and former student of the 
college. 

Caroline McCormick Slade, (Mrs. F. Louis 
Slade), ex-'96, national chairman is at the helm. 
She brings to the campaign the experience of 
chairman, Woman's Division, War Personnel 
Board of the Y. M. C. A., the enthusiasm and in- 
spiration of her own personality. She is build- 
ing up an organization of workers who repre- 
sent every class and every type of Bryn Mawr 
alumnae. Her national executive committee is 
formed of the following women: 

Frances Fincke Hand (Mrs. Learned Hand), 
'97, alumnae director of Bryn Mawr is the vice 
chairman. Mrs. Hand is a trustee of the 
Brearley school and has taken an active part in 
civic work in New York City, being from 1915 
to 1917 president of the Woman's City Club of 
that city. 

Louise Congdon Francis (Mrs. Richard S. 
Francis), '00, president of the alumnae asso- 
ciation since 1918 is the third member of the 
national executive committee. Mrs. Francis 
probably knows as many alumnae as any mem- 
ber of the association and knows better than 
any one else the interest alumnae have taken in 
the college in recent years. 

Frances Browne, '09, has been appointed 
chairman of canvassers and will keep office 
hours at national headquarters where she will 
be in closest contact with all the districts. 

Bertha Ehlers, '09, executive secretary of the 



alumnae association and treasurer of the as- 
sociation, as secretary of the joint committee 
for the endowment campaign has most complete 
knowledge not only of the alumnae and of the 
alumnae clubs, but also of the development of 
the campaign from its first suggestion. She 
has been at her office in Taylor Hall, Bryn 
■ Mawr, since last spring, but will spend several 
days every week for the next month or two in 
New York to work on organization. 

Cora Hardy Jarrett (Mrs. Edwin S. Jarrett), 
holder of the European fellowship for the class 
of '99 has been appointed chairman of publicity 
and will be found daily at the national head- 
quarters. 

Helen Sturgis, '05, is treasurer for the cam- 
paign. She has recently returned from France 
where she was working for the American Red 
Cross. 

Julia Duke Henning (Mrs. Samuel C Henn- 
ing), ex. '97, is chairman for the South. 

Mr. Charles Rhoads is a member of the 
national executive committee on behalf of the 
directors of the college. 

Professor Arthur L. Wheeler is a member of 
the committee to represent the faculty of the 
college. 

M. Millicent Carey, president of the senior 
class, and Darthela Clark, president of the 
Undergraduate Association, have been made 
representatives of the undergraduates on the 
executive committee. 

The picture accompanying this article shows 
the New York office with Margaret Blanchard, 
'14, in the foreground. An inner office is Mrs. 
Slade's own. Two other offices in the same 
suite are used for publicity and stenographers. 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[January 



Mrs. Slade will be glad to welcome to head- 
quarters any alumnae who are in New York and 
would like to hear details about the campaign. 
The office is on the sixth floor at 124 East 28th 
street, telephone Madison Square 9391 Bryn 
Mawr Endowment. 

The John Price Jones Corporation, 165 Broad- 
way, New York City, has been engaged as or- 
ganization and publicity counsel. This cor- 
poration has laid out the general plan of or- 
ganization for the entire campaign, the plan of 
operation and will give advice on matters of 
policy as the campaign progresses. It is also 
to prepare pamphlets, lay out plans for features 
and handle every kind of publicity work con- 
nected with the campaign. 

COST OF CAMPAIGN 

While it is not possible to give final figures as 
to the cost of the campaign at present, it is safe 
to say that the expense will not exceed two per 
cent of the two millions to be raised. The 
Harvard campaign cost about one per cent of 
the fifteen million goal. The percentage for the 
Bryn Mawr campaign is larger because the 
total is so much less. Much more than suf- 
ficient has already been given to cover the 
cost of the campaign. 

Headquarters for the campaign in October 
were in the Alumnae Room, Taylor Hall, the 
north tower room on the fourth floor which 
has been given the association by the college 
and furnished by the kindness of President 
Thomas. This office is still the association 
headquarters and Miss Elders' permanent ad- 
dress. The business of the association is all 
done from this office. 

By the end of October it became imperative 
that the endowment office should have a sepa- 
rate room. The college most kindly turned 
Room A, Taylor Hall from a class room to one 
of the pleasantest offices on the campus. Rugs 
and wicker arm chairs give the room a com- 
fortable appearance and the original pictures 
for the college calendars of 1901 and 1902 by 
Jessie Wilcox Smith and Elizabeth Shippen 
Green give it the Bryn Mawr touch. 

The Joint Committee engaged Miss Ernestine 
Evans as a temporary publicity director in 
September. E. Buckner Kirk, '16, spent two 
weeks at the time of the opening of college as- 
sisting Miss Evans. Pauline Clarke, '12, for- 
merly editor of The Suffragist worked on 
publicity throughout October. 



The visit of Elisabeth, Queen of the Belgians 
was the most spectacular publicity of the au- 
tumn. This was accomplished largely through 
Miss Evans. Arrangements were made for the 
publication of magazine articles, many stories 
were sent to the newspapers and moving pic- 
tures were taken of the Queen's visit and of 
Miss Taf t. 

BRYN MAWR BUREAU 

When Miss Clark was forced to leave, Isabel 
Foster, '15, editor of The Alumnae Quarterly 
and day reporter on The Waterbury Republican, 
Waterbury, Conn., was engaged to take her 
place. Miss Foster has established an Endow- 
ment bureau of information where all news of 
current events on the campus, alumnae and en- 
dowment items for The College News and in- 
formation for the national publicity department 
are handled. Reporters, photographers and 
moving picture men are being made welcome and 
personally guided to the right news and the right 
pictures. 

Although the organization work and the busi- 
ness of receiving gifts is now all done at the New 
York office, the Bryn Mawr office is very busy. 
Mrs. Francis, president of the association is at 
the office every day. Entertainments are ar- 
ranged there, as for example speeches by the 
faculty in various cities during the Christmas 
vacation, Maeterlinck's first public lecture in 
Philadelphia, a banquet at the Ritz in Phila- 
delphia on January 28 at which the guests of 
honor were William Howard Taft, and Prof. 
Caroline F. E. Spurgeon. 

MAY DAY TO BE GIVEN 

Far and away the most important enter- 
tainment of the year, May Day, will probably 
be managed from this office. The undergrad- 
uates have voted by a large majority to give 
May Day for the benefit of the Endowment 
Fund. They have asked Mrs. Otis Skinner to 
be the general director, and she has been invited 
to have her headquarters in the Endowment 
Bureau room because of its convenient location. 
The business manager of May Day who has not. 
been appointed yet, will also be invited to have 
her desk in the office. 

Elizabeth Vincent, '23, has been elected chair- 
man of the Central May Day committee. The 
other members are Helen Hill for the Juniors, 
Cornelia Skinner for the Sophomores, Eliza- 



1920] 



Annual Meeting 



beth Bright for the Freshman and Amy Martin, 
Bryn Mawr '15 for the graduates. Darthela 
Clark, president of the Undergraduate Associ- 
ation is ex-omcio a member. 

In preparation for the final vote on the ques- 
tion of giving May Day, several alumnae spoke 
to the undergraduates at a mass meeting held in 
the chapel on November 18. They were Lucy 
Martin Donnelly, '93; Myra Elliot Vauclain 
(Mrs. Jacques Vauclain), '08, and Marion 
Reilly, '01. Lantern slides and photographs 
were shown. 

May Day is to be the great contribution of the 
undergraduates to the Two Million Dollar En- 
dowment Fund. Every student will give time 
and thought to the campaign. 

DISTRICT ORGANIZATION 

Through thorough district organization it is 
expected that every alumna will also want to 
do something very definite for the college. The 
country has been divided in a general way into 
zones. Every zone will have a chairman with 
local chairmen under her who in turn will have 
a chairman of canvassers, a chairman of esti- 
mates, a chairman of men's committee and 
a chairman of publicity. Under the chairman 
of canvassers will be teams of ten, each with 
its captain. 

The skeleton outline to date follows: 



VICTORY CHAIR 

The executive committee of the campaign 
trust that a large amount of the total endow- 
ment may be raised through gifts for chairs in 
particular departments. It is recommended to 
the alumnae association by the finance commit- 
tee and the board of directors that the $100,000 
which is being raised for the Victory Chair of 
French be considered a part of the Two Million 
Dollar Endowment fund. At the first of Janu- 
ary a balance of $30,000 still remained to be 
raised. The fund will be turned over to the 
college as soon as it is complete, the interest 
to pay the salary of the present professor of 
French, releasing the money now used for this 
to increase other teaching salaries. 

SHAW MEMORIAL 

The Anna Howard Shaw Memorial Chair in 
Politics is somewhat similar to the Victory 
Chair. It will be a part of the Two Million 
Dollar Fund. It is being raised however by 
a separate organization of which Edna Fischel 
Gellhorn '00 is the national chairman. In 
every district and local division there is a Shaw 
organization working hand in hand with the 
Endowment committee. In addition to alum- 
nae, leading suffragists in every district are tak- 
ing a share in the work of raising the memorial. 



ANNUAL MEETING OF ALUMNAE 
ASSOCIATION 

EXPECT RECORD-BREAKING MEETING 



The annual meeting of the Alumnae Asso- 
ciation will open on Saturday afternoon, Janu- 
ary 31, with a business meeting. There will be 
no meeting in the morning as has been the cus- 
tom in the past and the regular business of the 
year will be transacted in an hour. Unless 
special requests are made, only the report of the 
board of directors will be read aloud, the other 
reports being published in the April Alumnae 
Quarterly. The directors' report will sum- 
marize all that has been done in the year and 
make plain the situation which must be under- 
stood before new business can be undertaken. 

The election of a member of the academic 
committee and of the officers of the Alumnae 
Association will be announced. The ballot 
reads: 

OFFICERS OF THE ASSOCIATION 

For the Term of Office 1920-1922 
(Vote for one candidate for each office) 



President 
Elizabeth Bent Clark, '95 
Louise Congdon Francis, '00 

Vice-President 
Sylvia Scudder Bowditch, '99 
Leila Houghteling, '11 

Recording Secretary 
Leila R. Stoughton, '98 
Myra Elliot Vauclain, '08 
Corresponding Secretary 
Katharine W. McCollin, '15 
Mary G. Branson, '16 

Treasurer 
Margaret Bontecou, '09 
Bertha S. Ehlers, '09 
Nominated by the Nominating Committee. 

ACADEMIC COMMITTEE 

For the Term of Office 1920-1924 
(Vote for one candidate) 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[January 



Eleanor Louisa Lord, A.B. Smith College, 
1887, and A.M. 1890; Ph.D., Bryn Mawr Col- 
lege, 1898, subjects, History and Political Sci- 
ence. Fellow in History, Bryn Mawr College, 
1889-90, 1895-96; Instructor in History, Smith 
College, 1890-94; Holder of the European Fel- 
lowship of the Women's Educational Associa- 
tion of Boston, and Student in History, Newn- 
ham College, University of Cambridge, England 
1894-95; Instructor in History, Goucher College 
1897-1901, Associate Professor, 1901-04, and 
Professor of History 1904-11; President of the 
History Teachers' Association of the Middle 
States and Maryland, and President of the His- 
tory Teachers' Association of Maryland, 1908-09; 
Dean of Goucher College, and Professor of 
History, 1911, 1911-17; Member Recognition 
Committee A. C. A. 1916. Chairman Public 
Speaking Campaign for Maryland of A. C. A. 
1917-18; Chairman Educational Committee for 
Patudic Propaganda in Baltimore Schools, 
1917-18; Member Maryland Women's Council 
of Defense, 1917-19; Courses in Advanced 
Psychology ,*Philosophy of Education, Problems 
of Advisers of Women Teachers College, Co- 
lumbia University, 1919-20; President Advisers' 
Club of Teachers' College, 1919-20. 

Eleanor Fleisher Riesman, prepared by 
Miss Hayward's School, Philadelphia. Holder 
of the First Bryn Mawr Matriculation Scholar- 
ship for Pennsylvania and the Southern States, 
1899-00; Holder of Maria L. Eastman Brooke 
Hall Memorial Scholarship, 1902-03. A.B., 
1903, group, English and German. Holder of 
the Bryn Mawr European Fellowship, and 
Graduate Student, Bryn Mawr College, 1903- 
04; Chairman of Executive Committee, Neigh- 
bours' Guild, 1904-06; Graduate Student, 
Bryn Mawr College, 1906-07; Vice-Chairman, 
Councilmanic Committee of Women's League 
for Good Government, 1914-15. Hospital, 
social and civic work, 1904-18. 

Nominated by the Board of Directors, Janu- 
ary 1, 1920. 

The Two Million Dollar Campaign for Endow- 
ment will become the business of the meeting 
at 3 o'clock. The alumnae will ratify their par- 
ticipation in the campaign, they will make dis- 
position of the Victory Chair in French, they 
will ratify expenses of the campaign, hear a 
report from Edna Fischel Gellhorn, '00, chair- 
man of the Shaw Memorial and from the dis- 
trict chairmen on the progress of the campaign. 

Acting President Taf t and the directors of the 
college will entertain the alumnae at supper in 
Pembroke Hall that evening to meet Mrs. F. 
Louis Slade and the district chairmen. 



The faculty of the college have invited the 
members of the alumnae association to a musi- 
cal tea in Rockefeller Hall on Sunday afternoon. 

The service school for the campaign will be 
held on Monday under the direction of Mrs. 
Slade. 

It is expected that many classes will plan 
informal reunions at the college at this time and 
that those who attend the Saturday meeting 
will stay until Tuesday. 

ASSOCIATION BUSINESS 

Leila Hough teling, '11, was appointed vice- 
president of the alumnae association for the 
rest of the year in October by the board of di- 
rectors. Miss Houghteling succeeded Johanna 
Kroeber Mosenthal, '00, who resigned. 

The board at the same time appointed Myra 
Elliot Vauclain, '08, recording secretary of the 
association to fill the term of Hilda Worthington 
Smith, '10, who resigned when she became a 
member of the administrative staff of the college. 

Appointments to standing committees were 
made by the board of directors at the November 
meeting as follows: 

Conference Committee: Eleanor Fleisher Ries- 
man, '03; Mary Peirce, '12; Laura Branson, 
'15, and Rebecca Reinhardt, '19, (term: 1919- 
20). 

James E. Rhoads Scholarship Committee: 
Anne Hampton Todd, '02 (term: 1920-23); 
Mary Christine Smith, '14 (term: 1919-21). 

NEW MEMBERS INVITED 

The board of directors of the alumnae asso- 
ciation voted at its regular meeting on Novem- 
ber 21 to include as associate members all former 
undergraduates who have pursued courses of 
study at Bryn Mawr college for at least two 
consecutive semesters and whose classes have 
graduated. 

These associate members are entitled to all 
the privileges of full membership except the 
power of voting and the right to hold office. 
Annual dues, which are two dollars for both full 
and associate members, covers the subscription 
to The Alumnae Quarterly. The life mem- 
bership fee is $40. 

A letter to this effect was mailed to all former 
undergraduates who are not associate members 
and who fall under the ruling. This action was 
taken by the board of directors in the belief 
that a great many former students would be 
glad to keep in touch with the college and they 
had not made the connection in the past because 
of the formalities which had to be undergone. 



1920] Annual Meeting 



CAMPAIGN DEDICATION 

Unlike the campaigns of other colleges, which have had 
a diversity of needs, Bryn Mawr is seeking its $2,000,000 
endowment for the sole purpose of raising the salaries of 
its professors. 

A college is only as good as its teaching staff. 

Bryn Mawr is and has been from the beginning a college 
of the first rank. Its faculty has made it so. Its past work 
has been worthy of the ideals of its founder. Its future 
service should be maintained on the same level, and, if 
possible, on a higher one, for never was there a time when 
the world had greater need of highly developed young men 
and women — developed not only mentally but spiritually 
as well. 

This service Bryn Mawr can continue to give without 
new buildings, without new equipment, without many other 
highly desirable aids, but it cannot continue to do work of 
the highest and most inspiring type without fine and 
inspiring teachers. 

With the high attainment of Bryn Mawr as their inspira- 
tion, with the vision of still greater achievement and service 
before them, the workers for this $2,000,000 endowment 
dedicate themselves to the task. 

— PRELIMINARY PLAN BULLETIN 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[January 



NATIONAL ORGANIZATION 

Complete to January 10, 1920 



ZONE 


STATES OR DISTRICTS 


STATE OR DISTRICT 
CHAIRMEN 


LOCAL DIVISIONS 


LOCAL CHAIRMEN 


f 


Maine 

New Hampshire 

Vermont 

Massachusetts 

Rhode Island 

Connecticut 

New York 
New Jersey 


f Katherine 
< Williams 
[ Hodgdon, 13 

Sylvia Scudder 
Bowditch, '99 

Katherine 
Williams 
Hodgdon, '13 

r 


















1. Margaret Blaine, 
'13, Chairman 


Boston < 


Elizabeth Ayer 
Katharine Page 
Loring 


2. Louise Fleisch- 
mann Maclay, 
'06, Chairman 


Hartford 

New Haven 

Greenwich 

Western 

New York City 


Gertrude Diet- 
rich Smith 

Evangeline Walk- 
er Andrews 




Ivonne 

Stoddard / 
Hayes, '13 \ 






Katrina Ely Tiffany, 
'97, Shaw Memo- 






rial Chairman 








3. Elizabeth B. f 
Kirkbride, '96, j 
Chairman 


Pennsylvania 
Delaware 

Maryland 
District of Co- 
lumbia 
Virginia 
West Virginia 

North Carolina 

South Carolina 

Georgia 

Florida 

Kentucky 

Tennessee 

Alabama 

Louisiana 

Mississippi 

Ohio 

Indiana 
Michigan 


Alice Scatter- 
good Hoag, / 
'13 \ 
Elizabeth N. 
Bancroft, '98 

Olga Kelly, '13 


Philadelphia 
and vicinity 


Gertrude Ely, '00 


4. Amy Steiner, 


Baltimore 


Olga Kelly 


'99, Chairman 
















, 
























5. Julia Duke Hen- 
ning, '97, 












































6. Ruth Strong, '03, ; 
Chairman 


Ruth Strong I 


Cleveland 
Columbus 
Cincinnati 


Alice P. Gan- 
nett, '18 


8 

















1920] 



Annual Meeting 






9. Susan Follansbee 
Hibbard, '97, 
Chairman 



Mary^Foulke Morris- 
son, '99, Shaw 
Memorial Chair- 
man 



10. Irene Loeb, '18 
Chairman 
Edna Fischel 
Gellhorn, '00, 
National 
Chairman of 
Shaw Memorial 



11. Margaret Patter- 
son Campbell, 
'90, Chairman 



12. 



13. 



14. 



15.! 



16. Not organized as 
a district 



STATES OR DISTRICTS 



Illinois 

Minnesota 

Wisconsin 

Iowa 

Missouri 

Arkansas 

Kansas 

Oklahoma 

Texas 

Colorado 

Wyoming 
Arizona 
Utah 
Nebraska 
New Mexico 

Washington 
Oregon 



Northern Cal- 
ifornia 



Southern Cal- 
ifornia 

Idaho 
Nevada 
Montana 
North Dakota 
South Dakota 



STATE OR DISTRICT 
CHAIRMEN 



Grace Clarke / 

Wright \ 

Elizabeth f 

Hopkins j 

Johnson I 



Irene Loeb, '18 



Margaret Scrugg 
Caruth, '13 



Margaret P. 
Campbell 



Ethel Richard- 
son 



LOCAL DIVISIONS 



Chicago 



Minneapolis 
St. Paul 

Madison 
Milwaukee 



St. Louis 



Denver 



Seattle 



Portland 



San Francisco 



Los Angeles 



LOCAL CHAIRMEN 



Susan F. Hibbard 
Margaret A. 

Barnes 
Harriet Hough- 

teling 



Alice Miller 
Chest 



Irene Loeb, '18 



M. P. Campbell 
Carla Denison 
Swan 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[January 



ZONE 


STATES OR DISTRICTS 


STATE OR DISTRICT 
CHAIRMEN 


LOCAL DD7ISIONS 


LOCAL CHAIRMEN 


17 


England 
France 
China 
Japan 








18 








19 








20 

















One or more alumnae also live in the following foreign countries: Austria, Canada, Denmark, 
Ecuador, Germany, Greece, Honolulu, India, Mexico, Scotland, Spain, Switzerland, Syria, Turkey, 
Philippine Islands, Italy, South Africa and Cuba. 

NEW SCHOOL SUCCEEDS 



Emily James Putnam, '89, who is a lecturer 
at the New School for Social Research in which 
many alumnae are interested has written the 
following account of the success of the first 
term for The Quarterly: 

The new School for Social Research opened 
last October at 465 West 23rd Street, New York 
City, with a registration of 549 students. 
About three-fifths of these hold academic de- 
grees, and nearly the same proportion are en- 
gaged in some occupation besides studying. It 
seems clear therefore that the School supplies a 
demand not met by institutions already exist- 
ing, because of being not only "new" but in 
some respects novel. 

The aim of the school is to promote the use of 
intelligence, instead of violence, in dealing with 
social problems. It is not primarily a teaching 
institution; it is not primarily a staff of experts 
who undertake to direct research. It consists of 
a group of scholars who are themselves devoted 
to research and interested in relating the con- 
clusions of social science directly to the circum- 
stances of our time, and who wish to the best of 
their ability to help other inquirers. 

A Board of Directors have incorporated them- 
selves to take charge of the material interests of 
the School, but the policy and details of manage- 
ment, including the appointment and dismissal 
of members of the staff, are in the hands of the 
Faculty. The courses are given chiefly in the 
late afternoon and evening, when busy people 
can attend. No degrees are given; there are no 
formal examinations; there is no curriculum. 
The School welcomes anyone who can profit by 
its efforts, and the number of students admitted 
to research courses will be kept so small that 



each instructor will be able to satisfy himself as 
to the needs and abilities of those in his hands. 

The hope of its founders is that the School will 
become a focus for free, open, well-informed con- 
sideration of questions of the day which, exactly 
because of their vital interest for all of us, tend 
to fall into the realm of dogma instead of that 
of reason. 

The present staff of instructors are: Thomas 
S. Adams, Leon Ardzrooni, Harry E. Barnes, 
Charles Austin Beard, Robert Bruere, Charles 
B. Davenport, John Dewey, Frederick W. Ellis, 
A. A. Goldenweiser, Horace M. Kallen, Harold 
J. Laski, Carl McCombs, C. C. Maxey, H. C. 
Metcalf, Wesley Clair Mitchell, Moissaye Oldin, 
Elsie Clews Parsons, Roscoe Pound, Emily 
James Putnam, James Harvey Robinson, Ord- 
way Tead, Thorstein Veblen, Graham Wallas, 
Leo Wolman. 

Information may be obtained from Emma 
Peters Smith, Executive Secretary. 

Emily James Putnam. 

ANOTHER LOOK AT NEW YORK 

Mildred Minturn Scott (Mrs. Arthur H. 
Scott), '97, has returned from England to this 
country. Her impressions of New York are 
vividly portraited in a letter which was pub- 
lished in the London Nation for November 15. 
It reads: 

Sir, — I have been rediscovering my native 
city, a disconcerting experience. My first 
walk down Fifth Avenue left me bewildered and 
more than a little frightened. 

" Who were these hordes of richly clad women 
that passed me, their plump bodies balancing on 



1920] 



New School Succeeds 



high heels, their satin dresses gleaming on their 
haunches; or stood in groups gossipping and ap- 
parently unaware of the inconvenience they 
caused to others; or rolled by in an endless suc- 
cession of great, perfectly appointed motor cars, 
a more imposing display of wealth, by the way, 
than any to be seen in London or Paris? Their 
type was unfamiliar to me, the snatches of con- 
versation I caught as I passed almost unintelli- 
gible. They and the rare men accompanying 
them were low-browed, short-necked, high- 
shouldered, almost flat-faced. They were 
nearly all fat. The men were fat behind the 
ears. They talked a kind of Babu English. 
They exuded money. They made me feel more 
alien than I have ever felt in the Rue de la 
Paix, and Piccadilly rose up before me as it 
were the main street of my own native village. 

Further down, where the shops were less like 
royal palaces, I came on a yet more disturbing 
crowd. It was noon. The garment-workers, 
the employees from all the workshops that have 
mysteriously moved into this, which was in my 
childhood the very centre of the respectable dig- 
nified bourgeois life of the town (in fact. I was 
born and brought up there myself), these dirty, 
squalid, undersized men and women, strolled 
about, talking, spitting, and looking up with 
hostile black eyes at the motor-cars gliding by 
and the people in them. Was this New York? 
Were these people Americans? 

Jews, Lithuanians, Poles, Hungarians, Jews, 
Czecho-Slovaks, White Russians, Italians, 
Finns, Jews, Jews, Jews. What were they 
thinking? What planning? 

My relief when I turned into the charming 
house with the quiet, cloistered court and little 
fountain where the real American women meet 
and work out schemes for " social uplift" was 
quite comic. I felt that I had come home. 
Here was the familiar lanky New England type, 
with eye-glasses and smooth hair, and the more 
elegant but no less simple-minded New Yorker, 
and the competent waitress who knew everyone 
in the Club and respected herself as much as 
anyone; and here, also, the pleasantly natural 
nasal accent, so different from this new American 
dialect of the streets. 

"My dear," said one of the group of women 
with whom I was lunching, " this labor situation 
is really impossible. My painter tells me he 
can't take an order. The men are all on strike 
for $8 a day. They give $1.50 when they are 
at work to the Union, and then they don't mind 
taking a good long holiday at the rush season." 



"I can't get my windows cleaned," said 
another. "Those men are on strike too for 
the same wage." 

"Did you see the advertisement in the paper 
today?" asked a third. "To college professors, 
librarians, and teachers. Why do you stick on 
at your low-paid work? We offer you better 
wages for shorter hours. Apply to the Window 
Cleaners' Association." 

"My cook wants $65 a month, now, and I 
have to give it to her." 

"I have to pay my waitress $60." 

"And our 'wages' don't increase,'.' sighed the 
harassed wife of a professor. "I have somehow 
to manage for all five of us on $3,000 a year. 
But do you know the joke on us? The college 
has had to raise the salary of the competent 
engineer who runs our heating and electrical 
plant to $4,000 and a motor car, $1,000 more 
than we get!" 

"Speaking of jokes, I had an amusing expe- 
rience with a colored lady who was sent by the 
Employment Agency to clean my flat," said the 
hard-working secretary of a philanthropic so- 
ciety. "She asked $4.35 a day, and then 
added that she expected all her meals besides. 
'And you'll get someone else to do the high 
work, won't you, deary? I'm s' fleshy, I couldn't 
get up the ladder.' I told her I had no one else 
to get up, and as I hadn't time to do it myself, 
I was afraid she would not do. 'No, dearie,' 
she answered. 'We can't suit each other, 
seemingly. Good-bye. No offence taken or 
meant.' " 

When we had stopped laughing, the little 
lady who couldn't get her windows cleaned 
held up disconsolately a package she was 
carrying: — 

"It's getting beyond a joke," she lamented. 
"Here are twelve collars of my husband's that 
I just can't get washed. I go from place to 
place, but all the laundry-workers are on strike." 

"Did you hear what happened to Mrs. Mason, 
that most dignified of middle-aged dames?" 
queried the first speaker. "When she was re- 
turning from a fruitless visit to the employment 
agency, she met a woman who used to work for 
her: 'Oh, Mrs. Hennessey,' she cried, 'do you 
know anyone who can do my washing for me?' 
'Yes,' answered Mrs. Hennessey, 'I do. Go 
home and look in the glass.' " 

After this instructive meal I went forth to one 
of the great department stores in search of a 
hat, and was again plunged into the alien world. 
Never have I seen greater assurance, never been 



10 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[January 



more patronized, than by the small creature 
who deigned to tell me the prices of those I 
tried on, in a lingo that I could barely under- 
stand. I fancied a little velvet one, but con- 
fided to her my doubts of its suitability for an 
English winter. 

"Qh, that's all right, dear," she consoled me 
with a pitying smile. "You're thinking of them 
cheap valvuts that show the rain. Now this 
here is real sulk valvut, entahly relahble. 
Why, Ah have one exactly lahk ut musself, 
dear." But I despair of attempting to repro- 
duce her nasal-guttural corruption of our lan- 
guage. It was, I must in justice admit, no 
worse than Cockney. 

"Are you Englush, dear?" she inquired con- 
versationally, while we were waiting for the 
change. 

"Legally," I told her; "I was born American." 

"Were you, now?" she commented. "I 
should have thought you was Englush. You 
have that Englush accent. But it's queer how 
living in a country you pick up the dialect." 

An invincible thirst for information about this 
new world into which I had stepped now made me 
ask her what wages she was getting. 



"Seventeen dollars a week and commission,' , 
she said. "Brings it up to about twenty per. 
But Ah don't belong here. Ah'm on strike." 

"On strike?" I echoed, bewildered for the 
moment. 

"Yes, Ah'm a striking wholesale milliner," she 
said proudly. 

"And what are you striking for?" 

She gave me a glance of shrewd cunning and 
amusement. 

"Oh, the usual thing," she said, "more wages 
and less work." 

"And what wages were you getting?" I ven- 
tured. 

"Oh, between forty and fifty per week," was 
her negligent reply. "Here's your change, 
dear. 

Ten pounds a week, five hundred and twenty 
pounds a year, for a little girl of nineteen who 
trimmed hats for the wholesale trade, while the 
college professor only gets £600. And the chit 
was striking for what she called "a raise." — 
Yours, &c, 

Mildred Minturn Scott. 



IN MEMORIAM 



Dr. Carrie A. Harper, professor of English, 
Mount Holyoke College, and Ph.D. in English, 
Bryn Mawr in 1910, died on December 14 in 
the Franklin County hospital in Greenfield, 
Mass. She was ill a short time. 

Dr. Harper was born in Boston and educated 
at the Girls' Latin School in Boston and at 
Radcliffe. From 1899 to 1907 she was a teacher 
of English at the Gilman School, Cambridge, 



Mass. After receiving her Ph.D. degree from 
Bryn Mawr she became an instructor in English 
at Mount Holyoke. 

With Beulah Marie Dix Dr. Harper wrote 
The Beau's Comedy in 1902. She was also the 
author of many books on English literature and 
was a contributor to literary and technical jour- 
nals. She was a member of the Modern Lan- 
guage Association of America. 



NEWS FROM THE CAMPUS 



FIRST NORWEGIAN STUDENT 

Anna Gade is the first Norwegian student to 
enter Bryn Mawr. She is a member of the 
Freshman class. Before she landed in the 
United States, October 28, she had never heard 
of Bryn Mawr, but upon the recommendation of 
a relative who lives in Germantown, she sent in 
her credentials and was admitted. 

"Bryn Mawr is wonderful," Miss Gade said 
to a News reporter the first week she was on the 



campus, "and I have just written to some 
friends that American girls are much nicer than 
the ones in Norway. It is very common for 
the Norwegian girls to come to America to 
school. Before the war they went to Germany, 
but I do not know of one girl who has gone 
there this year." 

Miss Gade lived near Bergen and went to the 
Katedralskole, where she took the student ex- 
aminations that would admit her to the Uni- 
versity of Christiania. 



1920] 



News from the Campus 



11 



DAISY WRITES BRYN MAWR 

Daisy Ashford, author of The Young Visiters 
has written Haroldine Humphreys, '23, that she 
is not an invention of Barrie's and that she 
never met him until she called to thank him for 
writing the preface to her book. Miss Ashford's 
letter reads: 

"Thank you so much for your nice letter of 
appreciation about my book. I am so glad you 
really like it and especially to hear that you do 
believe in my genuineness. So many people 
over here, even now, still think that Barrie 
wrote it, and though it is a very great compli- 
ment I am beginning to get a little bit tired of 
hearing this. But evidently you were a highly 
imaginative and observant child yourself, so 
you were able to spot that " The Young Visiters" 
is a genuine thing. The original Ms. was not 
altered by a comma even, and is word for word 
as I wrote it. I am not an invention of Barrie's, 
in fact I never met him at all till after my book 
was published when I went to thank him for 
his kindness in doing the preface. I hope you 
will be able to convince your sceptical friends 
that I do exist and that I really wrote every 
word of The Young Visiters myself, without 
help from any one, and that the original Ms. 
was never altered or touched in any way. 
Yours sincerely, 

Daisy Ashford." 

FRESHMEN INTERVIEW ROYALTY 

Passing as reporters for a school paper two 
enterprising Freshmen interviewed the King and 
Queen of the Belgians in Broad Street Station 
last night (October 27). 

The two students, who took the 5.08 into 
Philadelphia in hopes of seeing King Albert, 
found that their train had been drawn up next 
to the royal train. In order to remain inside 
the train shed, which was closely guarded, they 
declared themselves reporters for a school paper. 
The detective attached to the royal party, whom 
they mistook for a reporter, arranged for the 
astonished students an interview with their 
Majesties. 

When asked about her visit to Bryn Mawr, 
the Queen said: "Bryn Mawr is lovely. It is 
just what is needed to train girls for work today. 
The place and spirit are wonderful. I had a 
delightful time there." 

King Albert commented upon Hog Island and 
expressed regret at not having been able to go 
to Bryn Mawr. 



As the train drew out of the station the Queen 
waved to the two "reporters" and motioned to 
the King to do likewise — The College News. 

Dr. Eduard Prokosch has been appointed lec- 
turer in German and Anglo-Saxon for the year 
1919-20 to fill the vacancy left by Dr. Jessen's 
death. Dr. Prokosch was born in Bohemia and 
came to America in 1901. He took an A.M. 
degree at the University of Chicago, a Ph.D. at 
Leipsic and has taught in the Universities of 
Chicago, Wisconsin and Texas. 

Delegates from the first international congress 
of working women spent the week-end of No- 
vember 8-9 at Bryn Mawr. Seven nationalities 
were represented. A mass meeting was held on 
Saturday evening in the Gymnasium at which 
President Taft presided. 

Mile. Jeanne Bouvier of France, spoke on 
"Employment Bureaus and Social Insurance in 
France;" M. Sophie Dobranka, of Poland, on 
the eight-hour day as it applies to industry and 
agriculture in Poland; Victorie Cappe, of Bel- 
gium, on "People's Houses in Belgium;" M. 
Marie Mayerova, of Czecho-Slovakia, on 
"Women in Politics," and Miss Kathleen Derry, 
of Canada, on "Minimum Wages in Canada." 

Mrs. George Bass, Democrat, and Miss Mary 
Stewart, Republican presented the appeals of the 
two great parties for women's support at a rally 
held in Taylor Hall on November 7. 

Hilda P. Hudson, British Scholar in 1910-11, 
has been created an officer of the British Empire 
for work done for the Air Board during the war. 
Miss Hudson was head of a department for 
stressing aeroplanes. 

Mary E. Saunders, British Scholar, 1917-18, 
is working in the office of the chief of staff, 
Military Intelligence Department, Washington, 
D. C. 

Dr. George H. Derry, lecturer in economics 
at Bryn Mawr, acted as toastmaster at a dinner 
which forty Kansas University graduates from 
Pennsylvania, Delaware and New Jersey 
gave on December 9 at the Hotel Vendig, 
Philadelphia. 

The Intercollegiate Community Service asso- 
ciation held its first annual conference at Bryn 
Mawr over the week-end of November 15-16. 
President Taft presided at an open meeting 
on "Community Development" on Saturday 
evening. 



12 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[January 



NEWS FROM THE CLUBS 



BALTIMORE 

The Baltimore club holds monthly meetings 
at the homes of its various members. The of- 
ficers are: President, Olga Kelly, '13; treasurer, 
Laura Fowler, '01; and secretary, Mallory 
Webster, '15. 

BOSTON 

Corresponding Secretary, Miss Anna D. Fry, 
The Ludlow, Boston, Mass. 

The Bryn Mawr club of Boston gave a lunch- 
eon on December 6 at the Hotel Brunswick at 
which Acting President Taft was the guest of 
honor. 

The club is planning interesting programs for 
its monthly teas. Felix Frankfurter of Harvard 
spoke at the December meeting. 

CHICAGO 

The Bryn Mawr Club of Chicago has taken a 
new lease on life and demonstrated an amount 
of enthusiasm and friendliness at a meeting at 
the Casino recently called by the Chicago En- 
dowment Committee, which was surprising to 
all. 

Preceding the meeting the members of the 
committee had given luncheons to the members 
of the club and had brought their guests to 
the meeting; it was a case of "a bird in the 
hand." 

The meeting was further enlivened by the 
scintillating remarks made by Nathalie Fair- 
bank Bell '05 (Mrs. Laird Bell), Ruth Furness 
Porter, '96 (Mrs. James Foster Porter) , and Har- 
riot Houghteling, ex-'07, who were the Chicago 
delegates to Bryn Mawr, and who came back 
with impelling pleas for a large Chicago fund. 

Margaret Ayer Barnes, '07 (Mrs. Cecil 
Barnes,) added some poignant data as to the 
financial vulnerability of this part of the coun- 
try, while Susan Foltansbee Hibbard, '97 (Mrs. 
William G. Hibbard), chairman of the Chicago 
Endowment Fund committee, not only gave an 
eloquent explanation of the endowment cam- 
paign but also had achieved the presence of Pro- 
fessor Paul Shorey whose classic persuasion was 
such that those present were enthused to help 
all they could. 

Harriot Houghteling has undertaken the sec- 
retaryship of the club since marriage took Jean- 
nette Ridlon to Switzerland. Miss Houghtel- 



ing is also collecting bonds for the fund if anyone 
wishes to send some. She has had some cause 
to be optimistic, but we are not publishing 
returns yet. 

NORTHERN CALIFORNIA 

The Bryn Mawr Club of Northern California 
was organized November 24 in San Francisco at 
the home of Amy Sussman Steinhart (Mrs. 
Jesse H. Steinhart) '02. Among those who 
helped form the club are: Cornelia Campbell 
Yeazell (Mrs. Harry A. Yeazell) '02, Lucy 
Chase Putnam (Mrs. Osgood Putnam) ex-'92, 
Amy Sussman Steinhart (Mrs. Jesse H. Stein- 
hart) '02, Erma Brandenstein Arnstein, ex-'09, 
Mary Burns Bransby (Mrs. Carlos Bransby) 
'03, Helen A. Lautz, '12, Ruth Babcock Deems 
(Mrs. Charles P. Deems) '10, and Jessie L. 
Preble, ex-'17. 

It was voted to admit to membership all 
whose names appear in the Alumnae Register; 
to hold annual meetings and others at the call 
of the president; to have $1.00 a year dues. 
The officers elected are: President, Harriet 
Bradford, '15; Secretary-Treasurer, Eleanor 
Allen, '14; Publicity Chairman, Erma Branden- 
stein Arnstein, ex-'09. 

NEW YORK 

Former Ambassador James W. Gerard was the 
chief speaker at an Armistice Day luncheon 
given at the Bryn Mawr Club in New York. 
Dagmar Perkins, chairman of the New York 
committee for the class of 1915 told of the plans 
for raising money for the Endowment Fund by 
the concert and ball which was given at the 
Plaza Hotel on December 5. 

PITTSBURGH 

The Bryn Mawr Club of Pittsburgh has begun 
the year 1919-1920 with an unusual amount of 
enthusiasm. The monthly teas have been well 
attended, 10 to 12 being present at each meet- 
ing, as compared with 6 to 8 last year. Several 
Bryn Mawr women who are in the city tem- 
porarily have been brought into the fold, so the 
membership is growing. The scholarship, of- 
fered each year to the applicant from Allegheny 
County making the highest average in the en- 
trance examinations, is held this year by Miss 



1920] 



News from the Classes 



13 



Ruth Beardsley of the Freshman class. The 
club is at present preparing for its annual poster 
campaign to advertise the scholarship among the 
High Schools and Girls' Preparatory Schools of 
the county. A French orphan, Marie Delisle, is 
still supported by the club, and her Christmas 
box was started last week. A little ward from 
the Juvenile Court, Agnes Carzinski, also claims 
a large share of the interest of the members. 
It is probable that this year the club will resume 
its pre-war practice and hold a Christmas lunch- 
eon in honor of the undergraduates who are at 
home for the holidays. 

ST. LOUIS CLUB 

Secretary, Anna R. Dubach, '19, 5507 Wat- 
erman Avenue, St. Louis, Mo. 

A Christmas play "The Little Girl and 
Amanda Arabella Jane" was given by little 
girls between eight and twelve and coached by 
Irene Loeb, '19, and Margaret Maxwell on De- 
cember 17. The children have become inter- 
ested in Bryn Mawr and enthusiastically look- 
ing forward to entering. The committee on 
arrangements was composed of Frances Allison, 
'19; Anna Dubach, '19, and Janet Holmes, '19. 



Three new members have been enrolled in the 
St. Louis club, having recently come to live in 
the city. They are Helen Tredway Graham, 
'11; Johanna Ross Chiam, '16, and Margaret 
Head Buchen (graduate). This brings the mem- 
bership up to 28. 

TEXAS 

President, Margaret Scruggs Caruth, ex-' 13 
Mrs. Raymond P. Caruth) 3700 Gilbert 
Avenue, Dallas, Texas. 

The Bryn Mawr Club of Texas is a purely 
social gathering of the thirty-three alumnae who 
reside in Texas. Its object is to keep in closer 
touch with the college, inspire Texas girls to go 
to college and to keep in closer touch with each 
other. There are no dues collected as the meet- 
ings are expected to be merely "get together" 
ones. We are absurdly young, having had only 
one previous meeting in April, 1918, but we 
hope to thrive lustily now. 

Invitations have been sent to the members- 
to gather December 10 at 4 o'clock with Mar- 
garet Scruggs Caruth, 3700 Gilbert Avenue to 
discuss, over a cup of tea, the weighty matter 
of the Two Million Dollar Endowment Fund and 
other interesting subjects. 



NEWS FROM THE CLASSES 



1889 

Class editor, Mrs. Frank H. Simpson, Overlook, 
College Hill, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Mabel Hutchinson Douglas (Mrs. J. Henry 
Douglas), died on July 6, the first loss by death 
that the first class to be graduated from Bryn 
Mawr has suffered. For many years she taught 
Greek in Newberg, Oregon. At the time of her 
death, she was professor of German in Whittier 
College, Whittier, Cal. 

Emily Balch is established in Geneva as 
secretary and treasurer of the Woman's Inter- 
national League for Peace and Freedom of 
which Jane Addams is president. 

1890 

Margaret Patterson Campbell (Mrs. Richard 
C. Campbell) is organizing Colorado, Kansas, 
Nebraska, Arizona and Utah for the Endow- 
ment Campaign. 

1893 

Class editor, S. Frances Van Kirk, 1333 Pine 
Street, Philadelphia, Penna. 



As part of the gift of '93 for 1918 came in 
after the books were closed for that year, a 
complete report is given here. 

The Twenty-fifth Anniversary Gift for '93 
for the year 1918, given in memory of Ruth 
Emerson Fletcher; Susan Walker FitzGerald, 
collector: — 
For Endowment Fund (See printed 

report) $761 .26 

Received after December 15, 1918. $215 .00 
For Service Corps Fund $110.00 

Total $1086.26 

Susan Walker FitzGerald is chairman of the 
committee in the Boston district for the Anna 
Howard Shaw Memorial Chair of Politics. 
Ann FitzGerald, her daughter, wrote the words 
of the class song for 1923. 

Gertrude Taylor Slaughter returned to her 
home in Madison, Wisconsin, in September. 
During the last year three articles of hers were 
published in The North American Review: 
"Venice at War," "The Answer from Italy," and 



14 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[January 



"The Significance of Fiume." Another article, 
"Italian Sentiment," appeared in The Atlantic 
Monthly. She has been asked to write three 
papers for the new edition of Warner's Library 
of the World's Best Literature: "The Poetry of 
George Meredith," "The Poetry of Thomas 
Hardy," and " Giovanni Pascoli." 

Amy Rock Ransome is helping with the im- 
portant Extension Work of Maryland Agricul- 
tural College. Last summer she put up 165 
quarts of vegetables raised by herself and her 
family in their own garden in Washington, 
canned or made into jellies and jams, 35 quarts 
of fruit, and salted 5 gallons of beans. A 
daughter of hers is in training at Columbia 
Hospital for Women. 

Grace Parrish Emerson's daughter, Ethel, is 
a student at RadclifTe. Another daughter is at 
Cambridge University. 

Louise Brownell Saunders's daughter, Sylvia, 
who expected to be a Freshman in Bryn Mawr 
this year, by a sudden change of plan went to 
the Lycee Victor Duruy in Paris. 

Elizabeth Nichols Moores's daughter Emily 
is in France, doing reconstruction work. 

S. Frances Van Kirk has a Latin Class in the 
Agnes Irwin School, Philadelphia. 

1895 

Class editor, Miss Mary F. Ellis, 2505 South 
Lambert Street, Philadelphia, Penna. 

Mary Flexner went to Bryn Mawr in October 
to work in connection with the booklet on Bryn 
Mawr which has been issued by the Endowment 
Fund Committee. Miss Flexner gathered from 
the records of the college many of the facts upon 
which the booklet is based. 

1897 

Class editor, Miss Mary M. Campbell, Walker 
Road, West Orange, N. J . . 

Bertha Rembaugh was defeated at the polls 
on November 4 as candidate for justice of the 
municipal court from the first district in New 
York City. Miss Rembaugh was running in a 
Tammany stronghold. The two men on the 
Republican ticket for this district were also 
defeated. The returns follow: Caffey (D) 
10,988, Moore (D) 11,232, Hoyer (D) 10,988, 
Turley (R) 8730, Rembaugh (R) 8231, Murray 
(R) 8324. 

1900 

Class editor, Miss Mary Helen MacCoy, 
Social Service, Base Hospital, Camp Devens, 

Mass. 



Edna Fischel Gellhorn (Mrs. George Gell- 
horn), president of the League of Women Voters 
of Missouri spoke on Armistice Day at the 
Washington University School of Medicine on 
"Women's Place in the Changing Order." 

1903 

Class editor, Mrs. H. K. Smith, Farmington, 
Conn. 

Dr. Marianna Taylor has resumed her prac- 
tice in St. Davids after two years service in 
France in civilian hospitals for women and 
children. 

1904 

Class editor, Miss Emma O. Thompson, 506 
South 48th Street, Philadelphia. 

Dr. Mary James has returned to her work at 
the Hospital at Wuchang, China. She spent 
the summer in the mountains recovering from 
an illness. 

Esther Sinn Neuendorffer (Mrs. Rudolph C. 
Neuendorffer) has a daugher Ruth, born Octo- 
ber 29. 

Maria Albee Uhl (Mrs. Edward Uhl) has a 
daughter Barbara, born October 12. 

1905 

Class editor, Mrs. Ellsworth Huntington, 650 
Canton Avenue, Milton, Mass. 

Alberta Hinkle Warner Aiken (Mrs. H. R. 
Aiken) has a son, born September 7. 

Olive Eddy Carpenter (Mrs. Clinton A. Car- 
penter) has a son, Albert Schofield Carpenter, 
born July 21. 

Margaret Thurston Holt (Mrs. Roscoe Holt) 
has a son born last summer. 

1906 

Class editor, Mrs. Edward W. Sturdevant, 
1627 Sixteenth Street, Washington, D. C. 

Esther White was married to Mr. Theodore 
Rigg on Wednesday, October 8. Mr. Rigg is 
from New Zealand, and they will make their 
future home there. 

Virginia Robinson is teaching at the Phila- 
delphia School for Social Research. 

Josephine Bright, ex-'06, is head of the bureau 
for medical social service at the Hahnemann 
Hospital in Philadelphia. She is living at the 
College Club. 

Katharine Gano, ex-'06, is a probation officer 
in Cincinnati. 

Jessie Thomas Bennett (Mrs. Z. Piatt 
Bennett) has quite recovered from her serious 



1920] 



News from the Classes 



15 



illness of last winter. She has bought a farm 
near Wilkes Barre. 

Beth Harrington Brooks (Mrs. Arthur H. 
Brooks) and her four children spent September 
with her mother in Ipswich before settling in her 
house in Cambridge. 

Louise Cruice Sturdevant with her husband 
and small daughter returned to America in the 
spring. She now has an apartment in Wash- 
ington where all 1906 are welcome. 

Louise Fleishman was married last spring to 
Mr. Alfred Maclay of New York. 

1907 

Class editor, Mrs. R. E. Apthorp, 8 Carpenter 
Street, Salem, Mass. 

Margaret Augur spent the summer in Chicago 
and is now back at Rosemary, Greenwich, 
Conn., for the winter. 

Adele Brandeis is chairman of the legislative 
committee of the Kentucky Consumers' League. 
She is studying art in New York City this winter 
and living with her uncle, Mr. Walter Taussig, 
Park Avenue, Yonkers. 

Margaret Morison worked in the Widener 
Library at Cambridge for about six weeks this 
summer and is teaching in New York City this 
winter. 

Katherine Harley writes the following account 
of her war work: 

"I went to the School of Occupational 
Therapy in Philadelphia all the autumn and 
winter of 1918 preparing to go into a hospital 
as a reconstruction aide. I was sick with 
influenza when my first orders came through 
in February, so they were recalled. I signed up 
again as soon as I was able and I was sent to 
the Base Hospital at Camp Upton. Camp 
Upton has been changed from a base to a post 
hospital and the reconstruction work was re- 
moved, so I was transferred here to General 
Hospital no. 38, Eastview, N. Y. Now this is 
closing and I leave for the Walter Reed in 
Washington soon. 

"Although I prepared for the craft work in 
accordance with the advice from the Surgeon 
General's office I have been doing academic 
work. The work is Americanization — teaching 
English to foreigners and I am finding it very 
interesting." 

Antoinette Cannon, who is in charge of the 
social service work at the University Hospital, 
Philadelphia, is supervisor of the practice period 
of the students in medical social work of the 
Smith College Training School for Social Work. 



Esther Williams Apthorp (Mrs. R. E. 
Apthorp) has a son, Robert Earl Apthorp, Jr., 
born October 16. 

Elizabeth Pope (Mrs. Edward Behr) has a 
son, Frederick, born in August. 

Rose Young died at Colorado Springs last 
May. 

1908 

Class editor, Mrs. William H. Best, 1198 
Bushwick Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Anna Walton was married on November 15 
to Mr. Francis W. Pennell, at Friends Meeting 
house in Philadelphia. 

Margaret Duncan was married last August to 
Mr. George F. Miller and is now living in 
Buckhannon, W. Va. 

Elizabeth Porter, is instructor in Spanish 
at Smith College and is also taking her final 
work in Spanish and French for a Ph.D. from 
Smith. 

Eleanor Rambo is an instructor in Greek at 
Smith. 

Anna Garret Walton was married on Novem- 
ber 15 to Francis W Pennell. 

Miriam Ristine has returned from France 
where she was doing canteen work for the 
Y. W. C. A., and is working in the U. S. Em- 
ployment Service, Philadelphia. 

"Good Friday, A Passion Play of Now," a 
new play by Tracy Mygatt was reviewed in the 
New Republic for December 5. John Haynes 
Holmes wrote the introduction of the play. 

Martha Plaisted Sax (Mrs. E. Sax), has a 
second son, Alexander, born August 16. 

1909 

Class editor, Mrs. Anson Cameron, 125 East 
Elm Street, Chicago, 111. 

Sarah Goldsmith Aronson (Mrs. Joseph 
Aronson) is living in Greenville, S. C, where 
her husband is pathologist to the City Hospital. 
Dr. Aronson was recently honorably discharged 
from the Medical Corps of the A. E. F. with the 
rank of major. 

Mary Holliday was married on August 1 to 
Dr. Harold H. Mitchell. They are living in 
New York where Mrs. Mitchell is taking a course 
at the School of Social Service. 

Frances Ferris is principal of the Friends' 
School in Haverford. 

Pleasance Baker was married on September 
30 to Arthur B. Parsons, Harvard, '09. Mary 
Norton Allen was a bridesmaid. Mr. and Mrs. 
Parsons have sailed for France to work with the 
Friends' Reconstruction Unit. 



16 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[January 



Aristine Munn Recht (Mrs. Charles Recht) 
is chief of the medical clinic at the Volunteer 
Hospital, New York City. 

Margaret Bontecou was married on December 
6 to Mr. Edward R. Squibb of Bernardsville, 
N. J., in Orange. They will live at Lake Mo- 
honk, N. Y., where they will open a school for 
boys in January. 

Spalding Brothers have published, recently, 
a book on Tennis for Women by Florence Ballin. 

1910 

Class editor, Mrs. H. B. Van Dyne, Troy, 
Penna. 

Elsa Denison Voorhees (Mrs. Dayton Voor- 
hees) has a daughter, Katrina Voorhees, born 
November 25. 

Mary Agnes Irvine returned from France in 
August and is teaching at Miss Spence's school 
in New York. 

1911 

Class editor, Miss Margaret J. Hobart, The 
Churchman, 381 Fourth Avenue, New York 
City. 

Helen Marguerite Ramsey was married on 
December 8 to William Lavelle Nasmyth at 
Rosemont, Penna. 

Margaret Hobart has been elected a member 
of the newly formed National Council of Women 
of the Episcopal church. 

Kate Chambers Seelye (Mrs. Laurens 
Seelye) with her two little daughters and her 
husband have arrived in Beirut, Syria, where 
her address will be Syrian Protestant College, 
Beirut, Syria. The party reached Beirut on 
September 23 after a none too easy trip. In 
Alexandria harbor they visited the refugee 
camp where Mrs. Seelye found that her 4 'Turkish 
was not as rusty as she had feared." Until their 
house in Beirut was ready for them, they visited 
in the hills of the Lebanon where Mrs. Seelye 
got a good rest and the children regained the 
roses in their cheeks. Margaret Doolittle left 
Beirut for Tripoli just before the Seelyes ar- 
rived there. Mrs. Seelye said that the mis- 
sionaries in Beirut found Miss Doolittle's classi- 
cal Arabic so perfect that their only fear was 
she would never learn any colloquial Arabic ! 

Ann Hathaway Greeley, the daughter of 
Dorothy Coffin Greeley (Mrs. Samuel Greeley), 
died very suddenly on Thanksgiving Day, after 
an illness lasting only twenty-four hours, in a 
Chicago hospital. Mrs. Greeley's third child, 
a boy, was born last September. Ann Hathaway 
was her eldest. 



Agnes Murray is associate director of field 
work in the Bureau of Civilian Relief at the 
national headquarters of the Red Cross at Wash- 
ington, D. C. 

1912 

Class editor, Mrs. John A. MacDonald, 3227 
North Pennsylvania Street, Indianapolis, Ind. 

Margaret Peck MacEwan (Mrs. Thomas 
S. .MacEwan), is living at 5639 Drexel Avenue, 
Chicago. 

The marriage of Gladys Chamberlain and 
Phillip Greeley Clapp will take place on Decem- 
ber 26. Mr. Clapp is professor of music and 
director of the department of music in the Iowa 
State University. They will be at home at 
334 South Summit Street, Iowa City, Iowa. 

Zelda Branch Cramer (Mrs. William Cramer) , 
served as assistant Federal Director of the 
United States Employment Service for the state 
of Missouri during the war and has now opened 
the Woman's Vocational Bureau in Kansas 
City with ofiices in the Arcade Building. 

Irma Shloss Mannheimer, ex-' 12 (Mrs. Eugene 
Mannheimer) has a son, Robert, born in March, 
1919. 

Dorothy Wolff Douglas (Mrs. Paul H. 
Douglas), has a daughter, Helen Schaeffer, born 
October 18. 

Gertrude Llewellyn is spending the winter in 
New York studying at the Cornell Medical 
College. 

Lorle Stecher has an appointment as psychol- 
ogist in the Children's Court, New York City. 

Pauline Clark worked on publicity for the 
Endowment Fund at Bryn Mawr throughout 
October. In November she was an operator in 
a shirt factory in Philadelphia, working from 
8 till 5.30 daily. 

Alice Stratton, ex-' 12, is instructor in nursing 
at St. Luke's Hospital, New Bedford, Mass. 

1913 

Class editor, Nathalie Swift, 156 East 79th 
Street, New York City. 

Elizabeth Shipley, ex-'13, was instrumental 
this autumn in getting from Mrs. Jacqueline 
Harrison Smith a fund to put an Italian girl 
through high school. Miss Shipley is working 
for the White-Williams Foundation for Edu- 
cational Social Service. 

Alice Hearne Rockwell (Mrs. Julius Rockwell), 
'13, has a second son, William Hearne Rockwell, 
born October 28. 

Louisa Haydock Hackett (Mrs. William 
Hackett), has a son, born October 18. 



1920] 



News from the Classes 



17 



Katherine Page Loring (Mrs. Charles G. 
Loring),has a second daughter, born October 27. 

Adelaide Simpson is fellow in Classical Phi- 
lology at Columbia. 

Gertrude Ziesing Stout (Mrs . Henry Stout) 
ex-' 13, has a daughter, Penelope Houghton 
Stout, born September 3. 

Joy Tomlinson Carter (Mrs. John H. Carter), 
ex-13, has a daughter, Joan Bland Carter, born 
October 27. 

Louise Matlack, ex-' 13, was married last sum- 
mer to Mr. Joshua Miner of New York. 

Mary W. Brown is laboratory assistant at 
Michael Reese Hospital, Chicago. 

Margaret Scruggs Caruth, ex-' 13 (Mrs. Ray- 
mond Caruth), is president of the Texas Bryn 
Mawr Club and is organizing the 33 alumnae 
scattered throughout the state for the Endow- 
ment Fund campaign. 

1914 

Class editor, Miss Ida Pritchett, School of 
Hygiene and Public Health, Johns Hopkins 
University, Baltimore, Md. 

Alice Miller Chester (Mrs. William Merrill 
Chester), has a daughter, Marion Merrill, born 
October 12. 

Lillien Cox Harman (Mrs. Archer Harman), 
has a daughter born October 21. 

Isabel Benedict is working in the Institute of 
International Education in New York this 
winter. 

Helen Kirk is assistant to Mile, le Gai, ficole 
de Danse, Philadelphia. Mile, le Gai arranged 
the pageants for the San Francisco Exposition. 

Mildred Baird is head of the English depart- 
ment at Miss Sayward's School in Overbrook. 

Catherine Creighton who received her M.D. 
from Johns Hopkins University last June, is 
resident house officer at Johns Hopkins Hospital 
this winter. 

Ella Oppenheimer has left Peter Bent 
Brigham Hospital in Boston and is now a prac- 
ticing physician in Washington. 

Eugenia Jackson Comey (Mrs. Arthur 
Comey), has a son, Richard Jackson Comey, 
born November 15. 

1915 

Class editor, Katharine W. McCollin, 2213 
St. James Place, Philadelphia, Penna. 

Rachel Ash is teaching at the University of 
Virginia. 

Hazel Barnett was married on November 6 
at Bedford, Penna., to Mr. John Russell Black- 
burn. 



Margaret Bradway has returned from France 
and has resumed her teaching at the Lyman 
School, Ardmore, Penna. 

Laura Branson has been appointed a member 
of the Conference Committee of the Alumnae 
Association. 

Isabel Foster is working on publicity for the 
Faculty Two Million Dollar Endowment Fund 
Campaign. Her office is in Taylor Hall, and 
she is living at the College Inn with Laura 
Branson. 

Ruth Glenn Pennell (Mrs. Edred J. Pennell) 
is teaching English to a class of Italians at the 
Community Center, Bryn Mawr. 

Mary Monroe Harlan was married to Dr. 
Charles Bagley, Jr., on Wednesday, December 
10, at Bel Air, Md. 

Adrienne Kenyon Franklin (Mrs. Benjamin 
Franklin, Jr.), is assistant manager of the 
Bureau of Occupation for Trained Women in 
Philadelphia. 

Dagmar Perkins managed a concert and ball 
which took place on December 5 at the Plaza 
in New York. The proceeds, $8,000, will be 
contributed to the Two Million Dollar Faculty 
Endowment Fund. 

Cleora Sutch is head of the" history depart- 
ment of the Scarsdale High School, Scarsdale, 
N. Y. She is living in White Plains, N. Y. 

Eleanor Dougherty played in "Hamlet" in 
Philadelphia last October. Her brother, Walter 
Hampden, played the part of Hamlet. 

Marjorie Meeker is married to Mr. Addison 
B. Gatling of New York City. 

Ruth Hubbard is secretary to Dean Smith of 
Bryn Mawr College. 

Katherine Snodgrass is working at the New 
School of Social Research, Columbia University 
for Ph.D. 

Helen Everett is instructor in the department 
of economics at Vassar. 

Isolde T. Zeckwer is an interne at Mercy 
Hospital, Pittsburgh. 

Ethel Robinson Hyde (Mrs. Louis Brossy 
Hyde) has a daughter, Elizabeth Louise Hyde, 
born November 13, at Norfolk, Va. 

Susan Brandeis is .working in the law office 
of Israel Thurman, New York, and expects to 
take her bar examinations in April. 

[1916 

Class editor, Mrs. Webb I. Vorys, 118 Miami 
Avenue, Columbus, Ohio. 

Mildred McKay was married recently to 
Lieutenant Commander Leslie Lafayette Jordan 
of the U. S. Navy. 



18 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[January 



Esther Kelly Seibels, (Mrs. Henry G. Seibels) 
has a daughter, Letitia, born last May. 

Dorothy Packard has announced her engage- 
ment to Mr. Farrington Holt of Detroit. 

Lucretia Garfield is teaching in a mountain 
school in Kentucky. 

Larie Klein has announced her engagement 
to Mr. Benjamin Boas of San Francisco. 

Chloe McKeefrey has announced her engage- 
ment to Lieut. Alex Usis, Coast Artillery, 
U. S. A. 

Pauline Wolf, ex-' 16, has a fellowship in the 
department of pathology in the Medical School 
of the University of Chicago. 

Elizabeth Stark is instructor in psychology 
at the University of Kansas. 

Helvetia Orr Perkins (Mrs. Frank Perkins) 
ex-' 16 has a daughter, Eleanor Orr, born 
August 16. 

Maki Hitotsuyanagi, ex-' 16, daughter of a 
viscount and former feudal daimyo of the Ono 
clan, Banshu, has been married recently in 
Tokyo to William M. Vories, an American 
architect. 

Elizabeth Tinker is assistant secretary at 
Miss Madeira's School in Washington. 

Mr. George Haskell, father of Margaret 
Haskell and founder of the Margaret Kingsland 
Haskell Chair of English Composition and of 
Margaret Kingsland Haskell scholarship in 
English Composition, died last September at 
his home in Evanston, 111. 

Elizabeth Washburn returned from France 
in November. 

Mathilde Loeb Samter (Mrs Stanley Sam- 
ter) has a daughter, Rosanne Samter, born in 
November. 

1917 

Class editor, Miss Constance Hall, 1755 N 
Street, Washington, D. C. 

A . Dorothy Shipley has returned from work- 
ing with the American Committee for Devas- 
tated France and is living at 316 West 79th 
Street, New York City this winter. 

Margery Scattergood will continue her work 
in France for the Friends' Reconstruction Unit 
until next summer. 

Lucy Harris has announced her engagement 
to Cecil Alexander Clarke of Indiana. 

Helen Zimmerman is teaching mathematics 
and science at Penn Hall, Chambersburg, Penna. 

Marion Tuttle is teaching in the High School 
at Metuchen, N. J. 



Florence Iddings Ryan (Mrs. David Ryan) 
has a daughter, Margaret Nancy Ryan, born 
November 15. Mr. and Mrs. Ryan are living 
in Miami, Fla. 

Hildegarde Kendig is living at the Front 
Street Settlement in Philadelphia and is doing 
social case work for the Red Cross. 

1918 

Class editor, Miss Margaret C. Timpson, 
Hotel Devon, 70 West 55th Street, New York 
City. 

Augusta Dure Howell, ex-' 18, (Mrs. Nathaniel 
Howell), has a daughter, Jean Barr Howell, 
born October 2. 

Lorraine Fraser is a secretary of the Webb 
Publishing Company, St. Paul, Minn. 

Elizabeth Houghton is taking courses at the 
University of Chicago. 

Helen Jones, upon her return from Europe is 
planning to take a four years course to become 
a member of the Actuarial Society of the United 
States. 

Virginia Kneeland is taking her second year 
at the College of Physicians and Surgeons, 
Columbia University. 

Irene Loeb is chairman of the endowment 
fund campaign for the state of Missouri. 

Ruth Garrigues is a student and assistant art 
teacher at the State Normal School, West 
Chester, Penna. 

Eugenie Lynch is teacher of science in the 
Springside School, Chestnut Hill, Pa. 

Margaret Mall is studying arthitecture at the 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 

Jessie Mebane is teacher of English at Row- 
land Hall, Salt Lake City. 

Sarah Morton is studying in Columbia Ex- 
tension Teaching, and is living at the Bryn 
Mawr Club of New York. 

Cora Neely is teacher of Latin and History 
at the Stevens School, Germantown. 

Leslie Richardson is Warden of Radnor Hall. 

Mary Rupert is planning to take a course in 
journalism at Columbia University, beginning 
in January. 

Mary Scott, ex-' 18, is studying for her A. B. 
degree at Barnard. 

Katharine Sharpless is working with the 
White- Williams Foundation in Philadelphia. 

Marion Smith is Fellow in Greek at Bryn 
Mawr for 1919-1920. 

Margery Smith, ex-' 18, was married on 
November 27, to William Ewart Van Dorn of 
Chicago. Mr. and Mrs. Van Dorn expect to 



1920] 



News from the Classes 



19 



live in Boston, as Mr. Van Dora is taking a 
special course at Harvard. 

Marjorie Strauss is studying medicine at the 
College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia 
University. 

Margaret Timpson is taking the course at the 
New York School of Social Work. 

Pen slope Turle is spending the winter in New 
York, studying at the Art Students League. 

Helen Walker is studying painting at the Art 
Institute of Chicago. 

Marjorie Williams was married last summer 
to Capt. John McCullough. They are living 
in Galveston, Texas. 

Ella Lindley Burton (Mrs. Ward Burton), has 
a daughter, Alice Whitney Burton, born Sep- 
tember 30. 

Mary Winsor, ex-' 18, was married on Sep- 
tember 15 to Henry Trumball, Jr., of Salem, 
Mass. 

Suzanne B. Packard Fine, ex-'18, died on 
November 29. 

1919 

Class editor, Mary E. Tyler, 165 Lake Avenue, 
Greenwich, Conn. 

Ethel Andrews, ex-' 19, is studying in Mr. 
George P. Baker's playwriting course at Har- 
vard, and working in stage design at the Boston 
Museum School. She also has a position as 
assistant in a course on Browning at the Sar- 
gent School in Cambridge. Address, 36 Bow- 
doin Street, Cambridge. 

Georgia Bailey, is studying at the Sorbonne 
in Paris. 

Fredrika Beatty is teaching English at the 
Lucy Cobb School, Athens, Ga. 

Elizabeth Biddle is acting as secretary of the 
Young Friends' Society of Philadelphia. 

Dorothea Chambers is studying Oriental 
History for an M. A. at Columbia University. 

Frances Clarke is working in a laboratory in 
a hospital in Providence. She is going to France 
in January to do Reconstruction work under 
the American Committee. 

Virginia Coombs is studying at Miss Conklin's 
Secretarial School at Scarsdale, N. Y. 

Frances Day is studying architecture at the 
Boston Technology. Temporary address, Stuart 
Club, 102 Fenway, Boston. 

Ruth Driver Rock, ex-' 19, (Mrs. Jack Rock) 
has a second daughter, born in October. 

Anna Rubenia Dubach is acting as secretary 
of the St. Louis committee of the Two Million 
Dollar Endowment Fund. 



Margaret Fiske, ex-' 19, is a senior at the 
School of Business of Columbia. 

Margaret France is taking Chemistry at 
Johns Hopkins preparatory to going to the 
School of Hygiene. 

Cornelia Hayman has announced her en- 
gagement to Mr. Loring Van Dam. 

Dorothea Hering is taking a secretarial course 
at Montclair, N. J. 

Janet Holmes is publicity agent for the Two 
Million Dollar Fund in St. Louis. 

Nanine Iddings, ex-' 19, is a senior in a 
Kindergarten course at Teacher's College, 
Columbia University. 

Helen Karns was married during the summer 
to Carrol D. Champlin, and is now living in 
Pittsburg. 

Winifred Kaufmann was married to Eugene 
C. Whitehead on August 28, in Evanston, 111. 

Marguerite Krantz is studying character 
dancing and pageantry in New York, and teach- 
ing it at Bryn Mawr once a week. 

Mabel Lafferty is studying English and Edu- 
cation at the University of Pennsylvania for an 
M.A. Address, 4925 North 13 Street, Phila- 
delphia. 

Adelaide Landon has charge of all the girls' 
work at Grace Church, N. Y. 

Elizabeth Lanier is athletic instructor at 
Rosemary Hall. She also is teaching folk 
dancing and games to children under the direc- 
tion of Mr. Robert Lawrence. 

Enid MacDonald is with the Employment 
Bureau of the Western Telegraph Company in 
New York City. 

Edith Macrum is working in the Research 
Bureau of the Aluminum Company of America, 
at their plant near New Kensington, Penna. 

Emily Moores has gone to Europe with a 
party of delegates to the International Parlia- 
mentary Union at Geneva. 

Marion Moseley is doing volunteer work in 
Chicago. She is teaching English to foreigners 
at a high school, and is working with a club of 
Girl's Reserves in the Y. W. C. A. 

Jeannette Peabody is working as a doctor's 
assistant in the Public Health Department of 
the Red Cross in Boston. 

Winifred Perkins Raven, ex-' 19, is living in 
Hanover, as her husband is an instructor in 
English at Dartmouth. 

Mildred Peacock, ex-' 19, has announced her 
engagement to Mr. William Herther of Chicago. 

Dorothy Peters' correct address is Station B, 
R. D. No. 1, Columbus, Ohio. 



20 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[January 



Lucretia Peters has announced her engage- 
ment to Lieutenant Gerald Wills Beagley, 
R.M. Her address is 26 East 58th Street, 
New York. 

Helen Prescott is working as district secretary 
in training with the Boston Associated Charities. 

Roberta Ray is teaching Latin and History 
at Miss Mills' school, Mt. Airy, Philadelphia. 

Helen Reid is studying at the Sorbonne in 
Paris. 

Anna Reilly was married November 16, 1918, 
to William G. Cuff. She is living in Bryn 
Mawr now. 

Rebecca Reinhardt is taking a business course 
in Wilmington, and teaching arithmetic at 
Miss Hebb's school. 

Marjorie Remington has announced her 
engagement to Pierpont Edwards Twitchell. 

Margaret Rhoads is at home working on 
committees connected with the American end 
of the Friends Mission in Japan. 

Edith Rondinella is taking courses in English 
and French in the Graduate School of the Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania. 

Alice Rubelman, ex-' 19, was married October 
18 at St. Louis to Ben Knight. 

Mrs. Marie Schwartz has been unable to use 
her French scholarship as she has had to move 
away from Philadelphia. Her new address is 
not yet known. 

Beatrice Sorchan is in the Publicity Depart- 
ment of the National Social Unit Organization 
in New York City. 

Catherine Taussig has gone to France to 
teach refugee children. Before she left she gave 
a $1000 inheritance to the Two Million Dollar 
Fund. 

Sarah Taylor was married on July 28 to Dr. 
James Vernon. 



Mary Lee Thurman is in France doing recon- 
struction work under the American committee 
for Devastated France. 

Mary Tyler is teaching in the Rosemary 
Preparatory School. She is also going to do 
some girl's work in Dr. Fosdick's Church in 
New York. 

Dorothea Walton was married last summer to 
Edmund Price. She is living in Bronxville, 
N. Y. 

Amelia Warner is studying Psychology in 
Western Reserve University. 

Louise Wood is secretary of the North Shore 
Country Day School in Chicago. 

Gordon Woodbury is selling in Doubleday 
Page's book store in Lord & Taylor's, New 
York City. She sails for France in January to 
do reconstruction work under the American 
Committee. 

The 1919 people studying for M.A.s at Bryn 
Mawr this year are: Ruth Woodruff (she is 
president of the Psychology Club and stage 
manager of the Graduates' play) ; Helen Spald- 
ing (she is also studying Parole and Probation 
work in Philadelphia); Margaret Gilman and 
Ernestine Mercer. 

Those back for a fifth year are: Helen 
Huntting, Katherine Tyler, Margaret Butler, 
Margaret Janeway, Eleanor Marquand, Martha 
Watriss, Mary Scott, Isabel Whittier, and 
Emily Matz. 

The whole class extends its sincerest sym- 
pathy to Anna Thorndike on account of the 
death of her mother; and to Marie Lubar on 
account of the death of her father. 

Elizabeth Hurlock is teaching mathematics 
and psychology at the Glen Eden school in 
Stamford, Conn. 



BRYN MAWR AUTHORS AND THEIR BOOKS 



Good Friday, A Passion-Play of Now. By 

Tracy D. Mygatt. Published by the Author, 

23 Bank Street, New York. 

An American officer, stationed during the war 

at one of our military prisons, on Alcatraz 

Island, is said to have experienced profound 

emotion from the sight of a bearded face of 

unearthly beauty which looked back at him 

through the grated windows. " Good God?" he 

is said to have exclaimed to a brother officer, 

"They've got Jesus Christ in there!" 



Tracy Mygatt, '08, has taken the spirit of 
this incident, amplified it with certain facts hu- 
miliating in the extreme to our humanity in 
America, and skillfully wrought it into what The 
Dial describes as "a little piece full of deep 
emotion and weird dramatic interest." For 
the last two years she has been playwriting, 
and those who enjoyed the realism of "The 
Noose," given at the Neighborhood Playhouse 
last spring, will recognize here something of the 
same quality. 



1920] 



Bryn Mawr Authors and Their Books 



21 



Good Friday, A Passion-Play of Now, nar- 
rates in blank verse the spiritual revolution 
worked in a dull-witted prison keeper by the 
Christ-like love which continually breaks 
through the bodily torment of an unsophisti- 
cated Russian "Slacker," or Conscientious Ob- 
jector. But three characters compose this close- 
knit one-act drama, — the dying objector, Ivan, 
the brutal prison doctor, and a keeper slowly 
obsessed with the conviction that "My name is 
Judas!" Yet testimony that it is a play, and a 
tense one, comes from two successful produc- 
tions to little theatre audiences in Boston and 
Chicago, as well as from its various reviewers. 
One of these thus comments upon a quality 
which I myself feel extremely characteristic: 
"A marked restraint is present, unusually 
praiseworthy in a play struck out in hot indig- 
nation at a present wrong, restraint in the quiet 
lines devoid both of denunciation and of over- 
sweetness, restraint in the humble personality 
of Ivan with his human loves and memories." 
It might interest Quarterly readers to know 
that another Bryn Mawrtyr, Margaret Hobart, 
'09, writing in The Churchman, concurs in this 
view, though she finds Good Friday too partisan. 
She says, "Miss Mygatt has handled her theme 
artistically and dramatically." 

To their unanimous concession of dramatic 
quality, however, several reviewers have added 
a damaging word about the verse. Nation and 
New Republic find it a bit stiff and inelastic, 
though the latter concedes greater beauty to 
some of Ivan's speeches. Stiffness is not the 
fault the present reviewer would see in them. 
For me, the number of broken lines lend an 
easy and convincingly natural quality to the 
dialogue. But I am no judge of technical 
verse-flaws. I do feel, however, that without 
losing anything in simplicity the phrasing might 
have been colored in places with more poetic 
poignancy. 

Good Friday will, I hope, in addition to the 
interest of its authorship, make a real appeal to 
Bryn Mawr readers to bestir themselves on 
behalf of those 150 C.O.'s still held in our prisons 
more than a year after the close of the war. 
Italy released hers soon after the armistice. 
England had freed hers by August 5, in respect 
to a public opinion stimulated by such peti- 
tioners as 18 members of the House of Bishops, 
Bernard Shaw, and John Galsworthy. France 
has granted several partial amnesties, and it is 
safe to assume that America has shown a much 
harsher spirit toward her dissenters than any 



other participant in the war, if indeed she is 
not the only country today still punishing the 
young men whom Israel Zangwill calls the 
"corner-stones of our future civilization." 

John Haynes Holmes, introducing the play 
says, Good Friday should do for conscientious 
objectors in this country what John Gals- 
worthy's Justice did for ordinary prisoners in 
England." 

Frances M. Witherspoon, '08. 

PRINCETON VISTAS 

Helen Davenport Gibbons, ex-'06, writes the 
following continuation of her Paris Vistas 
especially for the members of her class and other 
interested alumnae: 

Dear 1906: — The Gibbons family sailed from 
Havre on August 12, 1919. My husband made 
two flying trips to America during the war, but 
for me and the children it was our first sight of 
home since May, 1914. Baby Hope was born 
in 1915 so she saw her country for the first time. 
The older children could remember nothing of 
other visits here, so for the youngsters it was 
the discovery of America. When I gave Floyd 
a slice of watermelon in a New York hotel he 
said he didn't like it "because there is too much 
of it and it is too cold." 

We have kept our apartment and our studios 
in the Latin Quarter. Christine, aged ten, 
thinks that is a good idea because "if we don't 
like America or they don't like us, we can tell 
them our home is in Paris." 

We are settled for one year in Princeton, 
earning our living by writing. And the children 
like America. Princeton is a paradise for 
children. The only thing we don't like here is 
the sound of blasting in some quarry nearby — 
too much like an air-raid or Grosse Bertha. 

When we reached New York I found out 
Century Company had advertised my new book 
Paris Vistas as a Christmas publication. I 
thought I had more time, so instead of running 
around seeing friends and places I "disappeared" 
for two months and finished the book. It was 
published November 28. 

Since Paris Vistas was finished I have been 
a bit lazy and have done some visiting. Went 
to Bryn Mawr a couple of weeks ago and spent 
the night with Miss Taft. Alice Hawkins came 
over to Miss Taf t's house in the evening and we 
had a good talk. Other Bryn Mawr dignitaries, 
all recent graduates, came over too and we 
chatted till nearly midnight. Among others 



22 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[January 



was Miss Applebee. She was on the ship when 
Herbert and I sailed for Ireland the week after 
our marriage. She chaperoned our honeymoon. 

Next morning I spoke in chapel. Told the 
students about my Little Gray Home in France. 
Could not resist telling them also that I feel as 
young as they look! 

Herbert and I are busy as bees. He does a 
daily letter for the Philadelphia Press, a monthly 
article for the Century Magazine and is starting 
a new book. I have a Christmas story in the 
December Century. We are both to have 
lecture tours after Christmas. I shall look you 
all up in the Register and if I come to your town 
shall hope to see you. You will find me rather 
thin and with bobbed hair. The hair came off 



not because I thought it was artistic, but in 
order to gain time. I save forty minutes out 
of each busy day by not bothering with hair- 
pins! 

If any of you come to Princeton or are in my 
neighborhood, I have a guest-room and we have 
dinner every day. Our telephone number is 
Princeton 360. 

Faithfully yours, 
Helen Davenport Gibbons. 

Anna Branson Hillyard (Mrs. Brame Hill- 
yard) '03 has an article entitled "I Discover the- 
Old Testament" in the North American Review 
for January, 1920. Mrs. Hillyard is living at 
Lyndhurst, Cliff Parade, Leigh-on-Sea, England 



The Shipley School 

Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania 



Preparatory to Bryn Mawr College 



Alice G. Howland, 
Eleanor 0. Brownell, 

Principals. 

LAKEWOOD HALL 

LAKEWOOD, N. J. 

A College Preparatory School for 

Girls. Carefully planned 

General Courses 

Principal 

Lisa B, Converse, 

A.B. Bryn Mawr College 

THE MISSES KIRK'S 

College Preparatory School 

Bryn Mawr Ave. and Old Lancaster Road 

Bryn Mawr, Pa. 
Number of boarders limited. Com- 
bines advantages of school life with 
private instruction. Individual schedule 
arranged for each pupil. 

All teachers thoroughly familiar with 
college preparatory work. Frequent 
examinations by Bryn Mawr College 
professors. 
Gymnastics and outdoor games. 



The Baldwin School 



A Country School 
for Girls 



Bryn Mawr 
Pennsylvania 
Ten miles from Philadelphia. Fire- 
proof Stone Building. Outdoor Gym- 
nasium. Winter Basketball Field 
Outd$or and Indoor Classrooms 
Extensive Grounds. 
Preparation for Bryn Mawr, Mount Holyoke, 
Smith, Vassar and Wellesley colleges. Also 
a strong general course. Within 26 years 272 
students from this school have entered Bryn 
Mawr College. Abundant outdoor life — 
hockey, basketball, tennis, riding. 

Elizabeth Forrest Johnson, A.B., 
Head of the School 



MISS MADEIRA'S SCHOOL 
1330 19th St.. N. W. Washington, D. C. 

A Resident and Day School 
for Girls 

LUCY MADEIRA WING, A.B. 

MRS. DAVID LAFOREST WING 
Head Mistreat 



MISS BEARD'S SCHOOL 

Situated in one of the most healthful and 
beautiful of the New York suburbs, 
Orange, N. J. This school offers the 
advantages of country and city alike. 

College Preparatory, Special, and Grad- 
uate Courses. Gymnasium, Music 
and Art Studios. Domestic Arts. 

Write for Illustrated Catalogue 

Address 

Miss Lucie C. Beard Orange, N. J. 



The Ethel Walker School, Inc. 

SIMSBURY, CONNECTICUT 

Head of School 

ETHEL M. WALKER 

A.M. BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 



Kindly mention the Quarterly 

i 



St. Timothy's School for Girls 



CATONSVILLE. MD. 



Re-opened September, 1919 
Closet June. 1920 



Prepares for College, preferably 
Bryn Mawr 



MISS WRIGHTS SCHOOL 
FOR GIRLS 

Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Prepares for Bryn Mawr with certifi- 
cate privileges for other 
colleges 



Rosemary Hall 

Founded 1890 

No elective courses 

Prepares for college 

Preferably Bryn Mawr 

Caroline Ruutz-Rees, Ph.D.) ,, ,«-. 
Mary E. Lowndes. Litt.D. / Head M » trtwM 

GREENWICH. CONNECTICUT 



THE AGNES IRWIN SCHOOL 

201 1 DE LANCEY PLACE 
PHILADELPHIA 

Prepares for Bryn Mawr, Smith, 
Vassar and Welletley 
Colleges 



JOSEPHINE A. NATT. Head-MUtre« 
BERTHA M. LAWS. S«cretary-TreMur«r 



MISS COWLES* SCHOOL FOR GIRLS 

(Highland Hall) 
Emma Milton Cowles, A.B., Head of School 

Preparatory to Bryn Mawr, Welles- 
ley, Vassar, Smith and Mount Hol- 
yoke. Certificate privilege. Also 
strong general course. Music, Art, 
and Domestic Science. Healthful 
location, 1000 feet altitude. New 
sleeping porch. Gymnasium, swim- 
ming pool. Catalogue. 

Address the Secretary 
Pennsylvania - - Hollidaysburg 



Rogers Hall School EQr girls 



FACES ROGERS FORT HILL PARK 



38 MINUTES FROM BOSTON 



'"jPHOROUGH preparation for Bryn Mawr and other colleges. Rogers 
Hall is now represented in Bryn Mawr, Radcliffe, Smith, Vassar, 
Wellesley, University of Wisconsin, and University of Chicago. Large 
grounds for outdoor sports. Experienced instructors in charge of all 
athletics. New Gymnasium and Swimming Pool. For catalogue, address 

MISS OLIVE SEWALL PARSONS, Principal LOWELL, MASS. 



Kindly mention the Quarterly 

IX 




ret clock 
nd auto- 
cally by 
balf horse 
sr motor. 




Electric monorail crane, 
for hoisting coal 



I Motor-generator set mounted on crane 
I supplying, power for lifting magnet 



Magnetic sorting 
machine, oper- 
ated by a two- 
horsepower mo- 
tor, separates 
brass from iron. 



Electricity — 

the Master Force in Manufacturing 

T^HE marvels of electricity have revolutionized our 
JL manufacturing industries. With belts and pulleys 
replaced by electric motors operating automatic— almost 
human—machines, many a slow and tedious process has 
been eliminated. The factory worker's task of yesterday 
is made pleasant by his command of this magic power. 

The Crane Company's plant at Chicago-electrical throughout-is a 
model of industrial efficiency. Its 10,000 horse-power of driving 
energy ,s brought by three small wires from a distant power plant 
I hen electricity drives the machinery which handles the coal for heat-' 
mg, cuts the steel, sifts the sand and sorts the material— in fact does 
everything from scrubbing the floor to winding the clock. 

Such an institution is marvelous— superhuman— made thus by the 
man.multiplying force of electricity. The General Electric Company 
has been instrumental in effecting this evolution. First, by developing 
successful electrical generating and transmission apparatus to furnish 
economically this modern form of power. Secondly, through many 
years of active co-operation with hundreds of manufacturers, it has 
mastered the art of applying the use of electrical energy to a multitude 
of needs. And finally, through branch offices and other distributing 
channels, its products are made accessible to all. 




operated by motor 
d to lamp socket 
rubs floors. 



95-109C 




RYN MAWR 
ALUMNAE 



^'QUARTERLY 



Vol. XIV 



APRIL, 1920 



No. 2 



Report Of The Annual Meeting Of The 
Alumnae Association 

Endowment Round Table Held In 
Taylor Chapel 

Endowment Work In Full Swing Leaves 
Commencement Almost Forgotten 

Endowment Personnel 

May Day Will Be Undergraduates' 
Endowment Gift 



Published by the Alumnae Association 

of 
Bryn Mawr College 



THE BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE 
QUARTERLY 

Editor-in-Chief 
Isabel Foster, '15 
Bryn Mawr, Penn. 

TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Report of the Annual Meeting of the Alumnae Association ... 23 

The Minutes of the Annual Meeting 26 

Annual Report of Board of Directors 3o 

Report of the Academic Committee 32 

Report of Finance Committee 34 

Annual Report of Treasurer of Bryn Mawr Alumnae Association . . 46 

Report of James E. Rhoads Scholarship Committee 52 

Carola Woerishoffer Memorial Fund Report 53 

Report of Loan Fund Committee 53 

Report of Athletic Committee 53 

Report of A. C. A. Convention 54 

quarterley report 54 

Conference Committee Report • 55 

Reports from Bryn Mawr Clubs 55 

By-Laws 59 

Endowment Round Table Held In Taylor Chapel 62 

Endowment Work In Full Swing Leaves Commencement Almost 

Forgotten 64 

Endowment Personnel 67 

May Day Will Be Undergraduates' Endowment Gift 71 

News from the Campus 74 

In Memoriam 76 

Letters to the Editor 76 

News from the Classes 79 

Bryn Mawr Authors and Their Books 89 

Contributions to the Quarterly, books for review, and subscriptions should be sent to 
the Editor-in-Chief, Isabel Foster, Taylor Hall, Bryn Mawr, Penn. Cheques should be 
drawn payable to Bertha S. Ehlers, Taylor Hall, Bryn Mawr, Penn. The Quarterly 
is published in January, April, July and November of each year. The price of subscription 
is one dollar a year, and single copies are sold for twenty-five cents each. Any failure 
to receive numbers of the Quarterly should be reported promptly to the Editor. Changes 
of address should be reported to the Editor not later than the first day of each month 
of issue. News items may be sent to the Editors. 



Copyright, 1920, by the Alumnae Association of Bryn Mawr College 



THE BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE 
QUARTERLY 



VOLUME XIV 



APRIL, 1920 



No. 2 



REPORT OF THE ANNUAL MEETING OF THE 
ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION 



OFFICERS AND COMMITTEES 
Officers, 1920-22 

President, Louise Congdon Francis (Mrs. 
Richard S. Francis), '00, Haverford, Penna. 

Vice President, Leila Houghteling, '11, 
1306 Astor Street, Chicago, 111. 

Recording Secretary, Myra Elliot Vauclain 
(Mrs. Jacques Vauclain), '08, Buck Lane, Bryn 
Mawr, Penna. 

Corresponding Secretary, Katharine Mc- 
Collln, '15, 2213 St. James Place, Philadel- 
phia, Penna. 

Treasurer, Bertha Ehlers, '09, Taylor Hall, 
Bryn Mawr, Penna. 

PHILADELPHIA BRANCH OFFICERS 

Chairman, Elizabeth Bent Clark (Mrs. 
Herbert L. Clark), '95. 

Secretary-Treasurer, Virginia T. Stoddard, 
'03. 

Advisory Committee, Louise Watson, '12; 
Myra Elliot Vauclain (Mrs. Jacques L. 
Vauclain), '08. 

NEW YORK BRANCH OFFICERS 

Chairman and Treasurer, Frances Browne, 
'09. 
Secretary, Katharine G. Ecob, '09. 

WASHINGTON 

President, Margaret Free Stone, '15 (Mrs. 
J. Austin Stone), 2831 28th Street, N. W. 
Washington, D. C. 

Vice-President and Treasurer, Lisa B. Con- 
verse, '96. 

Secretary, Elsie L. Funkhouser, '11. 

OFFICERS OF BRYN MAWR CLUBS 

Baltimore 
President, Olga Kelly, '13, 1406 Eutaw 
Place, Baltimore, Md. 



Secretary, Mallory Webster, '15, 3023 Z_ 
Clifton Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

Treasurer, Laura Fowler, '01, 329 Dolphin 
Street, Baltimore, Md. 

Boston 

President, Katherine Williams Hodgdon, 
'13 (Mrs. Waldo C. Hodgdon), High St., West- 
wood, Mass. 

Vice President and Treasurer, Sylvia Scud- 
der Bowditch, '99 (Mrs. Ingersoll Bowditch), 
32 Woodland Road, Jamaica Plain, Mass. 

Recording Secretary, Evelyn Walker, '99, 
119 Park Street, Brookline, Mass. 

Corresponding Secretary, Anna D. Fry, '98, s 
The Ludlow, Copley Square, Boston. 

Chicago 
President, Alice Gerstenberg, '07, 539 
Deming Place, Chicago, 111. 

China 

President, Kathrina Holland Van Wag- 
enen Bugge, '04 (Mrs. Sten Bugge), care of 
Norwegian Mission, Yiyang, Hunan, China. 

Secretary, Jane S. Ward, '05, Y. W. C. A., 
Shanghai, China. 

New York City 

President, Alice Day Jackson, '02 (Mrs. 
Percy Jackson), 63 East 52nd Street, New 
York City. 

Vice President and Chairman of Entertain- 
ment Committee, Theresa Helburn, '08, 425 
West End Avenue, New York City. 

Treasurer, Dorothy Forster Miller, '07 
(Mrs. R. Bleeker Miller), 114 East 84th Street, 
New York City. 

Assistant Treasurer, Janet Grace, '17, 302 
West 25th Street, New York City. 

Secretary, Evelyn Holt Lowry, '09 (Mrs. 
Philip W. Lowry), 450 Riverside Drive, New 
York City. 



< 



t 



< 



23 



24 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[April 



> 



/ 



v 



Chairman of Admissions Committee, Helen 
F. Carey, '14, care of Martin Carey, 26 Broad- 
way, New York City. 

Chairman of House Committee, Louise 
Fleischmann Maclay, '06 (Mrs. Alfred B. 
Maclay), 32 East 64th Street, New York City. 

Ohio 

President, Grace L. Jones, '00, 1175 East 
Broad Street, Columbus, Ohio. 

Vice President, Elsie H. Bryant Good- 
wills, '08 (Mrs. D. H. Goodwillie), 631 
Acklin Avenue, Toledo, Ohio. 

Secretary and Treasurer, Adeline Werner 
Vorys, '16 (Mrs. Webb I. Vorys), 118 Miami 
Avenue, Columbus, Ohio. 

Pittsburgh 
President, Helen Schmidt, '04, 157 Dith- 
ridge Street, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Secretary, Henrietta F. Magoffin, '11, 
.^Westminster Place 2, 800 Aiken Avenue, Pitts- 
burgh, Pa. 

Treasurer, Minnie List Chalfant, '08 
(Mrs. Fredrick Bernard Chalfant), 739 Beatty 
Street, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Northern California 

President, Harriet Bradford, '15, Box 833 
Stanford University. 

Secretary-Treasurer, Eleanor Allen, '14, 
Bonita, Cal. 

Publicity Chairman, Erma Brandenstein 
Arnstein, '09 (Mrs. Hugo Arnstein), 3535 
Clay Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

St. Louis 

President, Irene Loeb, '18, 5154 West- 
minister Place, St. Louis, Mo. 

Vice President and Treasurer, Alice Rubel- 
man, ex-'19, 5 Forest Ridge, St. Louis, Mo. 

Secretary, Anna R. Dubach, '19, 5507 
Waterman Street, St. Louis, Mo. 

Washington 

President, Margaret Free Stone, '15 
(Mrs. James A. Stone), 2831 28th Street, Wash- 
ington. 

Vice President and Treasurer, Lisa B. Con- 
verse, '96, 1700 Q St., Washington. 

Secretary, Elsie Funkhouser, '11, 221 A-B 
Building, Government Hotels, Washington, 
D. C. 

COMMITTEES 

ACADEMIC COMMITTEE 

Janet Howell Clark, '10, Chairman 1919-1922 
Mary Breed, '92 1919-1921 



Eleanor Fleisher Riesman, '03. . . 1920-1921 

Elizabeth S. Sergeant, '03 1919-1923 

Helen Sandison, '06 1919-1923 

Eleanor L. Lord, Ph.D 1920-1924 

Abigail C. Demon, '96 1920-1921 

Louise Congdon Francis, '00 ex-officio 

conference committee 

Eleanor Fleisher Riesman, '03, 
Chairman, 1715 Spruce Street, 

Philadelphia, Pa Oct. 1919-Oct. 1920 

Mary Peirce, '12 1919-1920 

Laura Branson, '15 1919-1920 

Rebecca Reinhardt, '19 1919-1920 

Louise Congdon Francis, '00 ex-officio 

LOAN FUND COMMITTEE 

Martha G. Thomas, '89, Chairman, 
Pembroke Hall, Bryn Mawr 

College 1916-1921 

Doris Earle, '03 1917-1922 

Elizabeth Maguire, '13 1918-1923 

Alice Patterson Bensinger, '13 . . 1919-1924 

Katherine L. Howell, '06 1920-1925 

Louise Congdon Francis, '00 ex-officio 

Bertha S.. Ehlers, '09 ex-officio 

COMMITTEE ON ATHLETICS 

Mary G. Branson, '16, Chairman, 

Rosemont, Pa 1918-1921 

Alice M. Hawkins, '07 1918-1922 

Louise Marshall Mallery, '05 . . . 1919-1924 

Marion S. Kirk, '10 1919-1923 

Margaret H. Bacon, '18 1920-1925 

Louise Congdon Francis, '00 ex-officio 

JAMES E. RHOADS SCHOLARSHIP COMMITTEE 

Lucy M. Donnelly, '93, Chairman, 
Low Buildings, Bryn Mawr Col- 
lege 1919-1922 

Mary C. Smith, '14 1920-1921 

Anne Hampton Todd, '02 1920-1923 

Louise Congdon Francis, '00 ex-officio 

FINANCE COMMITTEE 

Martha G. Thomas, '89, Chairman, Pembroke 

Hall, Bryn Mawr College, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 
Clara Vail Brooks, '97 
Margaret Ayer Barnes, '07 
Elizabeth Bent Clark, '95 
Mary Crawford Dudley, '95 
Elizabeth Caldwell Fountain, '97 
Elizabeth B. Kirkbride, '96 
Mary Peirce, '12 
Caroline McCormick Slade, '96 
Myra Elliot Vauclain, '08 



1920] Annual Report of Alumnae Association 25 

Louise Watson, '12 Secretary 1900 

Louise Congdon Francis, '00 ex-officio Cornelia Halsey Kellogg (Mrs. F. R. 

Bertha S. Ehlers, '09 ex-officio Kellogg), 25 Colles Avenue, Morristown, 

N.J. 

ALUMNAE MEMBERS OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

1901 

OF BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 

__ Beatrice McGeorge, Cynwyd, Pa. 

Elizabeth B. Klrkbrlde, '96, 1406 Spruce 

Street, Philadelphia, Pa., Dec. 1915-Dec. 1902 

1921. H. Jean Crawford, Bryn Mawr College, 

Frances Flncke Hand, '97 (Mrs. Learned Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Hand), 142 East 65th Street, New York 1903 

City. Dec. 1918-Dec. 1921. „ „ „ _ ., 

Eleanor Fleisher Riesman (Mrs. David 

Riesman), 1715 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, 

CLASS COLLECTORS p 

1889 1904 

Anne Taylor Simpson (Mrs. Frank H. Simp- Isabel M. Peters, 33 West 49th St., New 
son), College Hill, Cincinnati, O. York City. 

1890 1905 

Margaret Patterson Campbell (Mrs. Rich- Margaret Nichols Hardenbergh (Mrs. C. 

ard C. Campbell), 1075 Penn Avenue, M. Hardenbergh), 3710 Warwick Boulevard 

Denver, Colo. Kansas Cit ^' Ma 

1891 1906 

Anna Swift Rupert (Mrs. Charles G. Rupert), Elizabeth Harrington Brooks (Mrs. Arthur 
Sedgeley, Marshallton, Del. Brooks) 5 Ash Street ' Cambridge, Mass. 

1907 
1893 

Alice M. Hawkins, Merion Hall, Bryn Mawr, 

Susan Frances Van Kirk, 1333 Pine Street, p a> 

Philadelphia, Pa. 1Q0S 

1894 Olive Kelly Craig (Mrs. George Craig), 12 
Abby Brayton Durfee (Mrs. Randall N. Radnor Way, Radnor, Pa. 

Durfee), 19 Highland Avenue, Fall River, 1909 

Mass. 

Evelyn Holt Lowry (Mrs. Philip W. Lowry), 

1895 450 Riverside Drive, New York City. 
Annette Hall Phillips (Mrs. Howard M. 

Phillips, Jr.), 6809 Cresheim Road, German- 1910 

town, Philadelphia, Pa. Hilda W. Smith, 219 Roberts Road, Bryn 

Mawr, Pa. 

1896 19U 

R ^ H I DE ^,f P ?*T (MrS ' JameS F ' P ° rter) ' Florence Leopold Wole (Mrs. Lester Wolf), 
Hubbard Woods, 111. c , , „ , ,,,, . v _ , _, 

' Shoemaker Road, Elkins Park, Pa. 

1897 1913 

Clara Vail Brooks (Mrs Henry S. Brooks), Elizabeth y> Ma 3813 s Street 

Ardsley-on-Hudson, N. Y. Philadelphia, Pa. 

1898 1914 

Elizabeth Nlelds Bancroft (Mrs. Wilfred M ary C. Smith, 1108 Spruce Street, Phila- 
Bancroft), Harrisville, R. I. delphia, Pa. 

1899 1915 

Emma Guffey Miller (Mrs. Carroll Miller), Katharine W. McCollin, 2213 St. James 
4 Von Lent Place, Pittsburgh, Pa. Place, Philadelphia, Pa. 



26 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[April 



Mary G. Branson, Rosemont, Pa. 



1916 1918 
Katharine T. Sharpless, Haverford, Pa. 

1917 1919 

Mary R. Hodge, 420 West Walnut Lane, Louise H. Wood, 1154 West Pine Street, 



German town, Philadelphia. 



Winnetka, 111. 



THE MINUTES OF THE ANNUAL MEETING 



The annual meeting of the Alumnae Associ- 
ation was called at 2.00 o'clock, on January 28. 
In order to allow as much time as possible for 
the special business of the year, the Endowment 
Fund, the reading of the minutes and of all re- 
ports, except that of the board of directors and 
a part of the report of the academic committee, 
was omitted. All reports, including that of the 
academic committee, are printed in the April 
Quarterly. 

The Secretary then read, and the Association 
ratified, the appointments to standing com- 
mittees made by the Board of Directors. 

The Secretary then announced the election 
of officers as follows: President, Louise Cong- 
don Francis, '00; vice-president, Leila Hough- 
teling, '11; recording secretary, Myra Elliot 
Vauclain, '08; corresponding secretary, Kath- 
arine W. McCollin, '15; treasurer, Bertha S. 
Ehlers, '09. New member of academic com- 
mittee, Eleanor Lord, Ph.D. 

Districts Report 

At 3.00 o'clock the Association began upon 
its special business of the year, the $2,000,000 
Campaign for Salaries. The following action 
was taken: 

1. Motions were passed as follows: 

(a) That the fund at present held for the 
Victory Chair of French be kept in the hands 
of the Treasurer of the Alumnae Association 
until complete ($100,000) and then be given as 
a whole to the Treasurer of Bryn Mawr College 
as a part of the $2,000,000 Endowment Fund. 

(b) That the part of the expenses of the 
Alumnae Association for the year 1919 propor- 
tionate to the amount of time used for Endow- 
ment Fund work, shall be paid from the funds 
collected for Endowment; the amount not to 
exceed 10 per cent of the funds collected during 
the year. 

(c) That it be recommended to the National 
Committee that for the duration of the cam- 
paign, the Central Office of the Alumnae Asso- 
ciation be considered part of the machinery of 
the campaign and, in so far as the work of the 



office pertains to the Endowment Fund, be 
financed on the same basis as the District 
Offices. 

2. In the absence of Edna Fischel Gellhorn, 
'00, Chairman of the Anna Howard Shaw 
Memorial, Caroline McCormick Slade, '96, 
made an informal report upon the connection 
of Miss Shaw with Bryn Mawr College and the 
appropriateness of such a memorial to Miss 
Shaw. Mrs. Slade told the Alumnae Associ- 
ation how Miss Anthony and Miss Shaw in the 
year 1906, when the suffrage forces were having 
a particularly difficult time with no suffrage 
victory in sight, came to Miss Thomas and Miss 
Garrett with the plea that they arrange a col- 
lege night for the great suffrage convention to 
be held in Baltimore and that they help to 
make this convention the most successful one 
ever held. Miss Thomas and Miss Garrett 
not only arranged the college night, but Miss 
Garrett opened her house in Baltimore and 
together they received the delegates there and 
assumed the responsibility for the conference. 
Together, after this conference, they offered to 
assume the financial responsibility for the suf- 
frage party for the next five years, guaranteeing 
$60,000, the necessary amount to carry the party 
for that period. Miss Anthony had then felt 
as Miss Shaw felt years later when, on the night 
on which New York won suffrage, she said, with 
tears rolling down her cheeks: "The suffrage 
victory is won." 

Mrs. Slade stated that we would ask the 
National Suffrage Association at its convention 
in Chicago on February 13 for a formal adoption 
of the establishment of a department at Bryn 
Mawr College as its memorial to Anna Howard 
Shaw. 

3. Reports were then made by the District 
Chairmen as follows: 

(a) District No. 1 — New England, excluding 
Connecticut. Margaret Blaine, '13, reported 
for the District, stating that the organization 
headquarters are at 367 Boylston Street, Bos- 
ton. She said a beginning had been made of 
approaching the Alumnae in the 10 sections 



1920] 



Annual Report of Alumnae Association 



27 



into which the District has been divided. From 
110 people in Boston $10,533 had come in. 
From the District as a whole $11,475 had been 
received to date. 

(b) District No. 2— Connecticut, New York, 
New Jersey. In the absence of Louise Fleisch- 
mann Maclay, '06, Frances Fincke Hand '97, 
reported on the organization of the District. 
Mrs. Hand described as especially interesting 
and as a useful suggestion for other Districts, a 
publicity supper which had been given by Mrs. 
Maclay and which had proved particularly 
successful. A number of reporters and editors 
were invited to dine at the Bryn Mawr Club. 
About 40 guests were present. Among the 
magazines represented were Vogue, The De- 
lineator, and The Woman's Home Companion. 
The newspapers represented were The World, 
The Post, The Sun, and The Telegraph. Acting 
President Helen Taft spoke on "The Higher 
Education of Women." By special arrange- 
ment, the representative of The Delineator, a Mt. 
Holyoke woman who disapproved of college 
training, stated her objections. This made 
possible an answer of those objections and an 
open discussion at the end of which the sym- 
pathies of the press were quite generally won 
over. 

Cornelia Halsey Kellogg, '00, Chairman for 
New Jersey, reported for New Jersey where 
Mrs. Blackwell, Mrs. Speer and she had already 
begun to cover the state from Ventnor to the 
very northern part. "With only one or two 
alumnae in a place, it is not difficult to organ- 
ize," said Mrs. Kellogg, "but difficult to do 
anything," 

(c) District No. 3 — Pennsylvania and Dela- 
ware. Elizabeth Kirkbride '96, Chairman, re- 
ported for Pennsylvania, exclusive of Phila- 
delphia, stating that an initial letter had been 
sent to every Alumna in the state enclosing 
Potential Donor blanks. About twenty-two 
centers had been formed in which former stu- 
dents had been asked to act as Chairmen. 
Pittsburgh, for which a Chairman had not yet 
been appointed, had already begun working on 
the idea of Men's Committees and was in touch 
with every Alumna in its neighborhood and 
ready to begin work. Miss Kirkbride empha- 
sized especially the value of Men's Committees 
and articles in local newspapers throughout the 
state — not only in the big cities. Miss Kirk- 
bride stated that Mrs. Hoag would act as Chair- 
man for Pennsylvania and Mrs. Bancroft for 
Delaware. 



Gertrude Ely '99, reported for Philadelphia. 
"Philadelphia has been given $750,000 to raise 
for the Endowment Fund. There is no city 
that cares less for women's education than 
Philadelphia, but we must raise that amount. 
We have publicity and are doing our utmost. 
I do recommend publicity. Philadelphia cannot 
be moved if not through those channels. I be- 
lieve, with Mrs. Jarrett, that 'whispering' is a 
splendid way." Miss Ely reported that Phila- 
delphia was getting together a Men's Committee 
and recommended particularly a small com- 
mittee of about 8 members. Miss Ely further 
recommended a dinner such as the one held 
January 28 for prominent invited guests in 
Philadelphia, at which Mr. Taft and President 
Neilson of Smith spoke. "There is nothing 
better in a place that is difficult," said Miss 
Ely, "than a feast." 

Marion Reilly '01, reported on the canvass of 
alumnae and former students in Philadelphia. 
There are about 750 alumnae and former stu- 
dents in the Philadelphia District. Miss Reilly 
reported that 166 of these had been interviewed 
to date and that something over $12,000 had 
been received from 70 subscribers. 

Elizabeth Nields Bancroft '98, reported for 
Delaware. "We are making progress. We 
were given a list of names with addresses, only 
to find that all belonged to the I. W. W. We 
have there 5 or 6 very enthusiastic Bryn Mawr 
people. There is lots of money in Delaware. 
We have great hopes." 

(d) District No. 4 — District of Columbia, 
Maryland, Virginia, and West Virginia. Amy 
Steiner '99, Chairman, reported that Baltimore 
had begun a week ago and had up to that time 
been able only to get a working force together, 
but had already many appointments in the 
District of Columbia, Virginia and West Vir- 
ginia. The beginning of organization for the 
real work would take place with the giving of 
a dinner the next week by Olga Kelly in Balti- 
more. 

(e) District No. 5 — Alabama, Florida, Georgia, 
Kentucky, Louisana, Mississippi, North Caro- 
lina, South Carolina, and Tennessee. Julia Duke 
Henning '97, reported, "We have not even 
made a beginning. There have been two 
kinds of responses from southern alumnae — 
some positively refuse to help and others very 
enthusiastic, but far away from the South at 
present. The Chairman of Mississippi who is 
spending the winter in Denver, has formed a 
club with other alumnae for work there. But 



28 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[April 



we do hope that sometime the South may be 
made to feel that Bryn Mawr is a national 
asset." 

(/) District No. 6— Ohio. Ruth Strong 
Strong '03, reported that Mr. Charles Taft had 
promised $5,000 provided Cincinnati would 
raise $10,000 more. Cleveland, Mrs. Strong 
said, had just started. Mrs. Strong offered 
Mrs. Henning a very enthusiastic alumna 
from Toledo who would work in Miami, Florida. 

(g) District No. 7 — Indiana. Eliza Adams 
Lewis '93, reported that Indiana had just begun 
its organization — that Indianapolis itself had 
12 alumnae, all very enthusiastic. Elizabeth 
Holliday Hitz '16, had been appointed Chairman 
for Indianapolis. $1,925 had been contributed 
by 10 alumnae. It was hoped that a good deal 
would be brought in by the repetition of a play 
by the Indianapolis Dramatic Club. 

(h) District No. 8 — Michigan. Marianna 
Buffum Hill '01, reported that the committee 
to date had discovered 12 alumnae in Michigan 
and were rather encouraged. 

(i) District No. 9 — Illinois, Iowa, Minnesota, 
and Wisconsin. Susan Follansbee Hibbard '97, 
reported that Chicago had held three Endow- 
ment meetings about a month apart. They 
began with a meeting at which Paul Shorey 
spoke magnificently. "He quoted Greek and 
produced the old college atmosphere, and 
started us right." The second meeting was one 
at which Mrs. Slade spoke, and the third, one 
at which Miss Taft spoke. The committee, 
Mrs. Hibbard reported, had made three trips 
to adjoining states. First, three people went 
to Madison, Wisconsin. There 8 alumnae, of 
whom 6 are connected with the University of 
Wisconsin and who therefore quite clearly can- 
not ask for money for Bryn Mawr there, cour- 
ageously accepted at once their quota of $8,000 
and said: "We will raise it." Second, a Bryn 
Mawr expeditionary force went from Chicago 
to Milwaukee. Third, a similar expedition 
went to Minneapolis where Grace Clarke Wright 
'98, is Chairman. 

Mrs. Hibbard told of the 50-50 Club in 
Chicago by which the women give to Bryn Mawr 
what their husbands give to their colleges. 
Mrs. Hibbard reported further that the Chicago 
Committee had been working in connection 
with the suffrage program for the convention 
in Chicago — trying to convince people that 
Bryn Mawr is the proper place for a memorial 
to Dr. Shaw. 



Harriot Hough teling '07, Treasurer for Dis- 
trict No. 9, reported that $75,780 had been 
raised to date in the District. 

Progress in St. Louis 

(j) District No. 10 — Arkansas, Kansas, Mis- 
souri, Oklahoma, and Texas. Anna R. Dubach 
'19, reported for St. Louis. By means of a 
Christmas play given by little girls of 10 and 14, 
interest had been aroused in the college. 
$15,000 had already been raised in St. Louis 
and $25,000 more had been accepted as an 
additional quota for the District. Miss 
Dubach reported that St. Louis was going to 
join in the collection of funds with two other 
colleges, Smith and Washington University, 
and that the three colleges together hoped to 
realize $60,000 by bringing from Chicago a 
feature representing the Atlantic City Board- 
walk, with real sand and booths and scenery 
in the background representing the ocean. 
The St. Louis Committee hopes that some other 
city will be interested in trying this feature, for 
if a third city takes it, the cost will be consider- 
ably diminished. 

4. Mrs. Francis reported that the organiza- 
tion of the rest of the country was not definite. 
There are Bryn Mawr Clubs in San Francisco 
and in Los Angeles. Arizona, Colorado, 
Nebraska, New Mexico, Utah and Wyoming 
comprise District No. 11, whose Chairman is 
Margaret Patterson Campbell, '90. The follow- 
ing telegram had just been received from Mrs. 
Campbell: 

"Greetings from the 55 Bryn Mawr women 
in the 11th District. I am writing concerning 
my personal pledge of $25,000 in memory of my 
sister, Mary Patterson." 

Mrs. Slade' 's Address 

5. Caroline McCormick Slade, '96, National 
Chairman, then addressed the meeting. She 
spoke of the desperate situation of education in 
this country and the whole world, of the des- 
perate crisis for Bryn Mawr College, of the 
fact that $2,000,000 additional Endowment 
means that we need not immediately face the 
question of Bryn Mawr's dropping from the 
first rank, but that $2,000,000 is not enough- 
only an excellent beginning. She spoke of the 
apparent impossibility of the collection of such 
a large sum by such a small group of alumnae 
and of our change of attitude toward impossi- 
bilities — we have learned in the last five years 
to do the impossible and to go with difficult 



1920] 



Annual Report of Alumnae Association 



29 



tasks to the people who are so busy that they 
cannot take any more. She spoke of the awful 
lack of teachers throughout the country, 
140,000 teachers have resigned from the schools 
of America in the last year, and of the fact that 
there is no hope for the public schools until the 
private schools raise their salaries. "Bryn 
Mawr is not alone in this effort, it is part of a 
world movement to see that there are professors. 
The faculties of the colleges have stood by in 
this war emergency and have borne the cause 
of education in this country single handed." 

"Smith has gone ahead of us and this is 
helpful. We are all going to succeed together. 
It is unthinkable that we should all fail together. 
They have made it clear that the question of 
education, and the question of education for 
women, today is vital for the country." 

"It is not necessary to say again that I know 
that $2,000,000 is essential, but in my heart I 
think it is the least important thing Bryn 
Mawr will get out of this adventure. We are 
going to have a chance to see what our respon- 
sibilities are, a chance to see what all colleges 
should do for the country. We must make the 
country know what Bryn Mawr means to it." 

Mrs. Slade spoke further of the hope that, as 
we are going to ask the suffrage party to found 
a chair or, if they wall, a department, at Bryn 
Mawr in memory of Anna Howard Shaw, we 
might go to other organizations for gifts of 
$100,000. She spoke again of the fact that all 
the colleges who are working for Endowment 
as we are, are working for a common end, and 
ended with an announcement of the Round 
Table to be held on Monday for general discus- 
sion and interchange of ideas. 

The returns from the annual election follow: 

For President 

Louise Congdon Francis 454 

Elizabeth Bent Clark 138 

For Vice President 

Leila Houghtellng 412 

Sylvia Scudder Bowditch 175 

For Recording Secretary 

Myra Elliot Vauclain 478 

Leila R. Stoughton 109 

For Corresponding Secretary 

Katharine McCollln 366 

Mary G. Branson 207 

For Treasurer 

Bertha S. Ehlers 480 

Eleanor Bontecou 113 



For Member of Academic Committee 

Katharine Lord 357 

Eleanor Fleischer Riesman 228 

Alumnae Present 

Alumnae present at the annual meeting and 
Round Table: 

Ph.D. 

Mary Hamilton Swindler and Eleanor L. Lord. 

1889 
Lina Lawrence, Julia Cope Collins, Martha G. Thomas, 
Ella Riegel, Harriet Randolph and Anna Rhoads Ladd. 



1890 



Katharine M. Shipley. 

1893 
Helen Thomas Flexner, Lucy Martin Donnelly, Louise 
O. Fulton Gucker, Lucy Lewis, S. Frances Van Kirk and 
Eliza Adams Lewis. 



Abby Br ay ton Durfee. 



1894 



1895 



Madeline Vaughan Brown, Julia Langdon Loomis, 
Esther C. M. Steele, Jane Horner Hogue and Annette Hall 
Phillips. 

1896 
Elizabeth B. Kirkbride, Pauline Goldmark, Abigail 
Camp Dimon, Mary H. Swope, Clara E. Farr, Anna 
Scattergood Hoag, Katharine Innes Cook, Hilda Justice, 
Caroline McCormick Slade, Mary Mendinhall Mullen, 
Mary Crawford Dudley, Florence King and Lydia T. 
Boring. 

1897 
Elizabeth Caldwell Fountain, Frances Fincke* Hand, 
Susan Follansbee Hibbard, Julia Duke Henning, Eleanor 
O. Brownell, Sue A. Blake, Mary Agnes Gleim, Maiy L. 
Fay and Grace Albert. 

1898 
Elizabeth Nields Bancroft, Helen M. Zebley, Hannah 
T. Carpenter, Helen Williams Woodall, Martha Tracy, 
Edith Schoff Boericke and Mary DeHaven Bright. 

1899 

May S. Sax, M. Emma Guffey Miller, Gertrude Ely, 
Mary N. Browne, Katherine M. Blackwell, Ellen P. Kil- 
patrick, Charlotte L. McLean, Sylvia Scudder Bowditch 
and Amy Louise Steiner. 

1900 

Emily Waterman Palmer, Lois Farnham Horn, Mary 
Kilpatrick, Cornelia Halsey Kellogg, Margaretta Levering 
Brown, Maud Lowrey Jenks and Louise Congdon Francis. 

1901 
Beatrice McGeorge, Bertha M. Laws, Mary E. Allis, 
Ethel Cantlin Buckley, Fanny Sinclair Woods, Alice 
Dillingham, Marianna Buffum Hill and Marion Reilly. 

1902 
Anne Hampton Todd, Edith T. Orlady, Kate Du Val 
Pitts, Irene Sheppard, Marion H. Emlen and Alice Day 
Jackson. 



30 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[April 



1903 

Elizabeth Shepley Sergeant, Elizabeth Eastman, Agatha 
Laughlin, Ethel Girdwood Peirce, Linda B. Lange, Eliza- 
beth Snyder, Emma C. Bechtel, Doris Earle, Elsie Lowrey, 
Ruth Strong Strong, Eleanor Fleisher Riesman and Mar- 
garet E. Brusstar. 

1904 

Isabel M. Peters, Hilda Canan Vauclain, Martha Rock- 
well Moorhouse, Emma Osborn Thompson and Leda 
Florence White. 

1905 

Elsie Tattersfield Banes, Elma Loines, Alice G. 
Howland, Helen R. Sturgis, Miriam Johnson and Esther 
Lowenthal. 

1906 

Helen Sandison and Laura F. Boyer. 



1907 

Harriot Hough teling, Eunice Schenck, Mary Antoinette 
Cannon, Julie Benjamin Howson, Marie H. Ballin, Mary 
Isabelle O'Sullivan, Helen Lamberton, Alice Martin 
Hawkins, Katharine V. Harley and Athalia L. Crawford. 

1908 

Agnes Goldman, Adelaide Case, Margaret Y. Kent, 
Edith Chambers Rhoads, Helen North Hunter, Mary 
Kinsley Best, Grace Woodelton. 

1909 

Frances Browne, Edith Adair, Emma White Mitchell, 
Helen C. Irey, Anna E. Harlan, Lillian Laser Strauss and 
Bertha S. Ehlers. 

1910 

Lillie James, Hilda W. Smith, Sidney Garrigues 
Edwards, Agnes M. Irwin, Bessie Cox Wolstenholme and 
Susanne Allinson Emery. 



1911 

Marion Crane Carroll, May Egan Stokes and Ellen E. 
Pottberg. 

1912 
Louise Watson, Florence Glenn Zipf, Elizabeth Pinney 
Hunt, Gertrude Elcock, Mary Peirce, Christine Hammer 
and Marjorie L. Thompson. 

1913 
R. Beatrice Miller, Margaret G. Blaine, Elizabeth 
Taylor Shipley, Alice Patterson Bensinger, Helen Evans 
Lewis, Katharine Williams Hodgdon, Olga Kelly, Apphia 
Thwing Hack, Marjorie Frances Murray and Helen J. 
Barrett. 

1914 
Mary Shipley Allinson, Marjorie Childs, M. Isabel 
Bering and Caroline Newton. 

1915 
Helen Taft, Elsie H. Steltzer, Amy Lawrence Martin 
Isabel F. Smith, Ruth Glenn Pennel!, Ruth Hubbard, 
Emily E. Van Horn, Katherine E. Sheafer, Frances E. 
Boyer, Isabel Foster and Katharine W. McCollin. 

1916 
Alice E. Van Horn, Clara W. Heydemann, Ruth E. 
Lautz, Catherine S. Godley, Agnes P. Smith, Constance E. 
Dowd, Helen C. Robertson, Mary G. Branson and Florence 
Hitchcock. 

1917 
Hildegarde.K. Kendig, Eleanor Lansing Dulles, Helen 
M. Harris and A. Dorothy Shipley. 

1918 
Virginia Kneeland, Leslie Richardson, Therese M. Born 
and Sarah Wistar Morton. 

1919 
Frances Branson Keller, Margaret Gilman, Helen E. 
Spalding, Margaret W. Rhoads, Margaret McAllister 
Janeway, Rebecca Reinhardt and Anna R. Dubach. 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS 



Once more the Board of Directors appears 
before the Alumnae Association to report 
changes in its own personnel. During the 
year Johanna KroeberMosenthal, '00, has been 
obliged to resign as Vice-President of the 
Association and her place has been filled by- 
Leila Houghteling, '11. Hilda W. Smith, '10, 
resigned as Recording Secretary when she 
became Dean of the college and Myra Elliot 
Vauclain, '08, was appointed by the Board to 
fill the vacancy. In the report last year, the 
Board of Directors suggested that the Alumnae 
Association was fast outgrowing its organiza- 
tion and that the time was not far distant when 
it would be necessary for us to have a paid 
executive officer. The increased activities of 
the Alumnae Association last spring emphasized 
this need and in June, 1919, the Board appointed 



one of its own members, Bertha Ehlers, '09, 
Executive Secretary of the Alumnae Associa- 
tion, with a salary of $2000 a year. It is the 
hope of the Board that the members of the 
Association will approve this appointment and 
will see that our expansion has borne fruit. 
Aside from the deliberations of the Board of 
Directors, the work of the Association has been 
carried on as usual by standing committees 
and by special committees. 

Endoivment Idea Grows 

Ever since the end of the war the need for 
increased salaries among the faculty has been 
acute. Last April a suggestion was made that 
we might raise $100,000 for the endowment of 
a professorship in connection with the Victory 
Loan. About $60,000 was raised during the 



1920J 



Annual Report of Alumnae Association 



31 



spring. Since then $11,000 more has been 
added to this fund. 

But even with the Victory Chair complete it 
was evident by Commencement that an in- 
creased endowment of $100,000 was wholly 
inadequate to the situation and the faculty 
themselves initiated a campaign for $1,000,000 
for increased salaries. In order to help with 
this campaign, the alumnae called a conference 
at Bryn Mawr in September before the opening 
of college. When the need of increasing teach- 
ing salaries was made clear to that small but 
enthusiastic group of alumnae, they voted 
almost unanimously that we must raise, not 
$1,000,000 but $2,000,000 in order that salaries 
of the teaching staff might be increased at 
least 50 per cent. Until this annual meeting 
the cooperation of the Alumnae could not be 
ratified nor could it be definitely decided what 
should be done with the money raised for the 
Victory Chair of French when it was completed. 
The finance committee has made a recommen- 
dation which is endorsed by the Board of 
Directors of the Alumnae Association, that this 
fund of $100,000 for the Victory Chair be kept 
in the hands of the treasurer of the Alumnae 
Association until complete and then given, as a 
whole, to the treasurer of Bryn Mawr College 
as a part of the $2,000,000 Endowment. 

It is for the Alumnae Association today to 
endorse the part which we have already taken 
in this' campaign. The Board of Directors up 
to this time has acted on behalf of the Associa- 
tion, never doubting for a moment that the 
Association would heartily endorse our action. 
Our organization at this time shows our faith 
that the Alumnae Association will approve our 
participation in this campaign originated by 
the faculty and endorsed by the directors of 
the college. The Board of Directors of the 
Alumnae Association felt that our first task was 
a 100 per cent interest among the alumnae and 
former students of Bryn Mawr. We decided, 
therefore, to make a campaign for increased 
membership among the former students and 
to reinstate those few members of the Associa- 
tion who had been dropped for nonpayment of 
dues. The notice which went out stated that 
unless those invited declined to join the Alum- 
nae Association, their membership would be 
assumed. The result has been most gratifying. 
We have received letters from 103 former 
students saying that they desired to be asso- 
ciate members, letters from 60 saying that they 



do not so desire, 537 have not answered the 
letter at all. We are assuming that a large 
part at least of the latter also wish to be mem- 
bers of our Association. 

The increased organization and the increased 
activities of the Alumnae Association have 
involved considerable increase in our budget. In 
1918 we had a deficit of $483 and we voted to 
increase the dues. At the end of 1919, before the 
new dues have gone into effect, but after a year 
of unprecedented growth, we have a deficit of 
$1857.55 and if we are to have no other source 
of income but the increased dues, which of 
course include the subscription to the Quar- 
terly, we estimate that we shall have a deficit 
at the end of 1920 of $2485. One item of 
increased expenditure is postage which will 
serve to show our increased correspondence. 
In the year 1917 we spent $99 for postage; in 
the year 1918, with 3 cent stamps, we spent 
$159; in the year 1919, half the year with 3 
cent and half the year with 2 cent stamps, we 
spent $591.67; and we estimate for the year 
1920, $500 for postage. Needless to say there 
is no expectation on the part of the Board of 
Directors that the dues of the Alumnae Associa- 
tion can cover our increased expenses. 

Financing Alumnae Office 

The Board of Directors hesitated to decide 
alone some of the important questions which 
have arisen during the past year and in October 
a meeting was held with the chairmen of stand- 
ing committees to deliberate upon methods of 
financing the Alumnae Association. Follow- 
ing that meeting a meeting was held by the 
Finance Committee at which they made the 
following recommendation; this recommenda- 
tion, endorsed by the Board of Directors, the 
Alumnae Association will be asked to act upon: 

"That the part of the expenses of the Alum- 
nae Association for the year 1919 proportion- 
ate to the amount of time used for the Endow- 
ment Fund work, shall be paid from the funds- 
collected for endowment; the amount not to 
exceed 10 per cent of the funds collected during 
the year; and that it be recommended to the 
National Committee that the Central Alumnae 
Office be considered part of the machinery of 
the campaign and be financed as such on the- 
same basis as the District Offices." 

In accepting this report, the Alumnae Asso- 
ciation is asked to accept it merely as a matter 



32 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[April 



of record and the members of the Association 
will be asked afterward to vote separately on 
the recommendations included herein. 

Necrology 

During the year the following members of 
the Alumnae Association have died and I will 
ask the members of the Association to express 
their sympathy by a silent rising vote: 

Marie Elizabeth Belleville 1909 

Mary Elizabeth Doheny Dougherty 

(Mrs. E. J. Dougherty) 1910 

Mabel Hutchinson Douglass (Mrs. 
John Henry) 1889 



Christine Orrick Fordyce (Mrs. 

William C.) 1899 

Adeline Pepper Gibson. . . . (Hearer) '14-'17 

Carrie Anna Harper Ph.D. 

Evelyn Hunt 1898 

Helen Stieglitz Jurist 1909 

Willette Eastham Lincoln 1902 

Leila Verplanck North 1896 

Eleanor Vallely O'Connell (Mrs. 

Geoffrey C.) 1908 

Annabella Elliott Richards 1907 

Catherine Lillie Westling 1914 

Rose Young 1907 

Respectfully submitted, 

Louise Congdon Francis. 



REPORT OF THE ACADEMIC COMMITTEE 



In the records of the Academic Committee 
for the last year the following minute stood out 
from the rest, and offered itself as an appropri- 
ate introduction to the story of our work in 
this unique year. Towards the end of one of 
our long meetings at which academic problems 
of various types were discussed it was voted: 
"that the Academic Committee in going over 
the various problems brought to its attention 
finds that the fundamental need of the College 
Is financial and that academic questions all 
revert to this need as a basis for their solution. 
. . . . The Academic Committee would 
like to recommend to the Board of Directors 
that they ask the Finance Committee of the 
Alumnae Association about the possibility of a 
drive for a large sum of money to be used for 
Endowment." This happened in April last. 
In June the Faculty had a similar inspiration, 
and acted upon it. We did not realize how 
soon we should all be working heart and soul 
for that large sum. 

Changes in Faculty 

There have been a number of changes in the 
Faculty, all of which are reported in detail in 
the November Quarterly. The most notable 
change is the loss of Dr. Frank who has been 
called to Johns Hopkins. Even those of us 
who did not have the good fortune to work 
under him at some time during his sixteen 
years here know something of what his orig- 
inality of mind, his fine scholarship, and his 
constructive work in connection with faculty 
reorganization have contributed to Bryn 
Mawr's academic achievement; and we realize 



how fortunate we are to have had him identi- 
fied with the college for so long a time. 

Besides President Thomas, three members 
of the Faculty are away this year — Mr. and 
Mrs. William Roy Smith travelling in China 
and India, and Miss King studying in Spain. 

As you all undoubtedly know, Dr. Jessen 
died early in the autumn. The College is per- 
manently indebted to him for his scholarly 
achievement and for his constant insistence on 
the highest academic standards. Dr. Edward 
Prokosch who comes with a very high reputa- 
tion as a scholar in philology, has been appointed 
in Dr. Jessen's place, and is carrying the philo- 
logical work of the English Department, in 
addition to the German. 

M. A. Degree 

As the alumnae are aware, there has been 
from time to time a good deal of criticism of 
the regulation of Bryn Mawr that the M. A. 
degree be granted only to its own graduates. 
Last spring one or two colleges sent memorials 
on this subject which made it seem necessary 
to the Faculty to appoint a committee to con- 
sider the question of opening the degree to the 
graduates of other colleges. The Committee 
of the Faculty requested the Academic Com- 
mittee to consider the matter and to confer 
with them at a meeting in November. 

At the conference there was a full and frank 
discussion of the question. The Committee of 
the Faculty reported much division of opinion. 
Those members of the Faculty who opposed a 
change in the rule felt that Bryn Mawr should 
continue to admit to graduate work the holder 



1920] 



Annual Report of Alumnae Association 



33 



of any A. B. degree, but that the variety both 
in college entrance requirements and in require- 
ments for the college degree would make it 
unwise to give a Bryn Mawr degree for a single 
year's work. They held that Bryn Mawr 
Masters degrees granted under such conditions 
would cease to have uniform value and, more- 
over, could not stand for the distinctive train- 
ing Bryn Mawr tries to give. Faced with the 
injustice of withholding the degree from grad- 
uates of colleges of equal standing with Bryn 
Mawr who had completed the full requirements, 
they advocated abolishing the degree. The 
majority of the Faculty Committee held that 
the work required for the degree could be so 
defined as to avoid the difficulties pointed out 
and that the degree was too valuable to abolish, 
both as a stimulus to advanced work and as a 
commercial asset to teachers in preparatory 
schools. The Academic Committee agreed 
with the Committee of The Faculty and was, 
moreover, strongly of the opinion that Bryn 
Mawr by refusing the degree was losing the 
better type of short term graduate student and 
was not getting the most serious work of the 
student who did not go on for the Ph.D. The 
Academic Committee, therefore, submitted the 
following recommendations: 

Voted: The Academic Committee of the 
Alumnae believes that the M.A. degree is not 
regarded as a merely cultural degree by modern 
graduate students and that it has an important 
commercial value, especially to teachers in 
secondary schools. The committee has the 
impression that the more serious work in the 
graduate school at Bryn Mawr is done by 
candidates for degrees. It, therefore, believes 
that it would strengthen the graduate work at 
Bryn Mawr to permit graduates of approved 
colleges to declare themselves candidates for 
the M.A. As the standard of the M.A. should 
then be carefully guarded, the committee urges 
that the requirements be definitely formulated 
in terms of work rather than of time, so as to 
insure a minimum standard of achievement. 
They suggest the value of a term of probation 
for all candidates, at the end of which inade- 
quate students might be eliminated. 

At a conference held on the Friday before the 
annual meeting it was learned that the Faculty 
expect to decide the matter soon. 

Proposed Educational Survey 

In the present crisis in higher education 
which necessitates the various college drives 



for endowment, the Education Committee of 
the Associate Alumnae of Vassar College has 
proposed to other alumnae associations a joint 
survey of teaching conditions in the colleges 
educating women. The object is to obtain 
light if possible on modes of maintaining high 
teaching standards and encouraging the right 
type of woman student to enter the profession 
of college teaching. The Academic Committee 
have considered the plan carefully and talked 
it over informally with a committee of the 
Faculty; however they are convinced that it 
will be impossible for Bryn Mawr alumnae to 
enlist actively in the survey this spring, since 
their share in the expense would approximate 
$2000. If the opportunity is still open at a 
later date for alumnae cooperation in this 
educational enterprise, the Academic Commit- 
tee will give the project more consideration and 
report further. 

Pensions 

The last year brought one important change 
in the pension situation: in response to insistent 
demand on the part of the Association of 
American University Professors, the Carnegie 
Foundation agreed that the associated colleges 
might make the purchase of an annuity by the 
professor voluntary instead of compulsory. 
The problems of participating policies, mutuali- 
zation and control continued to be subjects of 
much controversy. 

At Bryn Mawr the Faculty and Trustees are 
at present at work upon a plan similar to one 
adopted at Wells, Brown, and Yale which 
makes it possible for the teacher to take out an 
annuity either in the Carnegie Company or in 
some other company as he himself may elect. 

Conference Committee 

In response to a suggestion made by the 
Academic Committee, that a closer connection 
between this Committee and the Conference 
Committee might prove valuable in bringing 
undergraduate matters to the attention of the 
alumnae, a member of the Academic Committee 
was this year appointed to the Conference 
Committee. 

Entrance Examinations 

We have done very little on entrance exam- 
ination problems save to watch the progress of 
certain tendencies. An important problem is 



34 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[April 



that involved in the tendency to lessen classical 
requirements. Some colleges no longer require 
Latin for entrance. Many schools agree in 
this policy and have tried with small success to 
bring pressure to bear on all colleges to comply 
with it. There will be more to report on this 
and other entrance matters next year. 

Appointments Bureau 

At a meeting with the President and Dean 
in January 1920 the Appointments Bureau was 
discussed. This department of the College 
is most important and is one which demands 
particularly the cooperation of the Alumnae. 
The Academic Committee hopes that with the 
reorganization of the Alumnae Association a 
definite plan will be made for keeping the 
Bureau in touch with alumnae in every com- 
munity. 

Education and the Association 

The need for scholarships at Bryn Mawr 
becomes more apparent than ever as living 
expenses both for the girl in college and the 
family at home increase. We must provide 
for the daughter of the man whose income has 
not increased. She is often the best academic 
material, and the privately endowed college is 
more and more in danger of losing her. to the 
state college whose fees are less. We look to 
the time when the communities which send out 
the girls shall come to regard the duty of rais- 
ing scholarships as part of their responsibility 
to education. Indeed it is necessary now for 
alumnae to try to understand what is their 
educational responsibility. In these days when 



high standards of education are being threat- 
ened, college women everythere are appealing 
to their communities for money — the material 
factor in saving the situation. But when we 
have raised the money we have then to do a 
harder task. As has been said, we are facing 
the extinction of a profession; we must make it 
possible in the future that our teachers shall 
continue to be the leaders of our democracy. 
We must conceive high standards for then- 
work. We must honor them and trust them 
when they maintain these standards. We must 
encourage freedom of thought and speech. 
We must make possible for them a wide expe- 
rience of books and people, of travel and study 
in other lands. 

This realized responsibility in educational 
matters will give new meaning and permanence 
to the organized activity which the Alumnae 
Association is creating in connection with the 
drive. When in the future the Council of the 
Faculty calls upon the Academic Committee 
for alumnae opinion on an academic question, 
it should be possible for the Committee to call 
upon representatives in every community to 
tell them, what the people concerned there are 
thinking on this particular subject. When for 
instance a teacher in a preparatory school 
presents an entrance examination problem to 
them, they will be able to turn to Bryn Mawr 
teachers in other communities for a full and 
quick response. There is no end to the prac- 
tical possibilities of the alumnae organization 
which is now being created for the raising of 
our Endowment. Next year, after the Endow- 
ment is completed, will be the time to improve 
this organization and to do it with energy and 
dispatch in the cause of education. 



REPORT OF FINANCE COMMITTEE 



The work of the Finance Committee has been 
closely connected with that of the Board of 
Directors and the report of this committee is 
covered by that of the Board and in detail by 
the Treasurer of the Association. 

The work for the Victory Chair of French 
very much increased the interest in and impor- 
tance of class collections and resulted in a total 
of $48,477.70 as a result of the class collections 
in 1919. 

The work for the Two Million Endowment 
will be done to a large extent through district 



and city organization but the class machinery 
is most valuable in keeping every alumna and 
former student interested and enthusiastic 
from a class as well as local pride. 

At a meeting of the Finance Committee held 
on December 16, 1919, the following resolution 
was passed and presented to the Board of 
Directors: 

Resolved: That the fund of $100,000 for the 
Victory Chair be kept in the hands of the 
Treasurer of the Alumnae Association until 
complete, and then be given, as a whole, to the 



1920] Annual Report of Alumnae Association 35 

Treasurer of Bryn Mawr College as a part of Resolved: That it be recommended to the 

the $2,000,000 Endowment. National Committee that for the duration of 

The same meeting passed the following reso- the campaign the central office of the Alumnae 

lution to be sent to the Board of Directors: Association be considered part of the machinery 

Resolved: That the part of the expenses of of the campaign, and in so far as the work of 

the Alumnae Association for the year 1919 the office pertains to the Endowment Fund, be 

proportionate to the amount of time used for financed on the same basis as the district 

Endowment work be paid from the funds col- offices. 

lected for Endowment, the amount not to On behalf of the Finance Committee, 

exceed 10 per cent of the funds collected during Martha G. Thomas, 

the year. Chairman. 

REPORT OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 
I. Alumnae Academic Endowment Fund of January 15, 1909 

Principal: 

Cash and securities received January IS, 1909 $100,000.00 

Net additions because of differences between par value and value at which securities were taken and 

sold 1,833 .64 

Transferred from income account 2,235 .08 

$104,068.72 
Investments: 

Chicago, Rock Island and Pacific Rwy . Co. , General Mortgage. 4% $3 ,000 . 00 

New York Central and Hudson River R. R. Co. 3§% 5,000.00 

Chicago, Burlington and Quincy R. R. Co., Illinois Division Mtge. 4% 5,000 .00 

Standard Steel Works Co., 1st Mtge. 5% 5,000.00 

Cost of certain improvements on the College Grounds assumed as an investment for this Fund as 

agreed upon with the Alumnae Association. 4£% 25,000.00 

Northern Pacific Railway, General Lien. 3% 3,000.00 

Mortgage No. 7, Lombard Ave., Bryn Mawr, Pa. i\% 35,000 .00 

Southern Pacific Co. Equipment . \\% 10,000.00 

Pennsylvania General Freight Equipment. 4^% 3,000.00 

Pennsylvania R. R. Co., General Mortgage. 44% 5,000.00 

Bryn Mawr College Inn Association, Second Mortgage. 5% 1,000.00 

United States First Liberty Loan. 4i% 200 . 00 

Illinois Central R. R. Co. 5£% 3,000 .00 

Uninvested and due from the Trustees 868 . 72 

Total par value $104,068.72 

Income: - 

Receipts: 

Balance Sept. 30, 1918 $1,913 .22 

Interest on investments Oct. 1, 1918, to Sept. 30, 1919 4,541.41 $6,454.63 

Expenditures : 

Salary of holder of endowed chair $3,000.00 

Increase in salaries of three full professors who are heads of departments 1 ,500 . 00 

Balance 1,954 . 63 $6,454 . 63 

Note. — The amount ($3000) which but for this endowment would have been expended for the salary of the holder of 
the endowed chair was used to increase the salaries of six full professors who are heads of departments. 

II. Alumnae Academic Endowment Fund of June 2, 1910 

Principal: 

Received from Alumnae Association $150,000.00 

Net additions because of differences between par value and value at which securities were taken 

and sold 6,830 . 02 

Total par value of Fund $157,038.77 

Investments: — 

Chesapeake and Ohio Rwy. Co., General Mortgage. 4£% $25,000.00 

Mortgage No. 1, 12 acres Camden County, N. J. 6% 12,000.00 

New York Central Lines Equipment. \\% 10,000.00 

Norfolk and Western Railway Divisional First Lien and General Mortgage. 4% 22,000.00 

Chicago, Rock Island and Pacific Rwy. Co., First Refunding Mortgage. 4% 25,000.00 

Reading Company and Philadelphia and Reading Coal and Iron Co., General Mortgage. 4% 15,000.00 

Northern Pacific Rwy. Co., General Lien. 3% 2,000.00 

Baltimore & Ohio Equipment Trust. 4^% 2,000.00 

The Virginian Railway Co., 1st Mortgage. 5% 3,000 .00 

New York & Erie R. R. Co. 4% 5,000.00 

Lehigh Valley R. R. Co., General Consol. Mortgage. 4£-% 13,000 . 00 

Chicago Union Station Co., First Mortgage. 4|% 2,000 .00 

Wabash R. R. Co., Second Mortgage. 5% 6,000 .00 

Union Pacific R. R. Co., First Lien Refunding Mortgage. 4% 4,000.00 

Mortgage No. 4, 809 West Franklin St., Richmond, Va. 5% 3,500 .00 

Mortgage No. 5, 4281 Viola St., Philadelphia Pa. 5f%% 2,100.00 

$141,600.00 



36 The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly [April 

Brought forward $141,600.00 

United States First Liberty Loan. 4J% 1,100 .00 

Wabash R. R. Co., First Mortgage. 5% 3,000.00 

Mortgage No. 6, 1448 N. Vodges St., Philadelphia, Pa. 6% 1,200.00 

Uninvested and due from the Trustees 138.77 

Total par value $157,038.77 

Income: 

Receipts: 

Interest October 1, 1918 to September 30, 1919 $6,857.59 

Expenditures: 

Academic salaries $6,857 . 59 



SUMMARY OF INCOME AND EXPENDITURES OF BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 
For the Year October 1, 1918— to September 30, 1919 

INCOME 

Securities 

Founder's Endowment $21,982 .11 

Alumnae Endowment for Professorships 

of 1909 4,500.00 

Alumnae Academic Endowment of 1910 6,857.59 

Donors' Endowment 10,941 . 75 

Justus C. Strawbridge Fund 421 . 58 

Carola Woerishoff er Endowment 30,938 . 62 

Undergraduate May Day, 1914, Endow- 
ment Fund 125.80 

Elizabeth S. Shippen Endowment 8,166.45 

Margaret Kingsland Haskell Endowment. 3,000.00 

Class of 1919 Fund 15.39 

Mary Elizabeth Garrett Alumnae Memo- 
rial Fund 4,000 . 00 

Interest $3,827 .08 

Less net interest received at 

College 907.82 2,919.26 



$93,868.55 



Productive Real Estate 

Income from Founder's En- 
dowment invested in Mer- 
ion, Radnor, Denbigh, Pem- 
broke East and West $17,706.47 

Income from Founder's En- 
dowment invested in Pro- 
fessors' houses 2,791 .57 

$20,498.04 

Income from John D. Rockefeller En- 
dowment Invested in Rockefeller Hall.. 3,492.74 



23,990.78 
$117,859.33 



C. Income from Special Funds: 

Unexpended balances of In- 
come, October 1, 1918: 

A. Scholarship Funds $2,460.20 

B. Memorial Funds 4,241.02 

C. Other Funds 2,074.46 



$8,775.68 






1920] Annual Report of Alumnae Association 37 



Received during the year: 

a. For Memorial Scholar- 

ships (Hopper, Rhoads, 
Brooke Hall, Powers, 
Gillespie, Stevens, An- 
thony, Simpson, Hallo- 
well, Longstreth, Ship- 
pen, Kendrick, Huff, 
and Haskell) $5,087.33 

b. Other Memorial Funds: 

Ottendorfer Fellowship; 
Ritchie Prize; Rhoads, 
Chamberlain, Wright, 
and Stevens Book 
Funds; Swift Planting 
Fund 877.15 

c. Other Funds (1902 Book 

Fund; Alumnae Endow- 
ment Fund, Smiley 
Fund, Russell Fund, 
Haskell Fund and Gen- 
try Fund.) 2,694.14 



Unexpended balances October 1, 1919: 

A. Scholarship Funds 

B. Memorial Funds 

C. Other Funds 



Students' Fees: 

A. Added to College Income: 

Tuition 

Emergency Fees 

Laboratory Fees $4,073.86 

Laboratory Supplies 588.69 

Geological Excursions 112.50 

Graduation Fees 695 . 15 

Changing Rooms Fees 345.00 

Music Rooms Fees, net 48.50 

Entrance Examination 

Fees, net 9.15 

Tutoring Classes, net 246.50 



$8,658.62 



3,855.16 
4,207.46 
4,572.91 


$17,434.30 
12,635.53 




$87,572.05 
36,150.00 





$4,798.77 



6,119.35 



B. Given to Library for Books: 
Deferred and Condition 

Examination Fees $917 . 00 

Course Late Registration 

and Book Fines 156.00 1,073.00 



C. Given to Gymnasium for Apparatus: 

Gymnasium Fines 278.25 



$130,914.40 

$131,192.65 



38 The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly [April 

Net receipts from sale of books $44 . 10 

Interest on College Income invested in 1905 Infirmary, Trefa, Aelwyd, 

and prepaid insurance, Comptroller's bank balance, etc 907.82 

Net receipts from all other sources 1,317.99 

Donations to Current Income: 

Received during 1918-19 $12,736.56 

Unexpended balance of Donations re- 
ceived during previous years 4,612 .35 



$17,348.91 

Less balance unexpended September 30, 
1919 3,259.75 



14,089.16 

Total net receipts from all sources, expended for College running 

expenses, from October 1, 1918, to September 30, 1919 $270,209.82 

EXPENDITURES 
A.— ACADEMIC 
Teaching Salaries 

Paid from College Income.... $126,222.88 

Paid from Donations 2,415.92 

$128,638.80 

23 Full Professors 1 $67,600.00 

1\ Associate Professors 18,150.00 

6 Associates 9,477.65 

2 Lecturers 4,500.00 

16 Instructors 23,888.27 

3 Readers 1,600.00 

4 Demonstrators 2,200.00 

Student Assistants and Oral Classes 1,222.88 



Academic Administration Salaries 

(Only the portion of time 

given to Academic work is 

charged) 
Paid from College Income... . $21,245 .09 
Paid from Donations 652 . 19 



$21,897.28 



President, Deans, Secretaries and Stenog- 
raphers (part) $15,373.36 

Comptroller's Office (60%) 2,932 .45 

Business Office (60%) 3,331 .47 

Minutes of Directors (60%) 60.00 

Honorarium Secretary of Faculty 200.00 

Fellowships and Scholarships 

A. From College Income: 
Fellowships and Graduate 

Scholarships $13,375 . 00 

> Foreign Graduate Schol- 
arships 2,430.00 

Undergraduate Scholar- 
ships 3,938.67 

$19,743.67 



$128,638.80 



$21,897.28 



Note — One full Professor was on leave of absence at half salary. 



1920] 



Annual Report of Alumnae Association 



39 



B. From Income of Special Funds: 
Fellowship and Graduate 

Scholarships $871.80 

Undergraduate Scholar- 
ships 3,638.06 

C. From Donations: 
Fellowships and Graduate 

Scholarships 200.00 

Undergraduate Scholar- 
ships 5,175.00 

Laboratories 

A. From College Income: 

Physics 

Chemistry 

Geology 

Biology 

Experimental Psychology 

Applied Psychology 

Educational Psychology 

Social Economy 

B. From Donations 

Social Economy 



$4,509.86 



$5,375.00 



$1,596.96 
1,520.98 
854.87 
1,158.26 
991.22 
275.00 
117.88 
801.67 

$7,316.84 
600.00 



$29,628.53 



Library 

A. From College Income: 

Maintenance (one-half entire cost)... $6,180.45 

Salaries 7.857.63 

New Books Purchased 6,513.20 

$20,551.28 

B. From Income of Special Funds: 

New Books Purchased 257.62 

C. From Donations: 

New Books Purchased. $242 . 56 

Maintenance 14.45 

Furnishings 487 . 86 

_ 744.87 

Gymnasium 

From College Income: 

Maintenance of Building $5,215.89 

Salaries 4,165 . 19 

Apparatus 71 .00 

Religious Services 

College Entertaining 

Public Lectures 

Subscriptions to Foreign Schools 

American School at Athens $250.00 

American School at Jerusalem 100.00 

American School at Rome 250.00 

Naples Table Association 50.00 



7,916.84 
$188,081.45 



$21,553.77 



$9,452.08 

2,275.88 

394.63 

327.99 



$650.00 



40 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[April 



Subscription to Wood's Hole Biological Laboratory.. . . 
Subscription to College Entrance Examination Board. 
Subscription to Educational Societies 



$100.00 

100.00 

8.00 



Expense History and Language Examinations 

Class Room Supplies 

Expenditures from Special Funds for Modern Art 

Expenditures from Special Funds for Helen Ritchie Prize 

Bureau of Appointments 

Academic Committee of Alumnae, Travelling Expenses and Entertain- 
ment 

Expenses of Professors attending meetings of Professional Societies 

Expenses preparing Statistics for Faculty Committee 

Academic Incidentals 

Travelling Expenses of Candidates for Appointment 

Publicity 

Monographs 

Academic Administration Expenses 

Office Expenses (60%) 

Telephone (60%) 

Calendar, Register and Printing 

Employees' Compensation Insurance (60%) 



Maintenance of Academic Buildings 

(Taylor Hall, $8,939.46; Dalton Hall, $7,721.03; one- 
half of Library, $6,180.45; Rent of one-half of Cartref, 
$1,000.00; Advanced Psychological Laboratory, 
$332.75) 

Maintenance of Grounds and Fire Protection 

Legal Advice 

Academic Expenditures from Donations 

Expenses paid by Treasurer 

Interest 

Printing 

Auditing 

Comptroller's Bond 

Sundries 



Total Academic Expenditures. 



B.— NON-ACADEMIC ADMINISTRATION 
Salaries 

Paid from College Income... . $10,323.72 
Paid from Donations 434.79 



President's, Deans', Secretaries' and 

Stenographers' Salaries (part) 

Comptroller's Office (40%) 

Business Office (40%) 

Minutes of Directors (40%) 



$10,758.51 

6,542.56 

1,954.97 

2,220.98 

40.00 



$1,695.05 

879.91 

7,506.72 

585.53 



$208.00 
90.97 
1,373.45 
11.23 
20.06 
79.77 

345.82 
40.11 

166.83 
80.16 

513.42 
42.98 
96.28 



10,667.21 
24,173.69 





6,095.42 




50.00 




1,219.56 


$3,364.10 




196.75 




300.00 




50.00 




7.00 






3,917.85 






$271,928.61 



$10,758.51 



1920] Annual Report of Alumnae Association 41 

Expenses 

Office Expenses (40%) $1,130.04 

Telephone (40%) 586.60 

Employees' Compensation Insurance 

(60%) 390.36 

$2,107.00 

Grounds and Fire Protection 4,502.39! 

1905 Infirmary 

Salaries $5,140.96 

Expenses 6,860.05 

Interest on amount loaned to complete 

building 875.56 

Receipts: 12,876.57 

Undergraduate Students' 

Fees $3,640.00 

Graduate Students' Fees 260.00 

Hospital Charges to Stu- 
dents, etc 2,317.68 

All other income 654.82 

6,872.50 



Excess of Expense of Repairs to Deanery over Receipts 

for Rent 

Loss on Operating Yarrow West in Excess of Receipts 

from Rooms and Board 

Cost of Operating Llysyfryn in Excess of Receipts from 

Rooms 

Sundry Items of Non-academic Incidentals 

Christmas Donations 

Taxes for 1919 

Supply Room — Increases in Supplies on hand 

Auditing Financial Report for 1917-18 

Memorial Tablets paid from Donations 

Expenditures from Donations 

Permanent Improvements 

Auto Service, $2,725.00; Merion Hall, $21.62; Pem- 
broke Hall, $1,776.01 
Total Non-academic Expenditures $38,294.27 



56,004.07 


1,344.10 


1,718.71 


2,920.54 


6.00 


260.59 


196.72 


1,121.18 


185.00 


652.50 


1,994.33 


4,522.63 



Total Expenditures for the year $310,222.88 

Unexpended Appropriations for 1919-20 5,274.35 

Items included in Receipts to be refunded in 1919-20. . . 253.08 



5,527.43 



Total Expense $315,750.31 

Total Net Receipts 270,209.82 



Net Deficit $45,540.49 

1 Note — 60% of the cost of Maintenance of Grounds and 40% of Fire Protection is considered as academic, the 
balance as non-academic. 



42 The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly [April 

APPENDIX A 

Donations and Emergency Charge 
emergency charge 1918-19 

A special charge of $50.00 per student was established during 1917-18 to provide for increased expenses owing to 
ncreasing cost of wages and other expenses. 

For 1918-19 it was found necessary to increase the charge from $50.00 to $100.00 per student as the prices of mate- 
rials and rates of wages continued to rise. 

Below is given a table of comparison of costs of maintaining the Academic and Non-Academic Buildings during the 
years of 1914-15 and 1918-19. 

1914-15 1918-19 Increase 

Maintenance Academic Buildings $20,763.89 $34,570.03 $13,806.14 

Maintenances, Halls of Residence omitting Wages and Provisions 32,159.50 53,063.45 20,903.95 

Wages— Halls of Residence 28,399.05 41,985 .97 13,586.92 

Provisions— Halls of Residence 44,127.61 65,160.60 21,032.99 

Care of Grounds and Fire Protection 7,328.92 10,597.81 3,268.89 

$132,778.97 $205,377.86 $72,598.89 
The above represents the definite increase in Maintenance of Academic and Non-Academic buildings and grounds. 
Other items of Academic Supplies and Academic and Non-Academic expenses of printing and expenses of every 
kind were increased owing to the general rise in prices. 

DONATIONS FOR SCHOLARSHIPS 

Unexpended balances of donations given in previous years and brought forward from 1917-18. 

Composed of : Unexpended 

Expended Balance 

Donation from Mrs. Frank L. Wesson $500 .00 $500.00 

Anonymous donation for scholarship 400.00 400.00 

Anonymous per Marion Reilly, special scholarship 300.00 300.00 

From Mrs. Frederick W. Hallowell for one Robert G. Valentine Memorial 

scholarship 200.00 $200.00 

From the family of the late Charles S. Hinchman for the Charles S. Hinch- 

man Memorial Scholarship for 1918-19 500.00 500.00 

From Joseph C. Hoppin for special scholarship 25 .00 25 .00 

From Nancy J. Offutt for special scholarship 20.00 20.00 

Anonymous per Hilda Smith, special scholarship 200.00 200.00 

Anonymous per Dean Taf t, special scholarship 500 .00 500 .00 

$2,645.00 $1,445.00 $1,200.00 
Received during 1918-19: 
Scholarships. 

From Alumnae Association of Girls' High and Normal Schools, one scholar- 
ship $100.00 $100.00 

From the Board of Education of the City of Philadelphia , six scholarships . . . 600 . 00 600 . 00 

From Estate of Charles E. Ellis, four scholarships of $200.00 each 800.00 800.00 

From Mrs. Frederick W. Hallowell for Robert G. Valentine Memorial 

scholarship 200.00 $200.00 

From the family of the late Charles S. Hinchman for the Charles S. Hinch- 
man Memorial scholarship 500.00 500.00 

From Bryn Mawr School at Baltimore for the Bryn Mawr School Scholar- 
ship 500.00 500.00 

From Anne Hampton Todd for Special Scholarship 600 . 00 400 . 00 200 . 00 

Anonymous per Secretary, Special Scholarship 200.00 200.00 

From Bryn Mawr Club of Chicago 100.00 100.00 

From Mrs. J. Campbell Harris, for one Thos. H. Powers Memorial 

scholarship 400.00 200.00 200.00 

Anonymous English Scholarship 264.40 264.40 

From Alexander Simpson, Jr., for two special Frances Marion Simpson 

Memorial Scholarships 400.00 400.00 

From Nancy J. Offutt, balance on Special Scholarship 30 . 00 30 . 00 

From M. Carey Thomas, for Special Phebe Anna Thome Model School, 

Primary Scholarship 75 .00 75 .00 

From Dorothy W. Douglas for Special Scholarship 300 . 00 300 . 00 

From E. W. Garrison for Special Scholarship 25.00 25 .00 

$5,094.40 $3,730.00 $1,364.40 
$ 7,739.40 $5,175.00 <2,564.40 
OTHER DONATIONS 

[These donations represent only cash donations received at the college office. All other gifts may be found enu- 
merated under "Gifts" in the President's Report for 1918-19.] 
Unexpended balances of donations given in previous years and amounts expended of same during 1918-1919. 

Unexpended 

Balance Expended Balance 

From Justus C. Strawbridge for lantern for service door of Rockefeller Hall $3.14 $3.14 

From Elma Loines, Class of 1905, for Physical Laboratory Apparatus 18.75 18.75 

Balance of Donation from Marion Reilly for equipment Mathematical Depart- 
ment . 74 . 20 74 . 20 

From Cynthia M. Wesson, for gymnastic apparatus 365.00 365.00 

From Undergraduate Association for expenses of next May Day 15 .25 15 .25 

From Watson B. Dickermanfor purchase of Gazette des Beaux Arts 44.31 $44.31 

From Class 1904 for Books 144.35 96.26 48.09 

From Clement D. Houghton for Special Salaries 1918-19 500.00 500.00 

From Marion Reilly for Art Department 2.12 2 . 12 

$1,167.12 $640.57 $526.55 



1920] 



Annual Report of Alumnae Association 



43 



DONATIONS RECEIVED 1918-19 

Expended Balance 

From Robert Nichols for American Red Cross 50.00 $50.00 

From William C. Dennis for Essay on China and the Peace League 100.00 100.00 

From Ella Riegel for Department of Modern Art 100.00 100.00 

From Mary Converse for Prints 25.00 25.00 

From John I. Waterbury for Tablet 42.50 42.50 

From Joseph C. Hoppin for Department of Archaeology 6.22 6.22 

From Class 1905 for Tablet 120.00 120.00 

From E . White for Horace White Greek Literature Prize 50 . 00 50 . 00 

From Rebecca McD. Hickman for Books 75.00 42.20 32.80 

From Class 1908 for Books 10.00 10.00 

From Sale of Photographs for May Day 1 .00 1 .00 

$579.72 $410.92 $168.80 



PRESIDENT'S GIFT OF $5,000.00 FOR 1918-19 

A pproprialion 

For Gazette des Beaux Arts, Art Department $142 .91 

Books for Library for Professor Gray 21.86 

Maps for Professor Wheeler 41 . 56 

Tablets for Infirmary 465 .00 

For Conference 101 .44 

For Dictating Machine 305 .00 

For "Social Register," President's Office 35.00 

Works of Bernard Shaw and H. G. Wells for Infirmary 14.81 

Department of Archaeology 250.00 

Prizes on General Information 255 . 00 

Prizes on General Literature 215 .00 

Liberty Loan Expenses 2 1 . 00 

For Assistance to Students 158.85 

Refund of portion of Salary to Marion Parris Smith for year 1918-19 250.00 

Modern Art 150.00 

New Book Room 100.00 

Work on Photographs for the Art Department 5 .88 

Over Expenditure on Appropriations of Social Economics, year 1917-18 600 .00 

Setting up Art and placing Furniture donated by President Thomas 395 .74 

Cord of Wood for Library 14.45 

Typewriter for Dr. Sanders for Writing Faculty Minutes and General Faculty Busi- 
ness 60.00 

Elsie Sinclair Hodge Tablet. 105 .00 

Repairs to room L. Taylor Hall for use of Alumnae 364 .49 

Transportation Charge Picture loaned by Mr. Ehrich 12 .69 

Charges on Ivy sent to Penn College, Iowa 5 . 50 

Scholarship for R. Woodruff, amount advanced to be refunded from Shippen Fund 200.00 

Extra work Sodding and Re-Seeding Campus 482 . 50 

Chandelier put up in Library 487 . 86 

Salary of President's Secretary 1,086.98 

$6,348.52 

Unexpended balance of 1917-18 gift $800.10 

Gift for 1918-19 5,000.00 

Advanced on account of 1919-20 Gift 396.52 

Transferred from Mary Elizabeth Garrett Gift .13 



Unexpended 
Expended Balance 



$17.76 
41.56 
80.00 



12.45 



$142.91 
4.10 

385.00 
101.44 
305.00 

35.00 

14.81 
250.00 
255.00 
215.00 

21.00 
158.85 
250.00 
137.55 
100.00 
5.88 
600.00 
395.74 

14.45 

60.00 

105.00 

364.49 

12.69 

5.50 

200.00 

482.50 

487.86 

1,086.98 



$6,196.75 $151.77 



$6,196.75 



SPECIAL DONATIONS FOR ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS' SALARIES 

1918-1919 

Received Expended 

Justus Collins $50.00 $50.00 

Walton Clark 228.98 228.98 

Walter W. Pharo 100 .00 100.00 

W. R. Grim 228.98 228.98 

William E. Rhoads 50.00 50.00 

Marion R. Moseley 228.98 228.98 

Eliza M. Cope 50.00 50.00 

Elizabeth H. Sorchan 228.98 228.98 

Paul M. Warburg 500.00 500.00 

$1,665.92 $1,665.92 

SUMMARY OF UNEXPENDED BALANCES 

Donation Account 

Unexpended balance scholarships $2,564.40 

Unexpended balance of other Donations previous to 1918-19 526.55 

Unexpended balance Donations 1918-19 168.80 

$3,259.75 



44 The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly [April 

APPENDIX B 

Phebe Anna Thorne Model School 
operating account 

1918-1919 
Receipts: 

Income from Phebe Anna Thorne Fund received by Treasurer $6,718.40 

Other receipts by Comptroller: 

Tuition $11,850.00 

Luncheons paid for by pupils 1,200.00 

Books paid for by pupils 338.45 

Supplies paid for by pupils 208 . 79 

Pupils' Dress paid for by pupils 25 .00 

Interest on notes 5.11 

Receipts from sale of magazine 94.00 13,721 .35 

Total income $20,439 .75 

Expenditures: 

Salaries paid by Treasurer $14,088.90 

Salaries paid by Comptroller. . ._ $743 . 63 

Expenses of Director and Principal 65 .36 

Luncheons for pupils 4,125 .00 

Expense of Candidates for appointment 143 . 79 

Books for Library 67 .87 

Class Room Equipment 32 .68 

Class Room Books 298.55 

Class Room Supplies 328.42 

Laboratory for Physics. . . . 420. 10 

College Entrance Examination Fees and Expenses 69 . 10 

Rental of Piano 35 .00 

Health Examinations 25 .00 

Expense of Quarantine during Influenza Epidemic 176 .00 

Pupils' Dress 99.00 

Laundry 6 . 10 

Entertaining 3.10 

Office Expense 60 . 96 

Incidentals and Postage 134 . 70 

Telephone 67 . 75 

Publicity 249 . 06 

Publishing Pagoda Sketches 175 .00 

Garden Expense 30. 15 

Scholarship 100.00 

Rent of Dolgelly 1,300.00 

Heating and Electric Lighting 556 . 58 

Water Rent 45.64 

Gas 4.17 

Grounds 187.87 

Repairs 301 .33 

Furnishings 358.87 

Insurance 53 . 90 

Wages 688 . 14 10,952 .82 

Total Operating Expenses 25,041.72 

Deficit on operating for 1918-19 $4,601 .97 

CONSTRUCTION ACCOUNT 

1918-1919 

Accumulated deficit on Construction to September 30, 1918 $8,666 .40 

Expenses during 1918-19 on Construction of Out-of-Door Class Room No. 4 (Japanese Theatre — 

not completed) $5,614. 19 

Revenue stamp paid by Asa S. Wing, Treasurer 1 . 16 

$5,615.35 
Expended for erecting Cloak Room in Cartref for Primary Department (not completed) 219.36 5,834.71 



Deficit on Construction to September 30, 1919 $14,501 .11 

SUMMARY FOR MODEL SCHOOL DEBT 

Operating Account 

Surplus Deficit 

Surplus for year 1913-14 $80.36 

Deficit for year 1914-15 $753 .07 

Deficit for year 1915-16 2,810.82 

Surplus for year 1916-17 , 22 .01 

Surplus for year 1917-18 2,580.62 

Deficit for year 1918-19 4 ,601 .97 

$2,682.99 $8,165.86 

Total Deficit $8,165 . 86 

Less Surplus 2,682.99 

Net deficit on operating $5,482 .87 



1920] Annual Report of Aiumnae Association 45 

Construction Account 

Deficit 

Deficit for year 1913-14 , $39.65 

Deficit for year 1914-15 5,782.70 

Deficit for year 1915-16 2,525. 14 

Deficit for year 1916-17 207 .00 

Deficit for year 1917-18 1 1 1 . 85 

Deficit for year 1918-19 5,834 .71 



Total Deficit on Construction 14,501 . 1 1 



Total Deficit on Operating and Construction to September 30, 1919 $19,983 .98 

Of which President M. Carey Thomas has advanced for Construction of Building No. 4 5,727 .20 

Leaving actual debt of the Phebfi Anna Thorne Model School $14,256 . 78 

Cost of Tuition in Bryn Mawr College for the Year 1918-19 

(Method A) 
Total number of students, 483; of fohom 385 are undergraduates and 98 are graduates 

Academic Expenses of the College for the year as stated below: 

Teaching Salaries $126,222.88 

Academic Salaries (Non-Teaching) 17,782 .31 

Academic Salaries (60%) Executive 15,485 .60 

Other Academic Expenses 96,631 .51 

Total $256,122.30 

Cost per Graduate and Undergraduate Student 530.27 

Cost per Graduate Student 584.76 

Cost per Undergraduate Student 516.40 

The first calculation shows the cost per student without distinction between Graduate and Undergraduate. 

The second calculation shows only the actual cost of hours of teaching each graduate student. 

It is assumed that the complete plant and organization of the College would be required if only Undergraduates were 
admitted. 

The calculation is as follows: 

Teaching Salaries $40,847 . 18 

Fellowships 8,500.00 

Graduate Scholarships 3,929 .00 

Foreign Scholarships 2,430.00 

Cost of extra Printing, etc. (Estimate) 1,600.00 

Total $57,306. 18 

Cost per Graduate Student $584 . 76 

The third calculation is obtained by deducting the cost as stated above. It shows the cost of 385 Undergraduates is 
$198,816.12 or: 

• Cost per Undergraduate Student $516 . 40 

(Method B) 

Students in Bryn Mawr College in year 1918-19, 483; graduate students, 98; 
undergraduate students, 385 

CALCULATION 

100% 67ft% 32&% 

Total Undergraduate Graduate 

Number of Students 483 385 98 

Teaching Salaries $126,222 .88 $85,375 . 70 $40,847 . 18 

Academic Salaries (non-teaching) 17,782.31 12,020.84 5,761.47 

Academic Salaries (60% administrative and executive) 15,485 .60 10,468 .27 5,017 .33 

Academic Expenses 96,631 .51 65,322.90 31,308.61 

Total $256,122 .30 $173,187 .71 $82,934.59 

Cost per Student 530.27 449.84 846.27 

Cost per Graduate Student — Tuition only, $846.27 

Teaching Salaries $40,847 . 18 $416 .81 

Academic Salaries (non -teaching) 5,761.47 58.79 

Academic Salaries Administrative 5,017 .33 51 .20 

Academic Expenses 31,308.61 319.47 

$82,934.59 $846.27 
Cost per Undergraduate Student — Tuition only, $449.84 

Teaching Salaries $85,375 . 70 $221 .76 

Academic Salaries (non-teaching) 12,020.84 31.22 

Academic Salaries (administrative) 10,468.27 27.19 

Academic Expenses 65,322 .90 169.67 

$173,187.71 $449.84 



46 The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly [April 

EXPLANATION OF METHOD B OF CALCULATION 

Charged to tuition are all purely teaching salaries = $126,222.88; subdivided on hourly basis between graduates 
and undergraduates: Cost of graduate hours of teaching, $40,847.18, or 32 T % per cent of total teaching salaries, cost of 
undergraduate hours of teaching, $85,375.70, or 67^ per cent of total teaching salaries. 

Charged to tuition are all non-teaching academic salaries, including salaries of Dean of College and Dean's secretary, 
librarian and library assistants , Director and Assistant Director and stenographer of department of gymnastics and athletics , 
laboratory student assistants, student messengers, student proctors, stenographer to Carola Woerishoffer Department 
=$17,782.31. The cost of non-teaching academic salaries is subdivided between graduate and undergraduate cost of 
tuition according to the cost of the proportion of hours of teaching given to graduate and undergra duate students; that is, 
32^j per cent, of the total of $17,782.31 is charged to graduate cost of tuition = $5,761.47 and 67 T fi u per cent is charged 
to undergraduate cost of tuition =$12,020.84. 

Charged to tuition as academic salaries is 60 per cent, of the total administrative and executive salaries of the Presi- 
dent of the College, Recording Dean, Comptroller, Business Manager and. the assistants and stenographers of the same 
=$15,485.60. The remaining 40 per cent of these salaries =$10,323.72 is charged to non-academic administration. The 
above amount of $15,485.60 is subdivided between graduate and undergraduate cost of tuition according to the cost of the 
proportion of hours of teaching given to graduate and undergraduate students; that is, 32 T % per cent of the total of $1 5 ,485 .60 
is charged to graduate cost of tuition =$5,017.33 and 67 T %per cent is charged to udergraduate cost of tuition =10,468.27. 

Charged to tuition are all costs of maintenance of purely academic buildings (including Taylor Hall, Dal ton Hall 
Library, Gymnasium, Advanced Psychological Laboratory and first floor of Cartref Cottage), running expenses of all 
laboratories, running expenses of library and purchase of books, scholarships, class room supplies, lectures, entertainments 
religious services, net cost of printing of calendar and register, all subscriptions to educational committees and other purely 
academic expenses, including the treasurer's expenses caring for endowment. Cost of maintenance of grounds, office ex- 
penses and telephones are divided between academic expenses and non-academic expenses in the proportion of 60 per cent 
academic and 40 per cent non-academic. Total academic expenses =$96,631.51, which amount is subdivided between 
graduate and undergraduate cost of tuition according to the cost of the hours of teaching; that is, 32-/o per cent of the 
total (=$31,308.61) is charged to cost of graduate tuition and 67 T 6 o per cent (=$65,322.90) is charged to cost of 
undergraduate tuition. 

No interest on capital invested in grounds, academic buildings and equipment, and no depreciation of same, are 
included in the above calculation. The cost of tuition represents only the actual cash expenditure of the year in question. 
No permanent improvements to the academic plant made during the year have been included, as these are not regarded 
as properly belonging to the teaching of any given year, although they are made solely for the benefit of instructors and 
students. 

AUDITOR'S REPORT 

8th January, 1920 
We have audited the accounts of both the Treasurer and Comptroller of Bryn Mawr College for the fiscal year ended 
30th September, 1919, and found them to be correct, and we hereby certify that the receipts and expenditures of the Col- 
lege for the year contained in this Financial Report are properly stated from the books of the Treasurer and Comptroller. 

Lybrand, Ross Brothers and Montgomery, 
Accountants and Auditors. 

ANNUAL REPORT OF TREASURER OF BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE 

ASSOCIATION 

February 13, 1920 

Miss Bertha S. Ehlers, Treasurer, 

The Alumnae Association of Bryn Mawr College, 
Bryn Mawr, Pa. 
Dear Madam: 

We have audited the accounts of The Alumnae Association of Bryn Mawr College for 
the year ended 31st December, 1919, and have found them to be correct. 

Our work included the examination of the securities on hand, the confirmation of 
securities in the hands of your fiscal agents and of cash on deposit at banks, and the verifi- 
cation of the income from investments. 

Loans to Students: We have been informed that students are granted five years after 
graduation within which to repay loans. In our examination we noticed a number of loans 
that on account of their age may be overdue, and which should probably receive considera- 
tion either as to collection or eliminating them from the Loans Account by charging them 
against the Loan Fund. These loans which were made prior to 1914 and are uncollected at 
31st December, 1919, total $2,320. 

We also noticed that interest has not been received on a number of loans. 
Annexed we submit the following statements: 
Balance Sheet, 31st December, 1919 
Endowment Fund Receipts and Disbursements, for the year ended 31st December, 

1919 
Loan Fund Receipts and Disbursements, for the year ended 31st December, 1919 
Alumnae Fund Receipts and Disbursements for the year ended 31st December, 1919 
Service Corps Fund Receipts and Disbursements for the year ended 31st December, 
1919 



1920] Annual Report of Alumnae Association 47 

General Treasury Expense Account Receipts and Disbursements for the year 
ended 31st December, 1919 

Quarterly Account Receipts and Disbursements for the year ended 31st December, 
1919 

Securities Owned, 31st December, 1919, at Book Values. Alumnae Academic 
Endowment Fund Cumulating — Victory Chair French 

Securities Owned, 31st December, 1919, at Book Values. Mary E. Garrett En- 
dowment Fund 

Securities Owned, 31st December, 1919, at Book Values. Alumnae Fund. 
Very truly yours, 

Lybrand, Ross Bros. & Montgomery. 

BALANCE SHEET, 31st DECEMBER, 1919 

ASSETS 
Endowment Fund Assets: 

Cash Uninvested $2,557.92 

Investments at book values as annexed: 

Mary E. Garrett Endowment Fund $99,988.36 

Alumnae Academic Endowment Fund Cumu- 
lating— Victory Chair French 53,597.63 153,585.99 

$156,143.91 
Loan Fund Assets: 

Loans to Students $10,010.00 

Cash 1 ,893 . 63 



Alumnae Fund Assets: 

Investments at Cost, as annexed $5,813 .48 

Cash 1,018.67 



11,903.63 



6,832.15 



Service Corps Fund Assets: 

Cash 15,108.53 






$189,988.22 

LIABILITIES 

Endowment Fund: 

Balance, January 1, 1919 $108,463.79 

Contributions and Subscriptions during year $48,479.89 

Income from Investments $6,067 . 29 

Less: 

Endowment Fund Ex- 
penses $961.15 

Payments on Account 
M. E. Garrett En- 
dowment Fund In- 
come 4,340.52 5,301.67 765.62 



49,245.51 

$157,709.30 
Less. Impairment of Fund on account of General Expenses 

of Association 2,136.83 

$155,572.47 



48 The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly [April 

Loan Fund: 

Balance, January 1, 1919 $11,705.12 

Interest received during year 198.51 



$11,903.63 



Alumnae Fund: 
Principal: 

Balance, January 1, 1919 $3,994.86 

Life Memberships received during year 460.00 4,454.86 

Interest: 

Balance, January 1, 1919 $2,094.83 

Net Income during year 282.46 2,377.29 



6,832.15 
Service Corps Fund: 

Balance, January 1, 1919 10,565 .29 

Donations received during year $8,050.48 

Income during year 304.76 



8,355.24 
Less. Payments for Support of Workers 3,812.00 4,543.24 



15,108.53 
Accounts Payable from General Treasury Fund 571 .44 

$189,988.22 
ENDOWMENT FUND 

For the Year Ended 31st December, 1919 

Balance, January 1, 1919 $2,238.16 

Receipts 

Cash Donations $25,183.57 

Investments Matured: 

$1,000-Baltimore & Ohio R.R. 4£s $1,000.00 

1 ,000-Choctaw, Oklahoma & Gulf R.R. 
5s 1,000.00 2,000.00 

Income from Investments 5,999.17 

Interest on Bank Deposits 237 .30 

$33,420.04 
Securities Donated: 

U. S. First Liberty Loan 3£s $350.00 

U. S. First Liberty Loan Conv. 4s 150.00 

U. S. First Liberty Loan Conv. 4|s 100.00 

U. S. Second Liberty Loan 4s 600.00 

U. S. Second Liberty Loan Conv. 4|s 2,000.00 

U. S. Third Liberty Loan 4|s 3,500.00 

U. S. Fourth Liberty Loan 4£s 4,050.00 

U. S. Victory Liberty Loan 4fs 12,300.00 

U. S. War Savings Stamps Series 1918 204.72 

U. S. War Savings Stamps Series 1919 41 .60 

23,296.32 

56,716.36 

$58,954.52 



1920] Annual Report of Alumnae Association 

Disbursements 
Investments Purchased: 

$14,000 U. S. Fourth Liberty Loan 4|s $13,159.25 

8,000 U. S. Victory Liberty Loan 4fs 8,000.00 

5,000 Dominion of Canada 5|s 4,862.50 

$26,021.75 

Accrued interest on Bonds Purchased 202 .47 

Commission to Fiscal Agent 116.21 

Interest paid to Fiscal Agent 15.71 

Expenses, Finance Committee 295 .40 

Expenses, Finance Committee — Victory Chair Drive 542 .66 

Thrift Stamps converted into War Savings Stamp .17 

Payments to Asa Wing, Account of Mary E. Garrett Endow- 
ment Fund Income . 4,340 . 52 

$31,534.89 

Donated Securities delivered to Fiscal Agent $21,996.32 

Donated Securities on hand, December 31, 1919.. 1,300.00 23,296.32 

54,831.21 
Transferred to General Treasury Fund 1,565 .39 

Balance in banks and on hand December 31, 1919: 

Fidelity Trust Co $1,279.32 

Penna. Co. for Insurances on Lives and Granting Annuities, 

Expense Account 125 .37 

Penna. Co. for Insurances on Lives and Granting Annuities, 

Trust Fund 407.48 

Cash on Hand 745 . 75 



49 



56,396.60 



$2,557.92 



$2,557.92 



LOAN FUND 

For the Year Ended 31st December, 1919 

Balance, January 1, 1919 

Receipts 

Repayment of loans by students 

Interest on Loans 

Interest on Bank Balances 

Disbursements 
Loans to Students 

Balance, Cash in Bank, December 31, 1919 



$2,160.12 



$980.00 

152.38 
46.13 






1.178.51 




$3,338.63 
1,445.00 



$1,893.63 



50 The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly [April 

ALUMNAE FUND 

For the Year Ended 31st December, 1919 

Balance, January 1, 1919 $236.03 

Receipts 

Life Memberships $460.00 

Income from Investments 308.63 

Interest on Bank Deposits 20.18 

788.81 

$1,024.84 
Disbursements 

Commission to Fiscal Agent for collecting income 6.17 

$1,018.67 
Balance, December 31, 1919: 

In Bank $958.67 

On hand 60.00 

$1,018.67 
SERVICE CORPS FUND 

For the Year Ended 31st December, 1919 

Balance, January 1, 1919 $10,565 .29 

Receipts 

Donations $8,050.48 

Interest on Bank Deposits 304.76 

8,355.24 

$18,920.53 
Disbursements 
Payments for support of Service Corps Workers $3,812 .00 

$15,108.53 
Balance in banks, December 31, 1919: 

Bryn Mawr Trust Co $8,021 .03 

Bryn Mawr Trust Co. Savings Account 7,087 .50 

$15,108.53 

GENERAL TREASURY-EXPENSE ACCOUNT 

For the Year Ended 31st December, 1919 

Balance, January 1, 1919 $86.00 

Receipts 

Dues $2,440.69 

Alumnae Supper 741 . 50 

$3,182.19 

Transferred from Endowment Fund Income 1,565.39 

_ 4,747.58 

$4,833.58 



1920] Annual Report of Alumnae Association 51 

Disbursements 

Printing $150. 15 

Postage and Stationery 555 .42 

Traveling Expenses 148 .27 

Academic Committee Expenses 271 .31 

Athletic Committee Expenses 9.08 

Typewriting and Clerical Services 175.12 

Committee on Exhibits Expenses 34.42 

Alumnae Supper Expenses 413 .00 

Alumnae Reception Expenses 36.90 

Alumnae Garden Party to Seniors 53 . 60 

Alumnae College Breakfast 360.00 

Miscellaneous Expenses 612.27 

Salary Executive Secretary 762.79 

Quarterly Account Expenses: 

Balance 1918 Expenses $278 .91 

Current Bills 1919 972 .34 



1,251.25 



"QUARTERLY" ACCOUNT 

For the Year Ended 31st December, 1919 

Receipts 

Advertising $295 . 50 

Subscriptions and Sales 21 .25 



Balance, Transferred from General Treasury Expense 

Account 972 . 34 



$4,833.58 



$316.75 



$1,289.09 



Disbursements 

Printing $916.58 

Salaries 316.99 

Addressing Machine purchased 47 . 50 

Miscellaneous 8 .02 

$1,289.09 

SECURITIES OWNED, 31ST DECEMBER, 1919, AT BOOK VALUES 
Alumnae Academic Endowment Fund Cumulating — Victory Chair French 

$500 U. S. First Liberty 3£s $500.00 

300 U. S. First Liberty Conv. 4|s 300.00 

650 U. S. Second Liberty 4s 650.00 

2,050 U. S. Second Liberty Conv. 41s 2,050.00 

5,300 U. S. Third' Liberty 4|s 5,300.00 

18,950 U. S. Fourth Liberty 4|s 18,109.25 

20,300 U. S. Victory Liberty 4f s 20,300.00 

5,000 Dominion of Canada 10 yr. 5|s 4,862 .50 

590 U. S. War Savings Stamps Series 1918 499.78 

50 U. S. War Savings Stamps Series 1919 41.60 

2 U. S. Thrift Stamps 2.00 

1,000 Lehigh Valley R.R. Coll. Tr. 6s 982.50 

$53,597.63 



52 The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly [April 

Mary E. Garrett Endowment Fund 

$6,000 Atlantic City Ry. Mtge. 5s $5,873.50 

1,000 Baltimore & Ohio Equip. Trusts Series "E" 4|s 979.22 

5,500 Baltimore & Ohio Prior Lien 3|s 5,047.50 

4,000 Bethlehem Steel First Mortgage 5s 4,000.00 

5,000 Bryn Mawr College Inn Assn. 2nd Mtge. 5s 5,000.00 

1,000 Central District Tel. First Mtge. 5s 920.00 

2,000 Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul 4s. 1,880.00 

5,000 Chicago Rwy. Co. First Mtge. 5s. 5,018.75 

5,000 Colorado Springs Electric Co. First Mtge. 5s 4,950.00 

5,000 Erie RR. Equip. Tr. Series U 5s 4,984.50 

1,000 Georgia Rwy. Electric Co. First Cons. Mtge. 5s 990.00 

5,000 Lake Shore & Michigan Southern 4s 4,622.50 

4,000 Lansing Fuel & Gas Co. Cons. Mtge. 5s 3,910.00 

2,000 Lehigh Valley Ry. 4§s 2,000.00 

5,000 Lehigh & Wilkes Barre Coal Co. Cons. Mtge. 4s ; . 4,700.00 

2,000 New York Central Hudson River Deb. 4s " . 1,802.50 

2,000 New York & Erie RR. Mtge. 5s 2,000.00 

2,000 New York & Erie RR. 4|s 1,952.22 

5,000 Northern Pacific, Great Northern C. B. & Q. Coll. 4s 4,806.25 

3,000 Penna. Co. Mtge. 4£s 2,955.00 

4,000 Phila., Baltimore & Washington RR. Series "J" 4s 3,780.00 

1,000 Philadelphia Rapid Transit Equip. Trust 5s 992 .40 

1,000 Philadelphia & Suburban Gas & Electric Co. First & Refunding 5s. . . . 1,000.00 

5,000 Portland Rwy. Co. First & Ref. Mtge. 5s 5,000.00 

1,000 Reading Co. Equip. 4|s 960.90 

2,000 Schuylkill River East Side Rwy. First Mtge. 4s. 1,975.00 

1,000 Southern Pacific Equip. Trust Series "A" 4£s. . . 973.32 

2,000 South Carolina & Georgia Ry. First Mtge. 5s 1,990.00 

5,600 U. S. Second Liberty Conv. 41s 5,600.00 

9,200 U. S. Third Liberty 4±s 9,200.00 

150 U. S. War Savings Stamps 124.80 

$99,988.39 
Alumnae Fund 

$2,500 U. S. Fourth Liberty 4|s $2,500.00 

41 Shs. Lehigh Coal & Navigation Co. par $50.00 3,313.48 



$5,813.48 



REPORT OF THE JAMES E. RHOADS SCHOLARSHIP COMMITTEE 

For the year 1919-20 ten candidates applied Scholarship, Beatrice N. Spinelli of Philadelphia 

for the James E. Rhoads Junior Scholarship with an average grade of 84.58, and for the 

and five for the Sophomore Scholarship, and in Sophomore Scholarship, Lillian Wyckoff of 

the case of both scholarships the claims of the Connecticut with a grade of 81.85. 
candidates from the point of view alike of need These recommendations were made and 

and of scholarship were unusually difficult to approved at the twenty-fourth annual meeting 

balance. After holding interviews individually of the James E. Rhoads Scholarship committee 

with all the candidates and consulting with in the President's office, Taylor Hall, on the 

the members of the Faculty with whom they afternoon of April 15, at which were present on 

were working as to their academic ability and behalf of the Faculty, President Thomas, 

promise, the alumnae members of the com- Professor Arthur L. Wheeler and Professor 

mittee decided to recommend for the Junior Schenck; on behalf of the Alumnae Association, 



1920] 



Annual Report of Alumnae Association 



53 



Mrs. William Roy Smith, chairman, Miss 
Emily G. Noyes, and Miss L. M. Donnelly. 
By request Dean Taft met with the committee. 
The chairman reported that the Alumnae 
Association was taking up the matter of increas- 
ing the James E. Rhoads Scholarships by fifty 
dollars each in proportion to the increase in 
College fees, as requested at the meeting of 
1918. She also stated that gifts had been 
made bv two members of the Alumnae Associa- 



tion of a special scholarship of $200 and of the 
sum of $300 to be distributed in scholarships 
according to the judgment of the committee. 

After the conclusion of the business of the 
James E. Rhoads Scholarships committee the 
alumnae members were requested to assist the 
Faculty committee in the award of the other 
undergraduate scholarships. 

Respectfully submitted 

Lucy Martin Donnelly, 

Secretary. 



CAROLA WOERISHOFFER MEMORIAL FUND REPORT 



The committee has again awarded the annual 
income of the fund, one hundred dollars, to 
the National Women's Trade Union League, to 
be applied towards the expense of a scholar- 
ship for a New York girl at the League's Training 
School for Active Workers in the Labor Move- 



ment. This seems to us the best disposition of 
the small sum at our command that we have 
so far been able to devise. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Margaret Franklin, 

Chairman. 



REPORT OF LOAN FUND COMMITTEE 



The Loan Fund Committee presents the 
following report: 

To balance January 1, 1919 $2,160. 12 

To payments on loans (9) 980 . 00 

To interest on loans (24) 152 . 38 

$3,292.50 

By loans made to 8 students. . . . $1,445.00 

December 31, 1919, balance.. . $1,847.50 

The fund in use now amounts to somewhat 
over $10,000 and is divided among forty- three 



alumnae and students (4 of these students 
have had loans to assist them while doing 
graduate work). The committee asks for the 
continued interest of alumnae and friends to 
increase the fund. The limit of loan to $500.00 
to any one student has been exceeded by vote 
of the committee in several instances owing to 
the increased college expenses. 
On behalf of the Committee 

Martha G. Thomas, 

Secretary. 



REPORT OF ATHLETIC COMMITTEE 



The record of alumnae athletics has been 
rather brighter than usual this year. The very 
large number of alumnae present at reunions 
last June made it easy to find good material 
in every line except water polo. A team in 
that violent sport was with much difficulty 
pressed into service, and went down to over- 
whelming defeat (12 to 0) at the hands of the 
Varsity. The line-up follows: M . Willard, 
'17; M. Branson, '16; P. Turle, '18; C. Stevens, 
'17; H. Hobbs, '18; M. O'Connor, '18; A. 
Hawkins, '07, and M. Stair, '18; the last two 
each playing one half. 

In tennis, however, the alumnae covered 
themselves with glory by winning three out of 
five matches from the Varsity. 

M. Thompson, '17, lost to Z. Boynton, '20, 
10-8, 6-2. 



M. Stair, '18, lost to H. James, '21, 6-2, 6-2. 

A. M. Hawkins, '07, won from K. Cauldwell, 
'20, 6-3, 3-6 and 6-2. 

I. Smith, '15, won from F. Robbins, '22, 
6-8, 9-7, 6-3. 

C. Stevens, '17, won from A. Thorndike, '19, 
6-3, 6-4. 

A very exciting basket ball game resulted in 
a varsity victory by the close score of 10-8. 
As usual team work was lacking on the side of 
the alumnae, though good work was done by 
all the players. The team was made up of C. 
Stevens' 17, H. Kirk, '14; H. Harris, '17; M. 
Branson, '16, and M. Thompson, '17, with H. 
Carey, '14, as substitute. 

On November 22, 1919, the Varsity defeated 
the alumnae 2-1 in a thrilling hockey game. It 
took the alumnae about ten minutes to settle 



54 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[April 



down and during that time two goals were 
scored against them, but after that their defen- 
sive was impregnable and E. Biddle scored 
from the edge of the circle. The line-up 
follows: H. Kirk, '14; C. Dowd, '16; M. Kirk, 
'10; A. Hawkins, '07; J. Katzenstein, '07; M. 
Branson, '16; E. Biddle, '19; H. Harris, '17; 



C. Wesson, '09; M. Bacon, '18; H. Smith, '10, 
and A. Newlin, '18, as substitute goal. 

On the whole the season has been very suc- 
cessful. 

Respectfully submitted 

Alice M. Hawklns, '07, 
for M. Dessau. '13. 



REPORT OF A. C. A. CONVENTION 



The Biennial Convention of the Association 
of Collegiate Alumnae was held in St. Louis 
from March 31 to April 3, 1919. 

As Marion Reilly, '01, was chairman of a 
standing committee, it was decided to send the 
president of the Alumnae Association as an 
additional counsellor. The other members of 
the Bryn Mawr delegation were: Elizabeth B. 
Kirkbride, '96; Anna B. Lawther, '97; Edna 
Fischel Gellhorn, '00; Margaret Nichols Har- 
denbergh, '05; Leone Robinson Morgan, '09; 
Jessie Gilroy Hall, '09; Maud W. Holmes, '13; 
Harriet S. Sheldon, '14; Betsy B. B. Bensburg, 
'16; Irene Loeb, '19. Harriet Sheldon acted 
as secretary of the delegation. The other 
Bryn Mawr people present at the convention 
were: Dr. Martha Tracy, '98, who spoke at the 
opening meeting of the convention on the 
Public Health Service, and Professor Susan 
M. Kingsbury, who spoke on Industrial Super- 
vision. 

Besides the general meetings there were 
section conferences. Elizabeth Kirkbride, 



Marion Reilly and Martha Tracy attended the 
conference of Women Trustees and Deans. 
The other members of the delegation attended 
the conference of the Affiliated Alumnae Asso- 
ciations. At the luncheon on the Conference 
Day, Marion Reilly, '01, acted as Toastmistress 
and Edna Fischel Gellhorn, '00, president of 
the Missouri State Equal Suffrage League, 
responded to a toast. The Conference of 
Affiliated Alumnae Associations discussed the 
questions of local organizations, clubs and 
dues. The Bryn Mawr delegates were pleased 
to find that a much larger proportion of their 
graduates and former students were members 
of the Alumnae Association than of any other 
college. 

The final meeting of the Conference was a 
dinner at which Dean Gildersleeve of Barnard 
presided, and the Conference broke up with a 
sense of large national contacts. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Louise Congdon Francis. 



QUARTERLY REPORT 



The cost of the Alumnae Quarterly has 
been much questioned this year. The directors 
of the Association have discussed it and advised 
that the advertising be put in the hands of an 
agency. This was done last July when the 
intercollegiate alumnae publications organized 
under Roy Barnhill Inc., for the purpose of 
obtaining national advertisements. The Quar- 
terly has received a full page from the General 
Electric Company, through this agent. 

The Quarterly is published under unique 
arrangements. It is sold at $1 a year, $0.25 a 
copy which is not a high price. Several years 
ago the dues of the Alumnae Association 
were raised from $1 to $1.50 and the Quarterly 
was included. This was done under the under- 
standing that the members were to receive the 
Quarterly at cost price which it was esti- 
mated then would be $0.50 a year. If this 



were really the cost price the Quarterly 
before that would have been making 100 per 
cent profit with advertising receipts additional. 
In the year 1919 the cost of the Quarterly 
was about $1500. The receipts from advertis- 
ing and sale of single copies were $310. This 
makes the cost price total $1200. The circula- 
tion for the year averaged 1700 copies which 
shows an average cost to the members of $0.75 
a year. Twenty-five cents represents the 
increase in cost since 1912. The dues for the 
Alumnae Association on the other hand were 
raised to $2.00 in January, 1920, so that now 
it may be that one-half of the increase is sup- 
posed to go to cover the increased cost of the 
Quarterly which would bring the receipts for 
circulation up to the necessary $0.75, the 
present cost price. 



1920J 



Reports from Bryn Mawr Clubs 



55 



Recent increases in the cost of printing seem 
to indicate that there will be an alarming 
deficit next year unless the advertising rates are 
increased. Increased advertising rates have 
been very general and frequent in other pub- 
lications within the last five years, whereas 
there has been no change in the Quarterly 
prices. It seems advisable to increase the rates 
33% per cent. They are at present: 

One page for year $100 one issue $25 . 00 

One J page for year 50 one issue 12.50 

One I page for year 25 one issue 6.00 

One | page for year 12 one issue 3 .00 

The proposed rates are: 

One page for year $130 one issue $35 .00 
One | page for year 65 one issue 20 . 00 



One \ page for year 30 one issue 8 . 00 
One | page for year 15 one issue 4.00 
These new rates will go into effect the first of 
March, if no objection is found. 

Less reading matter but more interesting 
material has been the policy of the editor of 
the Quarterly in the last half year. Pictures 
have been used more frequently. Long letters 
and reports have been omitted. The April 
number of course will not follow this general 
line because all the annual reports and the 
by-laws will have to be printed in it according 
to the constitution but for the rest if the new 
policy meets approval it will be continued 
through 1920. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Isabel Foster. 



CONFERENCE COMMITTEE REPORT 



A meeting of the Conference Committee was 
held at the College in January. A number of 
interesting questions were discussed; most 
important of these the problem of an honor 
system in examinations. The students feel 
that it is inconsistent and humiliating for 
Bryn Mawr which so greatly prides itself upon 
its self government to be under a proctor sys- 
tem in examinations. The present exercise 
regulations were also discussed, especially the 
ruling with regard to walking, which at present 
is limiting the opportunity for indulgence in 
this form of recreation. 



In accordance with a suggestion of the Aca- 
demic Committee, a member of the Academic 
Committee was this year appointed to serve on 
the Conference Committee. It was therefore 
possible to refer these undergraduate problems 
directly to the Academic Committee which was 
much interested in them. It is hoped that this 
closer connection between the two committees 
may afford both groups a valuable channel of 
communication. 

Eleanor F. Riesman, '03 
Chairman. 



REPORTS FROM BRYN MAWR CLUBS 



BALTIMORE 

The Baltimore Club meets once a month at 
the homes of the members and has not done 
anything so far to report. The officers are: 
President, Olga Kelly; Treasurer, Laura Fowler; 
and Secretary, Mallory Webster. 

BOSTON 

During the last year the regular monthly 
meetings of the Bryn Mawr Club of Boston 
have been held at the College Club, 40 Com- 
monwealth Avenue. Nineteen new members 
have joined the club and life memberships have 
been established with two life members already 
registered. The club has made contributions 
towards the work of Dennison House, the 
Association of Collegiate Alumnae and the 
Women's Educational and Industrial Union 
and has given two Liberty bonds for the Vic- 



tory Chair of French at Bryn Mawr. Lately 
the monthly teas have been made more inter- 
esting by having speakers. Constance Kellen 
Branham '16 told about her canteen work in 
France. Professor Frankfurter of Harvard 
sboke on "Industrial Unrest" and Mr. John 
Richardson and Miss Ellen Emerson spoke 
about the Harvard and Smith campaigns, 
offering valuable suggestions. 

Early in December a luncheon was given at 
which Acting President Taft, the guest of 
honor, told about the Bryn Mawr Endowment 
Fund. During the afternoon prospective Bryn 
Mawr students were invited to hear her speak 
about the college. Dr. Leuba presented the 
great need for the Endowment Fund at a 
special meeting of the Club on December 29th 
and Mrs. Slade came from New York to attend 
another special meeting held at Elizabeth 



56 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[April 



Higginson Jackson's house on January 5th and 
to start the campaign in New England. Mar- 
garet Blaine accepted the chairmanship. Plans 
are now being made for the local organization, 
headquarters are being opened at 367 Boylston 
street, Boston, and local teams are working. 
Respectfully submitted, 

Anna D. Fry, 

Secretary. 

CHICAGO 

The Club began a year ago to meet every 
Friday noon for luncheon at Marshall Field's. 
The attendance varied — some Fridays proved 
delightful — but on the whole it was too much 
of an effort for those who made a point of 
coming every week. Chicago is a very busy 
city and the Bryn Mawr alumnae are busy 
citizens interested in many philanthropies and 
arts — and there are a large group of home- 
makers who are redecorating or taking care of 
the baby while the nurse goes out. The 
weekly meetings were too frequent to sustain 
enthusiasm. 

During the summer there were no meetings 
as there were scarcely any members in the city 
and no important reason for calling in the 
suburbanites. 

In the Spring the Club gave a benefit with 
the Alliance Francaise for the Bryn Mawr 
Chair of French. Under the auspices of the 
French Consul of Chicago, the French Club 
and various patronesses, the Club brought 
Monsieur Copeau to Chicago to speak about 
his theater and his talk was followed by a 
French play. 

During the summer the secretary, Jeannette 
Ridlon, was married and went to Switzerland 
to live. Harriot Houghteling was appointed to 
take her place. When, in the autumn, a real 
finance committee was organized of members 
eager to serve, Harriot Houghteling found 
herself not only secretary and treasurer of 
the Club but also secretary and bond receiver 
for the finance committee and at the president's 
departure she became automatically president 
pro-tem. 

There were meetings of Bryn Mawr women 
during the autumn and winter but they were 
meetings called by the finance committee, not 
by the Club, as it seemed wiser to give the 
finance committee free scope for its campaign 
and not dull enthusiasm for its meetings by 
having Club gatherings much less important in 
themselves. 



INDIANA 

The Bryn Mawr Club of Indiana was organ- 
ized January 21, 1920, at the home of Sarah 
Atkins Kackley, 1312 N. Meridian Street, 
Indianapolis. The following alumnae, former 
and graduate students were present: Sarah 
Frances Atkins Kackley, '94 (Mrs. Thomas R. 
Kackley); Eliza Adams Lewis, '93 (Mrs. 
Frank N. Lewis); Elizabeth Nichols Moores, 
'93 (Mrs. Charles W. Moores); Ethel Bennett 
Hitchins, '05 (Mrs. Arthur P. Hitchins); 
Bertha Seely Dunlop, '05 (Mrs. George Q. 
Dunlop); Julia Haines MacDonald, '12 (Mrs. 
John A. MacDonald); Elizabeth Holliday 
Hitz, '16 (Mrs. Benjamin Hitz); Katherine 
Holliday Daniels, '18 (Mrs. Joseph Daniels); 
Emily Moores, '19; Elizabeth Hench, '95; 
Ella Mallott Evans, '96; Elizabeth Hollo way, 
'20; Amelia Sanborn, '19; and Florence Henly 
Hadley, graduate '99-'00. 

Officers were elected for the Indiana Club as 
follows: President, Mrs. Frank N. Lewis, '93; 
vice-president and treasurer, Mrs. Charles W. 
Moores, '93; secretary, Mrs. John A. Mac- 
Donald, '12. Katherine Sergeant Angell, '14 
(Mrs. Ernest Angell) of New York was present 
and presented the plans for the Two Million 
Endowment. She stated that Mrs. Lewis has 
consented to act as the state chairman for 
Indiana, Mrs. Benjamin Hitz as the chairman 
for Indianapolis and Mrs. MacDonald as the 
Indiana publicity chairman. 

The Club has taken the raising of the Indiana 
quota as its first objective and plans are being 
carried forward enthusiastically for the drive. 
J. H. MacDonald, '12, 

Secretary. 

NEW YORK 

During the last year the club has been used 
more than ever before. The restaurant is 
very popular, the rooms are practically always 
full, and many applications for rooms have to 
be refused. Besides five residents 307 people 
have stayed at the Club. Of this number 139 
were members, and 168 were guests. 

To make the club library more worthy of 
Bryn Mawr standards a library committee has 
been formed, which during the year has pur- 
chased seventy-eight new books. The policy 
is to get for the most part modern books, and 
to supplement them gradually by older ones. 
The books have been much appreciated. 

The club is indebted to the Entertainment 
Committee for many enjoyable meetings. The 



[1920 



Reports from Bryn Mawr Clubs 



57 



following have been guests of the club, and 
have made the dinner and regular' monthly 
luncheons very interesting by their speeches: 
President M. Carey Thomas, Miss Susan M. 
Kingsbury, Miss Dorothea de F. Baldwin '13, 
Miss Angela Morgan, Robert E. Bruere, Henry 
S. Beard, Walter Hampden, Hon. James W. 
Gerard, F. W. Pethick Lawrence of London, 
and Louis F. de Foe. 

Whenever possible the club cooperates with 
the Endowment Campaign Committee. 

NORTHERN CALIFORNIA 

Preliminary to the formal organization of the 
Bryn Mawr Club of Northern California, 
fifteen alumnae and former students met in 
September 1919 with Dr. and Mrs. William 
Roy Smith (Marion Parris Smith, '01) who 
were then in San Francisco on their way to the 
Orient. Dr. and Mrs. Smith were able to tell 
those present many things about the College 
and to rouse considerable interest in the En- 
dowment Fund Campaign. 

On November 24th, 1919, at the home of 
Mrs. Jesse Henry Steinhart (Amy Sussman 
Steinhart, '02) in San Francisco, the Bryn 
Mawr Club of Northern California was form- 
ally organized. Eleven persons were present 
at this first meeting. Harriet Bradford, '15, 
and Eleanor Allen, '14, were elected president 
and secretary and treasurer respectively. 

There are thirty-nine alumnae and former 
students on the mailing list of the club. Eight 
of these have already paid their dues for the 
year. 

The president later appointed a committee 
on the Endowment Fund Campaign. Its 
membership is as follows: Mrs. Frank Henry 
Buck, Jr. (Zayda Zabriskie Buck, ex-'13), 
Chairman; Mrs. Bruce Porter (Margaret James 
Porter, ex-'lO); Mrs. Jesse Henry Steinhart 
(Amy Sussman Steinhart, '02); Harriet Brad- 
ford, '15, ex-officio; Eleanor Allen, '14, ex- 
officio. 

This committee has met once to make pre- 
liminary plans for the reception of Acting- 
President Helen Taft who, it is hoped, will 
visit this coast in March of this year. 
Respectfully submitted, 

Harriet Bradford, '15, 

President. 
Eleanor B. Allen, '14, 

Secretary- Treasurer. 



OHIO 

The Ohio Bryn Mawr club held its annual 
meeting toward the end of last March. Louise 
Congdon Francis, president of the Alumnae 
Association spoke and exhibited lantern slides 
of the college. The meeting was held on short 
notice in Columbus. As only one out of town 
member was present, it was decided not to hold 
elections at that time. Adeline Werner Vorys, 
'16, and Harriet S. Sheldon, '14, were appointed 
a nominating committee. They nominated 
Grace Latimer Jones, '00, for president and 
Dorothy Peters, ex-' 19, secretary. These nom- 
inations have not been voted upon as yet. 
Respectfully submitted, 
Harriet S. Sheldon, '14. 

PITTSBURGH 

Officers: President, Helen Schmidt, ex-'08; 
vice-president, Frances Rush Crawford, '00 
(completing unexpired term of Margaret Free 
Stone, '15, resigned); secretary, Henrietta 
Magoffin, '11; treasurer, Minnie List Chalfant, 
'08. 

Membership, 28; average attendance, 10 
to 12. 

Meetings: Held monthly, on the last Wednes- 
day of the month, at the homes of different 
members. 

Activities: A scholarship of the value of $200 
is raised annually by the club, and given to the 
applicant who, having completed the last two 
years of preparation in Allegheny County, has 
attained the highest grades in the entrance 
examinations. The scholarship is held this 
year by Miss Ruth Beardsley of the Freshman 
class. 

A French orphan, Marie de Lisle, is sup- 
ported by a fund raised by voluntary contribu- 
tions of the club members. 

A child from the Juvenile Court is also a 
ward of the Bryn Mawr Club, which is respon- 
sible for her clothing. 

Boxes are always packed for both children at 
Christmas time. 

Endowment Fund Campaign: Plans are now 
being made for the rapid but thorough canvass- 
ing of all Bryn Mawr women in the Pittsburgh 
section between this date (January 24) and 
January 31. A meeting in the interests of the 
endowment will be held on Wednesday, Janu- 
ary 28th, and another on February 10. The 
club hopes soon to complete its organization for 



58 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[April 



the drive, and intends later to make use of a 
Men's Committee for help in the outside can- 
vassing. One member of the faculty, Dr. 
Wheeler, spoke before the club at a special 
meeting during the holidays, and it is hoped 
that Acting President Taft will visit Pittsburgh 
in the spring. 

The Christmas luncheon, given in honor of 
the undergraduates home for the holidays, 
which was omitted last year as a war measure, 
was held in the University Club on December 
26 with an attendance of sixteen, including two 
undergraduates. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Helen Schmidt, '08, 

President. 
Henrietta Magoffin, '11, 
Secretary. 
ST. LOUIS 

At the first meeting of the Bryn Mawr Club 
of St. Louis the following officers for the year 
1919-20 were elected: Irene Loeb, '18, presi- 
dent; Alice Rubelman Knight, ex-' 19, vice- 
president and treasurer; Anna Reubenia Du- 
bach, '19, secretary. 

Edna Fischel Gellhorn and Irene Loeb made 
a report of the conference held at Bryn Mawr 
September 27-29 to consider the campaign for 
increased Faculty salaries. The club accepted 
the quota given them of $15,000 and decided 
to make the drive for funds the only work of 
the year. Thus the report of the club and the 
report of the Endowment Committee for St. 
Louis are necessarily the same. Anna Reu- 
benia Dubach is turning it over to the Alumnae 
Association in full. 

The new members of the club are: Anna 
Reubenia Dubach, '19, Janet Holmes, '19, 
Frances Allison, '19, Margaret Head Buchen, 
Helen Tredway Graham, '11, and Joanna Ross 
Chism, '16. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Irene Loeb, '18, 
President. 
WASHINGTON 

The Bryn Mawr Club of Washington met on 
January 28 at the National A. C. A. club house 
to arrange a suitable time for the dinner which 
was postponed on account of the inclement 
weather on January 24. Dean Smith has 
agreed willingly to postponement and the club 
is hoping February 22 will be the date when 
Washington will get started on the campaign. 



Meantime Louise Milligan Herron, '08, is 
chairman of a committee to find out if the 
authorities will permit what Agnes Murray, '11, 
described as a White Elephant Sale (camou- 
flage for rummage sale). Catherine Thomp- 
son, '12, and Margaret Free Stone, '15, will be 
publicity and business managers if it can be 
done. Others volunteered to be collecters of 
goods. The committee will report at a meeting 
called for Friday afternoon, January 31, and 
other plans will be discussed. 

About fifteen new members were elected 
during the year, helping to replace vacancies 
made by those who left Washington during the 
year. At the annual meeting called in Novem- 
ber on account of lack of a quorum the election 
of officers did not occur. Henrietta Riggs, '10, 
is therefore still vice president and treasurer 
and Elsie Funkhouser, '11, is secretary. The 
postponed annual meeting will be held early in 
February for the election of officers for 1919-20. 

Last January a meeting was held at the 
residence of Marjorie Walter Goodhart, ex-' 12, 
and it was then decided to try a new plan to 
increase attendance, i.e., to arrange for some 
suitable dining place and to meet there inform- 
ally. Through the courtesy of the manager of 
the Cosmos club, the Bryn Mawr club was 
allowed to use their dining room annex and to 
assemble afterwards in the ladies' drawing 
room. We had as guests of honor, several 
husbands and friends, one of whom, Professor 
Tinker of Yale University formerly of Bryn 
Mawr spoke on "Reconstruction at College." 
Nearly every one took part in the animated 
discussion that followed. Twenty people at- 
tended the dinner. Another dinner planned 
for Pierce Mill Inn in May did not occur. 

We were glad that for the first dinner of this 
year we could find a welcome at the New 
National A. C. A. club house, so charmingly 
situated on historic ground on Lafayette Square. 
Mr. and Mrs. Morgan were invited by the club, 
Mrs. Morgan as chairman of the club house 
committee having promised to talk about the 
club at the dinner. Our guest of honor, the 
Dean of Bryn Mawr college will find us on 
February 22, if the date is acceptable to her, a 
much more unified club after these emergency 
meetings and the annual meeting than if our 
plan for dinner on January 26 had carried. 
Respectfully submitted, 

Amy Rock Ransome, '93, 

President. 



1920] 



By-Laws 



59 



BY-LAWS 



Article I 



Article III. 



MEMBERSHIP 

Section 1. Any person who has received the degre e 
of Bachelor of Arts or of Doctor of Philosophy from Bryn 
Mawr College is entitled to full membership in the Alumnae 
Association of Bryn Mawr College, and to all privileges 
pertaining to such membership. 

Sec. 2. Former students of the College who have not 
received degrees may become Associate Members of the 
Alumnae Association upon unanimous election by the 
Board of Directors. Applications for associate member- 
ship must be made to the Board of Directors at least two 
months before the annual meeting, and the names of the 
applicants elected by the Board of Directors must be 
presented at this meeting. 

To be eligible for associate membership a former stu- 
dent must have pursued courses in the College for at least 
two consecutive semesters, and if a matriculated student, 
at least four academic years must have elapsed since the 
date of her entering the College. A return to the College 
for undergraduate work shall terminate an associate 
membership, and render the student ineligible for re- 
election during the period of this new attendance at the 
College. 

Associate members are entitled to all the rights and 
privileges of full membership, except the power of voting 
and the right to hold office in the Board of Directors, or to 
serve on standing committees. 

Article II 



Section 1. There shall be each year one regular meet- 
ing of the Association. This meeting shall be held at 
Bryn Mawr College, on a date to be fixed annually by the 
Board of Directors, preferably the Saturday of the mid- 
year recess. 

Sec. 2. Two weeks before the annual meeting notices 
of the date and of the business to be brought before the 
meeting shall be sent to each member of the Alumnae 
Association. If it s*hould be necessary to bring before the 
meeting business of which no previous notice could be 
given, action may be taken upon such business only by a 
two-thirds vote of the members present at the meeting. 
Sec. 3. Special meetings of the Association may be 
called at any time by the Corresponding Secretary at the 
request of the President, or of five members of the Associ- 
ation, provided that notice of the meeting and of all busi- 
ness to be brought before it be sent to each member of 
the Association two weeks in advance. 

Sec. 4. In cases demanding immediate action on 
matters clearly not affecting the financial or general policy 
of the Association, special meetings may be called by the 
Corresponding Secretary with less than two weeks' notice 
at the request of the Board of Directors or of ten members 
of the Association. At special meetings called on less 
than two weeks' notice action may be taken only by a 
two-thirds vote of the members present. 

Sec. 5. Fifteen members of the Association shall con- 
stitute a quorum for the transaction of business. 



MANAGEMENT 

Section 1. The Officers of the Association shall con- 
stitute a Board of Directors, to which shall be entrusted 
the management of the affairs of the Association in the 
nterim of its meetings. 

Article IV 

DUES 

Section 1. The annual dues for each member of the 
Association shall be two dollars payable to the Treasurer at 
the annual meeting. Associate members shall pay the same 
dues as full members of the Association, but shall be exempt 
from all assessments. 

Sec. 2. The dues for each member that enters the Asso~ 
elation in June shall be one dollar for the part year from 
June to the following February, payable to the Treasurer on 
graduation from the College. 

Sec. 3. Any member of the Association may become a 
life member of the Association upon payment at any time of 
forty dollars; and upon such Payment she shall become exempt 
from all annual dues and assessments. 

Sec. 4. The names of members who fail to pay the 
annual dues for four successive years shall be stricken 
from the membership list. The Board of Directors may 
at its discretion remit the dues of any member sub silentio. 

Article V 

BRANCH ORGANIZATIONS 

Section 1. Any 25 or more members of the Bryn 
Mawr College Alumnae Association may form a local 
branch, the geographical limits to be submitted to the 
Board of Directors of the Alumnae Association and to be 
approved by the Board of Directors. 

Sec. 2. Any alumna or former student of Bryn Mawr 
College who is eligible to membership in the Bryn Mawr 
College Alumnae Association may be a member of a Branch 
Organization. 

Sec. 3. Every Branch Organization shall report to 
The Alumnae Association at the annual meeting. 

Article VI 
committees 

Section 1. There shall be two Alumnae members of 
the Board of Directors of Bryn Mawr College in accord- 
ance with the by-laws of the Trustees of Bryn Mawr 
College. 

Sec. 2. The Standing Committees of the Association 
shall be: an Academic Committee, consisting of seven 
members; a Conference Committee, consisting of four 
members; a Students' Loan Fund Committee, consisting 
of five members; a James E. Rhoads Scholarships Com- 
mittee, consisting of three members; a Nominating Com- 
mittee, consisting of five members; a Finance Committee, 
consisting of three members and the Treasurer ex officio; 
and a Committee on Athletics, consisting of five members. 



60 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarter^ 



[April 



Article VII 

ELECTIONS AND APPOINTMENTS 

Section 1. Elections for Officers shall be held bienni- 
ally and elections for members of the Academic Committee 
annually, before the regular meeting, and the results of the 
elections shall be announced at that meeting; in every 
case the candidate receiving the greatest number of votes 
shall be declared elected. No ballot shall be valid that 
is not returned in a sealed envelope marked "Ballot." 

Sec. 2. The elections for the nomination of an Alumnae 
Director shall be held every three years on the last Thurs- 
day in May. No ballot shall be valid that is not signed 
and returned in a sealed envelope marked "Ballot." The 
alumna receiving the highest number of votes shall be 
nominated to the Trustees for the office of Alumnae Di- 
rector. At the first election in the year 1906, and at 
other elections when there is a vacancy to be filled, the 
alumna receiving the highest number of votes shall be 
nominated to the Trustees for the regular term of six 
years, and the alumna receiving the second highest number 
of votes for the term of three years. 

Sec. 3. The Officers of the Association shall be nomi- 
nated by the Nominating Committee, and elected by ballot 
of the whole Association. They shall hold office for two 
years or until others are elected in their places. The 
Board of Directors shall have power to fill any vacancy in 
its own body for an unexpired term. 

Sec. 4. The members of the Academic Committee 
shall be nominated as follows: The Board of Directors shall 
make at least twice as many nominations as there are 
vacancies in the Committee. Furthermore, any twenty- 
five alumna* may nominate one candidate for any vacancy 
in the Committee; provided that they sign the nomination 
and file it with the Recording Secretary by December 1, 
preceding the annual meetings. The members of the 
Academic Committee shall be elected by ballot of the 
whole Association and shall each hold office for four years 
or until others are elected in their places. The Board of 
Directors shall have power to fill any vacancy in the 
Committee, such appointment to hold until the next 
regular election. 

Sec. 5. (a) The Alumnae Directors shall be nominated 
as follows: The Board of Directors of the Alumnae 
Association shall make at least three times as many nomi- 
nations as there are vacancies among the Alumnae Di- 
rectors. It may at its discretion include in such nomina- 
tions names proposed in writing by any 25 members of 
the Alumnae Association qualified to vote for Alumnae 
Directors. 

( b) Every Bachelor of Arts or Doctor of Philosophy of 
Bryn Mawr College shall be qualified to vote for Alumnae 
Directors, provided that at least five years shall have 
elapsed since the Bachelor's degree was conferred upon 
her, and provided that she shall have paid her dues up to 
and including the current year. 

(c) Every Bachelor of Arts or Doctor of Philosophy 
shall be eligible for the office of Alumnae Director, pro- 
vided that at least five years shall have elapsed since the 
Bachelor's degree was conferred upon her, and provided 
that she is not at the time of nomination or during her 
term of office a member or the wife of a member of the staff 
of Bryn Mawr College, nor a member of the staff of any 
other college. 

(d) An Alumnae Director shall serve for six years or so 
much thereof as she may continue to be eligible. When- 
ever a vacancy shall occur among the Alumnae Directors 
a nomination for such vacancy shall be made by the Board 



of Directors of the Alumnae Association to the Trustees. 
An Alumnae Director so nominated shall hold her office 
until her successor has been voted for at the next regular 
election for Alumnae Director and duly elected by the 
Trustees. 

{e) In case by reason of a tie it should be uncertain 
which alumna has received the nomination of the Alumnae 
Association for Alumnae Director, the Board of Directors 
of the Alumnae Association shall nominate to the Trustees 
one of the two candidates receiving an equal number of 
votes. 

Sec. 6. The members of the Conference Committee 
shall be appointed annually by the Board of Directors 
and shall each hold office for one year or until others are 
appointed in their places. 

Sec. 7. The members of the Students' Loan Fund 
Committee shall be appointed by the Board of Directors 
from candidates recommended by the Loan Fund Com- 
mittee. They shall each hold office for five years or until 
others are appointed in their places. One new member 
shall be appointed each year to succeed the retiring mem- 
ber, and no member, with the exception of the Treasurer, 
shall be eligible for re-election until one year has elapsed 
after the expiration of her term of office. 

Sec. 8. The members of the James E. Rhoads Scholar- 
ships Committee shall be appointed by the Board of 
Directors, and shall each hold office for three years, or until 
others are appointed in their places. One new member 
shall be appointed each year to succeed the retiring mem- 
ber, and no member shall be eligible for re-election until 
one year has elapsed after the expiration of her term of 
office. 

Sec. 9. The Health Statistics Committee shall be a 
permanent committee, appointed by the Board of Direc- 
tors in consultation with the President of Bryn Mawr 
College. The Chairman of this Committee is empowered 
to fill vacancies in the Committee; a vacancy in the chair- 
manship shall be filled by the Board of Directors in con- 
sultation with the President of Bryn Mawr College. 

Sec. 10. The members of the Nominating Committee 
shall be appointed biennially by the Board of Directors, 
and shall each hold office for four years, or until others are 
appointed in their places. Two members of the Com- 
mittee shall be appointed in the year preceding an election 
for officers, and three members in the year preceding the 
next election for officers, and thereafter in the same order 
before alternate elections. 

Sec. 1 1 . The members of the Finance Committee shall 
be appointed by the Board of Directors and shall each 
hold office for four years, or until others are appointed 
in their places. 

Sec. 12. The members of the Committee on Athletics 
shall be appointed by the Board of Directors and shall 
each hold office for five years, or until others are appointed 
in their places. One new member shall be appointed each 
year to succeed the retiring member. 

Sec. 13. The appointments of the Board of Directors 
for the year ensuing shall be made in time to be reported 
by the Board to the annual meeting for ratification by the 
Association. 

Article VIII 

DUTIES 

Section 1. The President shall preside at all meetings 
of the Association and of the Board of Directors, and 
shall perform such other duties as regularly pertain to her 
office. She shall be a member ex officio of all the commit- 



1920] 



By-Laws 



61 



tees of the Association and shall countersign all vouchers 
drawn by the Treasurer before they are paid. She shall 
appoint such committees as are not otherwise provided for. 

Sec. 2. The Vice-President shall perform all the duties 
of the President in the absence of the latter. 

Sec. 3. The Recording Secretary shall keep the min- 
utes of the Association and of the Board of Directors, 
and shall perform such other duties as regularly pertain 
to the office of clerk. She shall have the custody of all 
documents and records belonging to the Association which 
do not pertain to special or standing committees, and she 
shall be the custodian of the seal of the Association. She 
shall notify committees of all motions in any way affecting 
them; she shall receive all ballots cast for the elections, and 
with the Chairman of the Nominating Committee shall 
act as teller for the same; and she shall be responsible for 
the publication of the Annual Report, which should be 
mailed to the Alumnae within two months after the annual 
meeting. 

Sec. 4. The Corresponding Secretary shall conduct all 
the necessary correspondence of the Association; she shall 
send out all notices, and shall inform officers and com- 
mittees of their election or appointment. 

Sec. 5. The Treasurer shall be the custodian of all 
funds of the Association and shall pay them out only by 
vouchers countersigned by the President; she shall collect 
all dues and assessments, shall file vouchers for all dis- 
bursements, and shall keep an account of all receipts and 
expenditures. She shall report on the finances of the 
Association when called upon, to the Association or to 
the Board of Directors, and she shall make to the Associa- 
tion at the annual meeting a full report, the correctness 
of which must be attested by a certified public accountant. 

Sec. 6. The Board of Directors shall prepare all busi- 
ness for the meetings of the Association, and shall have 
full power to transact in the interim of its meetings all 
business not otherwise provided for in these by-laws. 
It shall have control of all funds of the Association; it 
shall supervise the expenditures of committees, and it shall 
have power to levy assessments not exceeding in any 
one year the amount of the annual dues. At least one 
month before each annual meeting it shall send to each 
member of the Association a ballot presenting nominations 
for the Academic Committee in accordance with Art. VI, 
Sec. 4; biennially, at least one month before the annual 
meeting, it shall send to each member of the Association 
the ballot prepared by the Nominating Committee in 
accordance with Art. VII. Sec. 13. Every three years, at 
least one month before the last Thursday in May, it shall 
send to each member of the Association qualified to vote 
for Alumnae Directors a ballot presenting nominations for 
Alumnae Directors in accordance with Art. VI, Sec. 5. 
Through the President and Recording Secretary, it shall 
certify to the Trustees the names of persons voted for and 
the number of votes received for each person in elections 
for Alumnae Directors. It shall appoint before each an- 
nual meeting the members of the Conference Committee, 
and fill such vacancies on the Students' Loan Fund Com- 
mittee, the James E. Rhoads Scholarships Committee, 
the Finance Committee, and the Committee on Athletics, 
as may be necessary by reason of expiration of terms of 
office. It shall also appoint, in alternate years before the 
regular meeting preceding the biennial election, the mem- 
bers of the Nominating Committee and in case a vacancy 
occurs it shall appoint, in consultation with the President 
of Bryn Mawr College, the chairman of the Health Statis- 



tics Committee. It shall report all appointments to the 
regular meeting next following for ratification by the Asso- 
ciation. A majority of the Board shall constitute a quo- 
rum for the transaction of business. The Board of 
Directors shall be at all times responsible to the Asso- 
ciation. 

Sec. 7. The Academic Committee shall hold at least 
one meeting each academic year to confer with the Presi- 
dent of Bryn Mawr College on matters of interest con- 
nected with the College. It shall have full power to 
arrange the times of its meetings. 

Sec. 8. The Alumnae members of the Board of Direc- 
tors of Bryn Mawr College shall perform such duties as 
are prescribed by the laws of the Trustees and Directors 
of Bryn Mawr College. 

Sec. 9. The Conference Committee shall hold at least 
two meetings each academic year, one in the autumn and 
one in the spring, to confer with committees from the 
Undergraduate Association and the Graduate Club at 
Bryn Mawr College, on matters of interest to the three 
associations. It shall have power to call special meetings 
at its discretion. 

Sec. 10. The Students' Loan Fund Committee shall 
have immediate charge of the Loan Fund, and its disburse- 
ments, subject to the approval of the Board of Directors. 
It shall confer with the President of Bryn Mawr College 
regarding all loans. 

Sec. 11. The James E. Rhoads Scholarships Com- 
mittee shall, with the president of Bryn Mawr College and 
the Committee appointed by the Academic Council of the 
Faculty, nominate annually the candidates for the James 
E. Rhoads Scholarships to be conferred by the Board of 
Trustees of Bryn Mawr College according to the provisions 
contained in the Deed of Gift. 

Sec. 12. The Health Statistics Committee shall collect 
from the members of the Association information that 
may serve as a basis for statistics regarding the health 
and occupation of college women. The Committee, sub- 
ject to the approval of the Board of Directors, shall have 
power to determine the best methods of carrying out the 
duties assigned to it. 

Sec. 13. The Nominating Committee shall biennially 
prepare a ballot presenting alternate nominations for the 
officers of the Association and shall file it with the Re- 
cording Secretary by December 1 preceding the annual 
meeting. 

Sec. 14. The Finance Committee may with the ap- 
proval of the Board of Directors of the Alumnae Associ- 
ation, indicate purposes for which money shall be raised 
by the Alumnae Association. It shall devise ways and 
means, and take charge of collecting moneys for such 
purposes, and when authorized by the Alumnae Associ- 
ation shall prepare, subject to the approval of the Board of 
Directors, the necessary agreements for the transfer of 
gifts from the Alumnae Association. All collections from 
the Alumnae Association shall be subject to its super- 
vision. The Finance Committee shall have power to 
add to its number. 

Sec. IS. The Committee on Athletics shall try to 
stimulate an interest in athletics among the members of 
the Alumnae Association, and shall take official charge of 
all contests that are participated in by both alumnae and 
undergraduates. 

Sec. 16. The Board of Directors and all Committees 
shall report to the Association at the annual meeting, and 



62 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[April 



the Students' Loan Fund Committee shall report also to 
the Board of Trustees of Bryn Mawr College. 

Article IX 

RULES OF ORDER 

The rules of parliamentary practices as set forth in 
Roberts' "Rules of Order" shall govern the proceedings 
of this Association in so far as they are not inconsistent 
with any provisions of its charter or by-laws. 



Article X 

AMENDMENT OF BY-LAWS 

These by-laws may be amended or new ones framed by 
a two-thirds vote of the members present at any regular 
meeting of the association, provided that details of pro- 
posed amendments and additions have been given in 
writing at a previous regular meeting of the Association, 
either by the Board of Directors or by five members of the 
Association. 



ENDOWMENT ROUND TABLE HELD IN TAYLOR CHAPEL 



The date for the official start of the Endow- 
ment campaign was agreed upon as March 
1 when the Round Table conference met at the 
college on February 2. Caroline McCormick 
Slade, '96, chairman of the campaign, who pre- 
sided at the meeting, found by taking a vote of 
the individual state committees that only two 
states, Illinois and Delaware, were ready to 
begin by February 15, the original date set for 
the intensive campaign. 

Although there was discussion of various 
names by which the campaign should be offi- 
cially known, that of "Bryn Mawr Endow- 
ment" had the final approval of the meeting. 

Goal Remains $2,000,000 

A suggestion which met with much interested 
discussion was that for the redoubling of the 
goal — making the minimum to be sought 
$4,000,000 instead of $2,000,000. 

Susan Follansbee Hibbard, '97, said that she 
had found it an insurmountable criticism in the 
minds of many people that there is no music at 
Bryn Mawr. She therefore moved that the 
endowment goal be raised to $2,100,000, the 
additional $100,000 to go to establish a depart- 
ment of music here. No action was taken upon 
this suggestion as it was considered out of the 
province of the meeting. 

Mrs. Slade stated strongly the advisability 
of going to the public at this time for only the 
minimum amount of endowment necessary for 
the present needs of the college. She remarked, 
however, that there is nothing to prevent our 
exceeding this amount to any extent. The 
conference decided to hold to $2,000,000 as 
the minimum amount to be raised. 

Dr. Kingbury's Statistics 

A large part of the attention of the meeting 
was given to learning of the work which the 
John Price Jones Corporation is doing for 



publicity. Introductory to the speech of Mr. 
H. W. Thirlkeld, representing the corporation, 
Dr. Susan M. Kingsbury consented to explain 
the set of statistics and charts compiled by her, 
from which the John Price Jones Corporation 
is preparing the Major Pamphlet, stating the 
Bryn Mawr case. 

Dr. Kingsbury pointed to three outstanding 
facts: That the cost of living has advanced, 
that salaries have not advanced, and that 
salaries were inadequate before prices rose. 
The endeavor of the Major Pamphlet will be 
to present the facts clearly, together with the 
data to support these facts, which will prove 
them true. The plan which has been suggested 
is that the pamphlet should first take up the 
salaries and the cost of living; second, the sal- 
aries and the income of the college; third, the 
income of the college and its expenditures; 
fourth, the deficit of the college; and, fifth, the 
income-producing endowment and the non- 
income-producing endowment. Dr. Kingsbury 
stated that most colleges pay 50 per cent of 
their endowment towards professors' salaries, 
while Bryn Mawr pays 70 per cent 

In taking up the question of publicity, Mrs. 
Slade explained that while Bryn Mawr women 
do not want personal publicity, they do want 
the country to understand the situation. In 
theory, education for women has been accepted 
as a necessity, but when it comes to supporting 
women's colleges, men who give many thou- 
sands to men's colleges will give one thousand 
dollars to a woman's college. Therefore the 
case for women's colleges must be put more 
forcibly before the public. 

Cora Hardy Jarrett, '99, the National Public- 
ity Chairman, was not able to be present at 
this meeting because of influenza, so the report 
of this division was given by Maud Lowrey 
Jenks, '00, who carried on the work of the com- 
mittee in Mrs. Jarrett's absence. 



1920] 



Endowment Round Table 



63 



Publicity Methods 

Mr. Thirlkeld explained that Mr. Jones, 
president of the John Price Jones Corporation, 
is in constant communication with the National 
Chairman, and their joint endeavor is to send 
out whatever news is necessary — only actual 
happenings. The corporation handles the work 
of the national publicity committee, but in 
small towns the local publicity chairmen are 
asked to deal with their papers directly. First, 
they should get in touch with the newspapers, 
and ask them to publish material sent out by 
the John Price Jones Corporation, and also ask 
them to publish local news connected with 
Bryn Mawr. The local chairmen should give 
the newspapers as much help as possible in 
preparing their news. They should ask the 
papers to send reporters to their meetings, and 
send them advance notices of these meetings. 

In answer to inquiries, Mr. Thirlkeld made 
the following statements: As a general rule it is 
better to go to the city editor of a newspaper 
than to the society editor, but you may use 
both. Go to the city editor to give news, and 
to the society editor for reports of social gather- 
ings and personal items. It is more important 
to get material in the news columns, because 
they are more widely read. 

The John Price Jones Corporation will send 
feature stories, or plans for features that they 
think will carry, all over the country. A fea- 
ture may be anything that is outstanding, and 
that will create news. It is not straight prop- 
aganda. Tag day is a feature. Speaking from 
an automobile used to be a feature. If some- 
thing of human interest is put into a luncheon 
it is a feature. Smith wanted publicity, so 
they cooked the Smith muffin. Many people 
disapproved, but the news spread throughout 
the country. 

Gifts of Bryn Mawr 

Acting President Taft, who spoke at the 
afternoon session, explained the high entrance 
standards for which Bryn Mawr is famous, and 
remarked upon the influence which this neces- 
sarily thorough preparation has upon the 
standard of the work of the students while in 
college. It is noteworthy that there are only 
two or three students in each class who fail to 
get hold of the work and have to be dropped. 



After emphasizing the care which is taken of 
the health and physical condition of the stu- 
dents, and the spirit of democracy with which 
the college is imbued, Miss Taft said: "It is a 
difficult thing to put in words what Bryn 
Mawr attempts to give to the undergraduate 
body, but if there were any way in which we 
could make the country at large feel the con- 
tribution of Bryn Mawr, a small college, which 
gives to its students the background and inspi- 
ration which all of us have felt while here, we 
could prove the worth of Bryn Mawr better 
than in any other way. This can be done only 
by the alumnae body itself, and by the infor- 
mation and loving detail they can give about 
our college." 

Contributions Already Received 

Mr. Asa S. Wing, speaking on behalf of the 
trustees and directors, reported that up to date 
he had already received $73,300 in cash, and 
that he has pledges for $46,600, making a total 
of almost $122,000, which does not include the 
sum of about $70,000 which has been con- 
tributed for the Victory Chair, altogether mak- 
ing a total of nearly $200,000. In this connec- 
tion it was announced that Margaret Patterson 
Campbell, '90 (Mrs. Richard C. Campbell), 
had just telegraphed that she wished to present 
$25,000 to the Endowment as a memorial to 
her sister, Mary Patterson '88. 

Frances Browne, '09, chairman of the canvass- 
ing and district organization, told of the organi- 
zation's plans for seeing, or getting in touch 
with every single person who has ever been at 
Bryn Mawr. She said that the specific thing 
that every one can do to help is to send to 
National Headquarters any changes of address 
within their knowledge. She explained that 
present undergraduates are included in the 
cards sent to the different districts, as their 
interest is desired, but emphasized that their 
special contribution toward the campaign is 
the May Day Fete. 

Clara Vail Brooks, '97 (Mrs. Henry Stafford 
Brooks), speaking for the class collectors' organ- 
ization, stated that she desired to start rivalry 
among the classes. At the end, those alumnae 
or former students who have not subscribed will 
be appealed to specially, in order to secure a 
100 per cent response. 



64 



Tlie Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[April 



ENDOWMENT WORK IN FULL SWING LEAVES COMMENCE- 
MENT ALMOST FORGOTTEN 



The active work for the Endowment campaign 
gives the alumnae a chance to enjoy what seems 
to be one continual reunion. In the midst of 
all this excitement formal plans for Commence- 
ment have almost been forgotten. Only four 
classes have so far reported any definite arrange- 
ments for Commencement festivities. The 
1900 headquarters are to be in Pembroke, and 
the class supper in Rockefeller on May 31. 
1905 has reserved headquarters in Pembroke 
West from Saturday on through Commence- 
ment. The class supper will be in Denbigh on 
Monday, the 31st. 1910 also plans head- 
quarters in Pembroke, while 1919 will be in 
Denbigh. Edna Fischel Gellhorn '00 will be 
toastmistress at the Alumnae supper on Tues- 
day evening, June 1. 

It is a safe prediction however, that when 
the end of May rolls around there will be a rush 
to the campus of more than usual proportions, 
to hear proclaimed the glad news that the 
achievement of the $2,000,000 goal of the 
Endowment is a reality. 

Never before have so many alumnae of so 
many different ages and classes worked together 
day in and day out as is now the case. National 
headquarters in New York is by no means the 
only busy place, for the same scene of daily 
activity is repeated in Boston, at 467 Boylston 
Street, in Philadelphia, at 1300 Spruce Street, 
in Chicago, at 6 North Michigan Avenue, and 
in St. Louis, at 5227 Westminster Place. 
Providence, New Haven, Rochester, Pittsburgh, 
Baltimore, Washington, Columbus, Cincinnati, 
Cleveland, Detroit, Indianapolis, Madison, and 
San Francisco are also centers of effort. In 
fact, in every city or town where there is an 
alumna, there is a campaign. 

Suffragists Join Campaign 

And that not only alumnae, but that suffra- 
gists throughout the land are interested in the 
success of the Endowment was shown at the 
convention of the National American Women's 
Suffrage Association held in Chicago, February 
13, when the joint foundation of a department in 
Politics at Bryn Mawr, and a department in 
Preventive Medicine at the Women's Medical 
College in Philadelphia was voted as the 
National Suffrage Memorial to Dr. Anna 
Howard Shaw. 



Acting President Taft on Tour 

Acting President Helen Taft has been making 
a speaking tour of the country in the interest 
of the Endowment. She was in Washington on 
March 13, and was the guest of honor at what 
was, according to the Washington papers, "one 
of the most charming teas in many a day, given 
by Mrs. John Hays Hammond." 

In the West and South a speech made by 
Miss Taft in New York has been used as cam- 
paign material, with the idea that in districts 
where Bryn Mawr is an unknown quantity, 
the use of Miss Taft's name would serve to 
attract interest. 

On March 24 she began her longest trip, that 
to California and return in twenty-one days. 
She spoke at the Twentieth Century Club in 
Pittsburgh on "Modern Tendencies in Educa- 
tion" on March 25. She was in Cincinnati 
March 26, Louisville the 27th, New Orleans 
the 28th and 29th, Los Angeles and Santa 
Barbara from April 1 to 4, and in San Francisco 
until April 10, arriving back in Philadelphia 
on April 15. 

Speaking tours have also been planned in 
Chicago and Boston, where members of the 
central committees are touring the outlying 
sections of their districts. 

''Alice in Wonderland" 

A sLx-reel film of "Alice in Wonderland" is 
being given in many cities throughout the 
country, exclusively for the benefit of the Bryn 
Mawr Endowment. 

Financial Returns 

The report of the canvassers shows the 
financial standing of the districts up to April 
21st as follows: — 

Number Number 
Bryn Mawr sub- 
District number women scribers Pledges 

1. Maine, Mass., 

N.H.,Vt 367 163 $21,231.87 

la. R.I 9 320.00 

2. Conn., N. J., 

N. Y 932 504 306 543.50 

3. Del., Penn 908 502 157,685.30 

4. D. C, Md., Va., 

W. Va 259 111 8,998.75 



1920] 



Endowment Work in Full Swing 



65 



5. Ala., Fla., Ga., 

Ky., Miss., 
N. C, S. C, 
Tenn., La.... 124 10 805.00 

6. Ohio 115 114 24,739.00 

7. Indiana 47 18 3,120.00 

8. Michigan 38 16 1,887.10 

9. HI., Iowa, Minn., 

Wis 293 202 105,231.60 

10. Ark., Kans., Mo., 

Okla., Tex.... 110 39 10,021.15 

11. Ariz., Colo., Neb., 

N.Mex.,Utah. 56 1 50.00 

13. Oregon 19 1 1,000.00 

14. N.California.... 48 2 51.00 
Special 12 71,086.97 

15. S. California. ... 54 2 150.00 

17. England 46 2 30.00 

21. Canada, Spain, 

etc 2 6.35 

Total 1,717 $714,657.62 

Note: — The districts not mentioned in the 
above report, are those which have not as yet 
sent in a report to the National Headquarters. 
The district committees are vying with each 
other to produce original features which will 
help swell their quotas. Reports from some 
of the districts follow: 

New York Passes $100,000 
The New York District, up to March 10, had 
raised a total of $124,436 of which $101,241 was 
from the alumnae, $17,695 from donors, and 
$5,500 from undergraduates. 

In order to further their efforts to increase 
this amount to the quota of $1,000,000, the 
canvassers are holding weekly meetings, at the 
first of which Mr. James Craft, of the Guarantee 
Trust, spoke on Salesmanship. Mr. Guy 
Emerson, father of the Liberty Loan publicity, 
is to speak at another of these meetings. 

The members of the Ideas Committee lunch 
at the Bryn Mawr Club every Friday, and 
furnish one another with numerous suggestions 
and plans for raising money, obtaining publicity 
and creating interest. 

Atlantic City Board Walk 
Bryn Mawr Alumnae in St. Louis have 
joined forces with alumnae of Smith and Wash- 
ington University to swing a ten day bazaar 
(April 4-15) in the St. Louis Coliseum, to be 
converted for that time into the "Atlantic City 
Board Walk." A thousand women are work- 
ing on the various committees; many of the 



shops have cleared their expenses before open- 
ing their doors; all plans and arrangements 
have received excellent publicity. 

Edna Fischel Gellhorn (Mrs. George Gell- 
horn) '00 represents Bryn Mawr on the Board 
Walk Executive Committee and is chairman 
of Publicity; Emily Westwood Lewis (Mrs. 
Joseph W. Lewis) is chairman of the Program 
Committee; Erma Kingsbacher Stix (Mrs. 
Ernest Stix), '06, and Elsie Kohn Rauh (Mrs. 
Aaron Rauh), '04 have charge of the candy 
shop; and Frances Allison, '19, will tell for- 
tunes. 

Bryn Mawr Billboard 

The Chicago District has already collected 
over $96,000, most of which comes from Bryn 
Mawrtyrs and their families. The second hun- 
dred thousand has to be elicited from the gen- 
eral public. A list of potential donors has been 
prepared by Grace Douglas Johnston (Mrs. 
Morris L. Johnston), '02, and Alta Stevens 
Cameron (Mrs. Anson Cameron), '09, and 
teams of canvassers are ready to spring out when 
the signal is given. 

John T. McCutcheon, a well-known car- 
toonist, husband of Evelyn Shaw McCutcheon, 
'14, has made a cartoon which is being used as 
a poster for the drive, and other posters and 
buttons are being prepared and placed all over 
the city in busses and shops. Julia Thompson, 
ex-' 10, dressed in a bright yellow smock and 
seated on a ladder, is painting a Bryn Mawr 
advertisement on a very prominent wall oppo- 
site the Rush Street bridge. Her subject is 
the well-known one — a girl in a cap and gown 
holding up a lighted lantern, and under her the 
slogan "Bryn Mawr College looking for 
$2,000,000." This same design is used on the 
buttons. 

There is a Bryn Mawr Toy Shop in Winnetka 
at the residence of Carmelita Chase Hinton 
(Mrs. Sebastian Hinton), '12. All the Bryn 
Mawrtyrs of Winnetka and their husbands, 
and some non-Bryn Mawrtyrs, work there, 
cutting out and painting bright-colored wooden 
toys, which are to be sold at a counter in 
Stevens' department store during the drive. 
Anna Dunham Reilly (Mrs. John Reilly), '08, 
is collecting the workers, while Isabel Lynde 
Dammann (Mrs. J. Francis Dammann, Jr.), 
'05, is in charge of designing the toys. 

Cash in California 

At a preliminary meeting of the Bryn Mawr 
Club of Northern California, $3350 was re- 



66 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[April 



ported already pledged by individual subscrip- 
tions — which, with the $51 reported from head- 
quarters, makes the total from that district 
$3401. The subscribers are: through Ruth 
Babcock Deems (Mrs Charles P. Deems), '10, 
$1000; Zayda Zabriskie Buck (Mrs. Frank 
Henry Buck, Jr.), ex-' 13, $500; Frank Henry 
Buck, Jr., $500; Mrs. Frank Henry Buck, Sr., 
$500; Alice Sussman Arnstein (Mrs. Walter 
Arnstein), ex-'07, $200; Amy Sussman Stein- 
hart (Mrs. Jesse Henry Steinhart), '02, $200; 
Mrs. Sussman, $100; Harriet Bradford, '15, 
$100; Estelle Anne Robinson Kimball (Mrs. 
John H. Kimball), graduate student '98-'99, 
$100; Vernette L. Gibbons, Ph.D., '14, $50; 
Helen S. Lautz, '12, $100; Larie Klein Boas 
(Mrs. Boas), '16, $200. 

Michigan Busy 
Up to date the Michigan district has raised a 
total of $1381, from 10 individual subscrip- 
tions of Bryn Mawr women and their relatives, 
and has verbal promises of $200 more. There 
are 28 Bryn Mawr women in Michigan, 11 of 
whom are alumnae. The State executive com- 
mittee is composed of: — Marianna Buffum 
Hill (Mrs. Perry C. Hill), '01, State Chairman; 
Marion Wright Messimer (Mrs. Robert L. 
Messimer), '01, Detroit Chairman; Marjorie 
Green Mulock (Mrs. Edwin M. Mulock), ex-'03, 
State Organizer and Publicity Manager; Edith 

B. Wright, '00, Secretary and Treasurer; Emily 
Anthony Robbins (Mrs. Frederick W. Robbins), 
'89; Florence Wattson Hay (Mrs. Muller S. 
Hay), '03; and Marion Houghton Mason (Mrs. 
Stevens T. Mason), '03. 

Play for Bryn Mawr 

The New Haven committee will produce 
"Abraham Lincoln," with the New York com- 
pany complete, early in April. Other events 
planned for the campaign are a moving-picture 
film for children during April and a ball on May 
8th, on the evening of the big baseball game 
between Yale and Brown. 

The personnel of this committee is: Evan- 
geline Walker Andrews (Mrs. Charles Andrews), 
'93, Chairman; Margaret T. Corwin, '12; Mary 

C. Withirigton, '06; Millicent Pond, '10; Made- 
line Palmer Bakewell (Mrs. Charles M. Bake- 
well), '99; Martha Jenkins Foote (Mrs. Harry 
W. Foote), '02; Alice Jaynes Tyler (Mrs. 
Leonard Tyler), '05. 

Dinner in Capital 
The Washington Bryn Mawr Club held a 



dinner on Saturday evening, February 28 in 
the new National Clubhouse of the Association 
of Collegiate Alumnae, 1607 H Street. Dean 
Hilda Smith was the guest of honor and prin- 
cipal speaker. The dinner was held to arouse 
interest in, and discuss plans for, activity in 
connection with raising tjie Endowment. 

Arrangements were made for the enrollment 
of every club member present in some sort of 
work necessary in the campaign — typing, doing 
errands, canvassing, telephoning, etc. 

Margaret Free Stone, (Mrs. J. Austen Stone) 
'15, the newly elected president of the club, 
introduced the speakers, the first of whom was 
Mrs. Raymond Morgan, chairman of the House 
Committee of the National Club House of the 
Association of Collegiate Alumnae. Mrs. Mor- 
gan spoke of the privileges and opportunities 
afforded to members of the National Club, 
especially to non-resident members. 

The next speaker was Mr. F. L. Ransome, 
treasurer of the National Academy of Sciences 
and husband of Amy Rock Ransome, '93, 
retiring president of the Bryn Mawr Club. 
Mr. Ransome's subject was "Stabilizing the 
Dollar." Mr. Ransome set forth in a very 
clear, concise way Professor Irving Fisher's 
plan for keeping the value of the dollar con- 
stant. At the end of Mr. Ransome's talk a sense 
of the meeting was taken in which the Club en- 
dorsed Professor Fisher's plan. It was re- 
marked by Mrs. Ransome that a bill was to 
come before Congress in a few days which has 
Professor Fisher's approval. It was voted 
that the club send Representative Husted its 
approval of the bill. 

Dean Smith made an eloquent plea on behalf 
of the professors, citing facts both humorous 
and pathetic. 

Charlotte Harding ex-' 16, who is the local 
chairman of the Bryn Mawr Endowment, out- 
lined plans for the work of this district, and 
plead for the active interest of every member 
of the club. 

Three Bryn Mawr lanterns, lighted, hung 
about the dining room, and Bryn Mawr daisies 
decorated the table. College songs, led by 
Dean Smith, were sung between courses, and 
at the unanimous demand, "W-e w-a-n-t 
J-o-n-a-h," Dean Smith succumbed and gave 
that also. Old-time college enthusiasm was 
aroused, and as a direct result of this dinner, 
pledges and cash amounting to $1135 were sent 
to the local treasurer by alumnae who had been 
present. 



1920J 



Endowment Personnel 



67 



Mardi Gras Ball 
The Endowment committee working at Rye, 
N. Y., reports between $125 and $150 raised 
at a Mardi Gras ball given recently. 

Indiana has rasied $3200 to date by individual 
subscriptions, the proceeds from a dance swell- 
ing the total $300. The Endowment com- 
mittee in Indianapolis is arranging for a break- 
fast of 100 at which Katrina Ely Tiffany will 
speak. Moving picture benefits are planned 
this month. 

Perhaps the most excitement in connection 
with the Endowment is felt right in the Bryn 
Mawr district itself. The undergraduates, 
whose big contribution to the Endowment is 
to be May Day, with all its publicity, are also 
giving many entertainments for the benefit of 
the fund. The History Club gave a benefit 
performance of "The Last of the Crusaders" 
in the gymnasium on March 16. 

The Undergraduate Endowment Committee, 
which is composed of Darthela Clark, '20, Milli- 
cent Carey, '20, Catherine Bickley, '21, Kath- 

ENDOWMENT 

Staff National Headquarters, Bryn MAWgr <t 

Endowment v £t O .&'' 
yjA i > » ' 

"""*"*> National Chairman, Mrs. F. Louis Slade. 

Secretary, Miss M. Scofield. 

Vice Chairman-Chairman of Potential Donors, 
Mrs. Learned Hand. 

Secretary, Miss B. Post. <^ > 

Treasurer, Miss Helen Sturgis^r**-*" 
}Jy 1* *~^ Publicity Chairman, Mrs. E. Jarrett. 

y Features Chairman, Mrs. Ernest Angell. 

Speakers' Bureau Chairman, Mrs. R. Jenks. 

Secretary, Miss Hope Butler. 

Chairman of Convassing and Organization 
Miss Frances Browne. 

Executive Secretary, Miss Caroline Crawford. 

Secretary, Mrs. W. Treadway. 

Office Manager, Miss L. Couch, Miss E. Giles. 

Chief Clerk, Filing and Recording, Miss M. 
McKibbin. 

Recording Clerk, Miss M. Skelding. 

Recording Clerk, Miss H. Meade. 

District 1 

maine, massachusetts, new hampshire, 
and vermont 

Chairman, Miss Margaret G. Blaine, '13, 
535 Beacon Street, Boston, Mass. 



V^ 



arine Gardner, '22, and Florence Martin, '23, 
is in touch with the Philadelphia committee and 
also with National headquarters. Mrs. Slade 
spoke before an undergraduate meeting on 
February 10, and Mrs. Jarrett on March 10. 
Cora Baird Jeanes, chairman of estimates for 
Philadelphia, entertained the committee at 
luncheon on March 13. 

Plans are being made for visits of Philadel- 
phia society women and sub-debutantes to the 
college in May, when they will be taken on a 
tour of the campus and entertained at tea. 

The Bureau of Information in Taylor Hall 
is taking and selling pictures of college activities, 
and is the source of Bryn Mawr information for 
Endowment workers throughout the country. 
It is also acting as the college publicity office. 

Mary Kinsley Best (Mrs. William H. Best), 
'08, has already made $75 for the Endowment 
by taking magazine subscriptions and renewals. 
She is still in the business, representing all the 
leading American periodicals. Alumnae are 
asked to take the trouble to order through her 
in order that the publishing house commissions 
may be turned into the Two Million Dollar Fund. 

PERSONNEL 

Publicity Chairman, Miss. Marjorie Young, *M N 
'08, 294 Ashmont Street, Boston, Mass. 

Chairman for Maine, Vermont, and New Hamp- 
shire, Mrs. W. C. Hodgdon, '14, High Street, 
Westwood, Mass. 

Chairman for Massachusetts, excluding Bos- ]k 
ton, Mrs. Ingersoll Bowditch, '99, 3,2 Woodland 
Road, Jamaica Plain, Mass. 

Chairman for Boston and Suburbs, Miss 
Elizabeth Ayer, '14, 518 Beacon Street, Boston, 
Mass. 

Chairman of Potential Donors for Boston and 
Men's Committee, Mrs. Charles G. Loring, '13, 
8 Otis Place, Boston. 

Treasurer, Mrs. Ingersoll Bowditch, '99. 

Secretary and Office Manager, Miss Virginia ^- 
Litchfield, '17. 

Chairman of Organization and Canvassing, * p- 
Mrs. Milton J. Rosenau, '00. 

Chairman A. H. S. Membership, Mrs. Richard " 
Fitzgerald, '93. 

Office Address, 367 Boylston Street, Boston, 
Mass. 

District 1 a {Rhode Island) 

Chairman, Mrs. Francis G. Allinson, '92, 163 ^., 
George Street, Providence, R. I. 



68 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[April 



Vice-Chairman, Miss Edith Edwards, '97, St. 
James Hotel, Woonsocket, R. I. 
LrVTv^"' Secretary, Mrs. Robert Parsons, '17, 145 
University Avenue, Providence, R. I. 

Publicity Chairman, Miss Bertha Greenough, 
'17, 203 Blackstone Building, Providence, R. I. 

District 2 

connecticut, new jersey, and new york 

Chairman, Mrs. A. B. Maclay, '06. Office — 
124 E. 28th Street, New York City; 135 W. 
58th Street. 

Publicity Chairman, Miss Marguerite Alston 
Jones, ex-' 15, 729 Seventh Avenue, New York 
v City. 

" Chairman on Estimates, Mrs. Shepard Mor- 
gan, '09, 163 E. 80th Street, New York City. 
a V** .- Chairman Speakers' Bureau, Mrs. J. J. Moor- 
head, '04, 115 E. 64th Street, New York City. 
ifo* Treasurer, District 2, Mrs. Edward T. Loomis, 
'05, 160 W. 59th Street, New York City. 



of W 



New York State 
Chairman, Mrs. Henry R. Hayes, '13, 56 W- 
10th Street, New York City. 

Chairman Potential Donors, Mrs. Arthur 
Scribner, '91, 39 W. 67th Street, New York 
City. 
jj Chairman Canvassing New York City, Miss 
Florence King, Ex.-'96, 14 E. 60th Street, New 
York City. 

Connecticut 
Chairman for State and Hartford, Mrs. Her- 
bert Knox Smith, '03, Farmington, Conn. 



*T> 



^■'Chairman New Haven, Mrs. Charles McLean 



y 



Andrews, '93, 34 Edgehill Road, New Haven, 
Conn. 

Chairman Greenwich, Miss Elizabeth Lanier, 
'19, Greenwich, Conn. 

vtw* New Jerse y 

Chairman, Mrs. Robert E. Speer, '94, Engle- 
wootf, N. J. 
^^fChairman, Trenton, Mrs. Henry C. Blackwell, 
'99, 210 W. State Street, Trenton, N. J. 

Chairman, Princeton, Miss Marian T. Mac- 
intosh, '90, Princeton, N. J. 

Chairman, Central New Jersey, Mrs. Frederic 
R. Kellogg, '00, 25 Colles Avenue, Morristown, 
N.J. 

Publicity Representatives, Mrs. Charles Car- 
roll, 105 Highland Place, Ithaca, N. Y.; Mrs. 
Benjamin Nields, 148 Milton Road, Rye, N. Y.; 
Miss Alice VanHorn, Heathcote Road, Scars- 
dale, N. Y.; Mrs. F. T. Ackerman, Lawrence 



Park, Bronxville, N. Y.; Mrs. William R. 
Barbour, Kappock Street, Spuyten Duyvil, 
N. Y.; Miss Charlotte Dodge, 330 Oxford, 
Street, Rochester, N. Y.; Miss Mary D. Hop- 
kins, Clinton, N. Y.; Miss Dorothy Eby, 728 
W. State Street, Trenton, N. J. 

Local Chairmen (New York), Mrs. William 
R. Barbour, Kappock Street, Spuyten Duyvil, 
N. Y.; Mrs. Benjamin Nields, 148 Milton 
Road, Rye, N. Y.; Miss Alice VanHorn, Heath- 
cote Road, Scarsdale, N. Y.; Mrs. Charles 
Carroll, 105 Highland Place, Ithaca, N. Y.; 
Mrs. Theodore Gilman, 311 Palisade Avenue, 
Yonkers, N. Y.; Mrs. H. C. Wright, Douglas- 
ton, Long Island, N. Y.; Miss Elise Gignoux, 
Great Neck, Long Island, N. Y.; Mrs. David 
Goodnow, Edgewood Avenue, Pelham Manor, 
N. Y.; Mrs. C. W. Dale, Cedarhurst, Long 
Island, N. Y.; Miss Gladys King, 46 Stuyvesant 
Place, New Brighton, S. L, N. Y.; Miss Helen 
Everett, Vassar College, Poughkeepsie, N. Y.; 
Mrs. William Brewster, 14 Weeks Avenue, 
Hempstead, L. L; N. Y.; Mrs. C. C. Schmitt, 
Hunter Avenue, New Rochelle, N. Y. 

Local Chairmen (New Jersey), Mrs. John L. 
Kemmerer, Short Hills, N. J.; Mrs. John Day, 
69 Hobart Avenue, Summit, N. J.; Miss Grace 
E. Bruner, 5115 Atlantic Avenue, Ventnor, 
N. J.; Miss Emma J. Cadbury, 254 E. Main 
Street; Moorestown, N. J.; Mrs. Millard F. 
Sewall, 195 E. Commerce Street, Bridge ton, 
N.J. 

District 3 

delaware and pennsylvania 

Chairman, Miss Elizabeth B. Kirkbride, '96, 
1360 Spruce Street, Philadelphia. 

Office Manager, Miss Agnes Irwin, '10, 1300 
Spruce Street, Philadelphia. 

■~ Sub-Chairmen, Delaware, Mrs. Wilfred Ban- ^-v\ \°T 
croft, '98, 803 Broome Street, Wilmington, 
Del.; Pennsylvania (excluding Philadelphia), 
Mrs. Clarence G. Hoag, '96, Walnut Lane, 
Haverford, Pa. 

Philadelphia 

Chairman, Miss Gertrude Ely, '99, Bryn Mawr, 
Pa. 

- Vice-Chairmen, Mary Peirce, '12, Haverford, 
Pa.jXMrs. Samuel C. Henning, ex-'97, College 
Inn, Bryn Mawr, Pa.; Mrs. Daniel S. Keller, 
ex-' 19, Rosemont, Pa. 

> Secretary, Miss Mary Christine Smith, '14, 
1300 Spruce Street, Philadelphia. 

• Treasurer, Mrs. John Woodall, '98, 1300 \JU/V 
Spruce Street, Philadelphia. 



1920] 






^> Committee on Publicity, Mrs. David Riesman, 
'03, 1715 Spruce Street, Philadelphia \ Mrs. 
Stogdell Stokes, '11, 2017 Pine Street, Phila- 
delphia;" Mrs. Julius Stern, The Clinton, Phila- 
delphia; IVliss Adelaide W. Neall, '06, c/o 
Curtis Publishing Company, Philadelphia. 

Committee on Alumnae Canvass — Chairman, 
Miss Marion Reilly, '01, 1300 Spruce Street, 
Philadelphia. 

>. Committee on Potential Donors — Chairman, 

"' Miss Anne H. Todd, '02, 2125 Spruce Street, 
Philadelphia. 

Committee on Canvassers, Miss Mary Peirce, 
'12, Haverford, Pa. 

Committee on Estimates — Chairman, Mrs. 
Henry S. Jeanes, ex-'96, 2012 Spruce Street, 
Philadelphia. 

Js». Local Publicity Chairmen, Mrs. Carroll 
Miller, 4 Van Lent Placte, E. E., Pittsburgh, Pa.; 
Miss Elsie Moore, Danville, Pa.; Miss Mary 
Norcross, 243 S. Hanover Street, Carlisle, Pa.; 
Mrs. Robert Pyle, Westgrove, Pa.; Miss Jane 
Righ'ter, Mount Carmel, Pa.; Mrs. Thomas 
Ross, "Roscommon," Doylestown, Pa.; Miss 
Maud Sollenberger, Mahanoy City, Pa.; Miss 
L. M. Tatertshall, White Haven, Pa.; Mrs. 
Henry Van Dyne, Troy, Pa.; Miss Helen B. 
Zimmerman, Penn Hall School for Girls, 
Chambersburg, Pa.; Miss Anna Harlan, 357 
Chestnut Street, Coatesville, Pa.; Miss Helen 
Irey, 608 S. High Street, West Chester, Pa. 

Pennsylvania 

Local Chairmen 

* Bellefonte, Miss Mary Hunter Linn, Belle- 
fonte, Pa. 

~\ Bethlehem and Easton, Mrs. Edward B. Hill, 
1318 Prospect Avenue, Bethlehem, Pa. 
M Bucks County, Mrs. Thomas Ross, Ros- 
common, Doylestown, Pa. 
_\ Carlisle, Mrs. Ruter William Springer, 228 
Conway Street, Carlisle, Pa. 

Chambersburg and vicinity, Miss Helen B. 
Zimmerman, Penn Hall School, Chambersburg, 
Pa. 
^O-* Chester County, Mrs. Edward Page Allinson, 
Town's End Farm, West Chester, Pa. 

Danville and vicinity, Miss Phoebe Curry, 
Danville, Pa. 

Erie and vicinity, Miss Ruth Hamilton, 220 
W. 9th Street, Erie, Pa. 

Harrisburg, Miss Sarah Jacobs, 217 S. Front 
Street, Harrisburg (acting temporarily) 

Lancaster and vicinity, Mrs. Charles S. 
Foltz, 249 Charlotte Street, Lancaster, Pa. 



Endowment Personnel 



69 



vv 



Lebanon and vicinity, Mrs. T. S. Quinn, The 
Heights, Lebanon, Pa. 

Pittsburgh and vicinity, Miss Henrietta 
Magoffin, Westminster Place no. 2, 800 Aiken 
Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pa. (chairman not yet 
appointed). 

Pottstown, MLis Christine Hammer, 716 High 
Street, Pottstown, Pa. 

Pottsville and vicinity, Miss Anne A. Boyer, 
219 Mahantongo Street, Pottsville, Pa. 

Reading and vicinity, Mrs. W. S. Delany, 
309 S. 5th Street, Reading, Pa. 

Somerset and vicinity, Miss Sally A. Zimmer- 
man, Somerset, Pa. 

Wilkes-Barre, Miss Louise Thomas, 142 S. 
Franklin Street, Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 

Williamsport and vicinity, Miss Henrietta N. 
Huff, 915 Cambell Street, Williamsport, Pa. 

Altoona, Mrs. Joseph D. Findlay, 2406 Second 
Avenue. 

Annville, Miss Charlotte McLean, Lebannon 
Valley College. 

Bedford, Mrs. John R. Blackburn, East John 
Street. 

Berwyn, Mrs. Harold R. Aiken, Mrs. W. P. 
Bentz. 

Dimock, Susquehannah Co., Mrs. Francis R. 
Cope, Jr. 

Easton, Mrs. George C. Macan. Jr., 202 Tay- 
lor Avenue. 

Haverford, Mrs. C. G. Hoag. 

Hazleton, Mrs. Alvan Markle, Jr 

Indiana, Miss Jane Beardwood, State Normal 
School. 

New Wilmington, Del., Miss Margaret Mc- 
Laughry. 

Oaks, Montgomery Co., Mrs. Caleb Cresson, 
Jr., The Rectory. 

Reading, Miss Beulah Fegley, 952 N. Fifth 
Street. 

Wilmington, Del., Mr*. Wilfred Bancroft, 803 
Broome Street. 

District 4 
district of columbia, maryland, virginia, 
and west virginia 
^ Chairman, Miss Amy Steiner, '99, 1512 
Bolton Street, Baltimore, Md. 
y Vice-Chairman, Miss Ellen Kilpatrick, ex-'99, 
1027 St. Paul Street, Baltimore, Md. 
y Treasurer, Miss Constance Hall, '17, 347 N. 

Charles Street, Baltimore, Md. 
> Chairman for Maryland, Miss Olga Kelly, 
'14, 1406 Eutaw Place, Baltimore, Md. 

Chairman, for Baltimore, Miss Olga Kelly, 
'14, 1406 Eutaw Place, Baltimore, Md. 



70 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[April 



> 



Baltimore 

Vice-Chairman, Mrs. Robert M. Lewis, 347 
N. Charles Street, Baltimore. 

Potential Donors, Chairman, Miss Mary 
Kilpatrick, 347 N. Charles Street, Baltimore. 

General Canvassing, Chairman, Mrs. L. Allam 
Dill, 10 Overhill Road, Roland Park. 

District Treasurer, Miss Constance Hall, 347 
N. Charles Street, Baltimore. 
' Speakers' Bureau, Miss Frances Seth, 347 N. 
Charles Street, Baltimore. 

Publicity Chairman, Miss E. Buckner Kirk, 
347 N. Charles Street, Baltimore. 

Publicity Chairman, Maryland, Miss E. Buck- 
ner Kirk, '16, 207 Longwood Road, Roland Park, 
Baltimore, Md. 

- Chairman. Washington, D. C, Miss Charlotte 
Harding, ex-'16, Cathedral Close, Washington, 
D. C. 

Publicity Chairman, District of Columbia 
Mrs. James A. Stone, 2831 28th Street N. W. 
Washington, D. C. 

Treasurer, Washington D. C, Miss Elsie 
Funkhouser, A. & B. Building, Government 
Hotel, Washington, D. C. 

District Columbia Canvassing Chairman, Mrs. 
Leslie L. Jordan, 1831 Belmont Road, Wash- 
ington, D. C. 

District 5 
alabama, florida, georgia, kentucky, loui- 
siana, mississippi, north carolina, south 
carolina and tennessee 

• i Chairman, Mrs. Samuel C. Henning, ex-'97 
College Inn, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Chairman, South Carolina, Mrs. S. T. Lan- 
ham, '00, 135 Hampton Drive, Spartansburg, 
S. C. 

Chairman, Louisville, Ky., Miss Maria Bed- 
inger, '91, Anchorage, Kentucky. 

Chairman, Mississippi, Mrs. E. C. Ewing, 
Scott, Mississippi. 

District 6 

OHIO 

.' Chairman, Mrs. Samuel E. Strong, ex-'03, 
2060 E. 100th Street, Cleveland, O. 
: V ice-Chairman, Mrs. Julian A. Pollack, '08, 
927 Red way Avenue, Cincinnati, O. 
• State Organizer, Miss Marie R. Wing, '07, 
3133 Prospect Avenue, Cleveland, O. 
• Cleveland Chairman, Miss Alice P. Gannett, 
'98, 1420 E. 31st Street, Cleveland, O. 

Cleveland Publicity Chairman, Miss Cath- 
erine Jopling, '17, 1929 E. 90th Street, Cleve- 
land, O. 



Cincinnati Chairman, Miss Gwendolyn Raw- 
son, '13, 3767 Clifton Avenue, Cincinnati, O. 
*"'* Cincinnati Publicity Chairman, Miss Cath- 
arine Anderson, '06, Grandin Road, Cincin- 
nati, O. 

S Cincinnati Organizing Chairman, Miss Cath- 
arine Godley, '16, 768 E. Ridgway Avenue, 
Avondale, Cincinnati, O. 

"> Columbus Chairman, Miss Dorothy Peters, 
Stanley Hall, Station B, R. D. no. 1, Colum- 
bus, O. 

District 7 

INDIANA 

Chairman, Mrs. F. N. Lewis, '93, 3221 N. 
Pennsylvania Street, Indianapolis. 

Publicity Chairman, Mrs. J. A. MacDonald, 
'12, 3227 N. Pennsylvania Street, Indianapolis. 

Secretary, Indiana, Mrs. Joseph J. Daniels, 
'18, 1318 N. New Jersey Street, Indianapolis. 
■ ..Chairman Potential Donors, Mrs. Thomas R. 
Kackley, '94, 1312 N. Meridian Street, Indian- 
apolis. 

Indianapolis Chairman, Mrs. B. D. Hitz, 
'16, 1121 N. Meridian Street, Indianapolis. 

Secretary, Mrs. Joseph J. Daniels, '18, 1315 
N. New Jersey Street, Indianapolis. 

District 8 
michigan 
? Chairman, Mrs. Perry Childs Hill, '02, 212 
Glynn Court, Detroit, Mich. 

Organizer and Publicity Chairman, Mrs. E. M. 
Mulock, ex-'03, 111 Moss Avenue, Highland 
Park, Detroit, Mich. 

Secretary and Treasurer, Miss Edith B. 
Wright, '00, 739 E. Jefferson Avenue, Detroit, 
Mich. 

Detroit Chairman, Mrs. Robert L. Messimer, 
'01, 39 Washington Road, Grosse Point Village. 

District 9 
illinois, iowa, minnesota, and wisconsin 
Chairman, Mrs. W. G. Hibbard, Jr., '97, 

,y , nnm 505 Trwpr " B uilding fi.j>J Mjrln'^ai^ 

•^vrmiPi Chicago U) i/ww*>0k-^ J 9Ji - 

Chairman Publicity, Miss Marion Scott, '11, 
R oo m 505 TovVei Build i ng^ 6 NfJVli e higy r\ 
Aye»«e T XhicagX). ' $l I H QaAp^ ^J^ OLuu 

A. II. S. Chairman, Mrs. James Morrison, '99, 
5 0^ To vrr r Bnild i n , f \ TT ftftcirigan V ' ^ ii n - 
Chicago. 7lf 



^TlFl 



> Secretary and Treasurer, Miss Harriot Hough- 
teling, eje^O77-^505~^I^weF"BTrrIdm g, 6 Sfcwtfe 
Michigan A ~ tr ^mip J Chicago \JJ 




>fl 



1920] 



Endowment Gift 



71 



Illinois 

Chairman, Mrs. W. G. Hibbard, Jr., '97, 
505 Tower Building, 6 N. Michigan Avenue, 
Chicago. 

""' Vice-Chairman, Mrs. Cecil Barnes, '07, 1153 
N. Dearborn Street, Chicago (or same as above). 
Chairman Publicity, Miss Marion Scott, '11, 
(address same as above). 

Chairman Potential Donor, Mrs. Morris Johns- 
ton, '02 (address same as above). 

> Minneapolis Chairman, Mrs. Vernon Ames 
Wright, '98, 121 Clifton Avenue, Minneapolis, 
Minn. 

j? Madison Chairman, Mrs. Hobart S. Johnson, 
ex-'96, 130 E. Gorham Street, Madison Wis. 
' ' Milwaukee Chairman, Mrs. W. M. Chester, 
'14, 316 Juneau Avenue, Milwaukee, Wis. 
' Iowa Chairman, Miss Cornelia Meigs, '07, 
123 Morgan Street, Keokuk, Iowa. 

District 10 

arkansas, kansas, missouri, oklahoma, texas 

Chairman, Mrs. J. W. Lewis, 5227 West- 
minster Place, St. Louis, Mo. 

Publicity Chairman, Miss Janet Holmes, '19, 
5446 Vernon Avenue, St. Louis. 

National A. H. S. Chairman, Mrs. George 
Gellhorn, '00, 4366 McPherson Avenue, St. 
Louis. 

Chairman St. Louis, Miss Irene Loeb, '18, 
5154 Westminster Place, St. Louis. 
p Secretary St. Louis, Miss Anna R. Dubach, 
'19, 5507 Waterman Avenue, St. Louis. 

Texas Chairman, Mrs. R. P. Caruth, ex-' 13, 
3700 Gilbert Street, Dallas, Texas. 

Kansas Chairman, Mrs. M. L. Adams, 723 
N. 9th Street, Kansas City, Kansas. 



District 11 

arizona, colorado, nebraska, new mexico, 
utah, wyoming 

> Chairman, Mrs. R. C. Campbell, '90, 1075 
Pennsylvania Avenue, Denver, Colorado. 

District 14 

northern california 

^Chairman, Mrs. Frank H. Buck, ex-'13, 
2411 Bowditch Street, Berkeley, Calif. 

President of Bryn Mawr Club, Miss Harriet 
Bradford, '15, Box 833, Stanford University, 
Calif. 

> Secretary of Bryn Mawr Club, Miss Helen 
Lautz, '12, Mills College P. O., Calif. 
^Publicity Chiarman, Mrs. Walter Arnstein, 
ex-'07, 2211 Washington Street, San Francisco, 
Calif. 

> Endowment Committee, Mrs. Jesse Steinhart, 
'02, 2400 Steiner Street, San Francisco; Mrs. 
Bruce Porter, ex-' 10, 944 Chestnut Street, San 
Francisco; Miss Helen Lautz, '12; Ex-officio, 
Mrs. Walter Arnstein, ex-'07; Miss Harriet 
Bradford, '15. 

District 21 

austria, canada, denmark, ecuador, ger- 
many, greece, hawaiian islands, india, 
mexico, scotland, spain, syria, switzer- 
land, turkey, philippine islands, porto 
rico, italy, south america, alaska and 

CUBA 

** Chairman, Miss Fannie Skeer Barber, '09, 
17 St. Luke's Place, New York City. 



MAY DAY WILL BE UNDERGRADUATES' ENDOWMENT GIFT 



The undergraduates' great gift to the Endow- 
ment will be the Old English May Day Fete, to 
be presented at the college on two successive 
days, May 7 and 8. Six Elizabethan plays, 
two masques, a pageant, May pole dances and 
singing will compose the program. 

Mrs. Otis Skinner, playwright and wife of 
the well known actor, will be director-in-chief 
and will coach several of the plays. "Nothing 
could be more beautiful than the May Day 
which I saw in 1906," she said when she agreed 
to direct the fete. "The campus, however, 
gets more beautiful every year. The ivy in the 



cloister is now surpassingly beautiful. There 
is really no college campus like Bryn Mawr for 
an old English May Day." 

Samuel Arthur King, lecturer in English 
diction at Bryn Mawr, will coach the other 
plays. Eleanor Hill Carpenter (Mrs. Rhys 
Carpenter), '16, will be secretary and treasurer 
of the fete. 

Elizabeth Vincent, '23, has been elected 
Queen of the May. As May Queen she will 
take the part of Maid Marian in "Robin 
Hood." Lois Kellogg, '20, is chairman of the 
May Day Committee and takes the part of 



72 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[April 



Robin Hood. The other members are: Helen 
Hill, '21, Cornelia Skinner, '22, Elizabeth 
Bright, '23, Amy Lawrence Martin, '15, and 
Darthela Clark, '20. 

A village green of the time of Queen Eliza- 
beth will be reproduced on the green in front of 
Merion Hall. There the May pole ■will be set 
up and the Queen will be crowned. Morris 
and country dancing and old English games and 
side-shows will go on there all the afternoon, 
while the plays are being given on other parts 
of the campus. 

Yvette Guilbert to Help 

The masque dancing will be coached by 
Monsieur Placido de Montoliu, representative 
of Jacques Dalcroze in the United States — a 
teacher at Bryn Mawr Model School and at 
Yvette Guilbert's school in New York. In- 
deed, Yvette Guilbert is to help him in the 
masque dancing. Jeannette Peabody, '19, 
will coach the morris dancing, and the country 
dancing will be worked up in the gymnasium 
classes. 

CASTS OF PLAYS 

The Saint George Play 

St. George Anne Fraser, '23 

King Alfred Marion Holt, '23 

Queen Clarissa Donnelly, '21 

King William Victoria Evans, '21 

Captain Slasher Anne Taylor, '21 

Giant Aileen Weston, '21 

Little Jack Helen Dunbar, '23 

Turk Alice Rood, '20 

Dragon Katharine Raht, '23 

Doctor Ruth McAneny, '23 

Cast Chairman, Anne Taylor, '21. 

Assistant Coach, Elizabeth Taylor, '21. 

The Old Wives' Tale 

Sacrapant Cornelia Skinner, '22 

Calypha Florence Martin, '23 

Thelea Eleanor Bliss, '21 

Eumenides Katharine Strauss, '23 

Erestus Octavia Howard, '22 

Lampriscus Constance La Boiteaux, '22 

Huanabango Marynia Foot, '2 1 

Corebus Elizabeth Luetkemyer, '20 

Wiggen Emeline Kellogg, '23 

Churchwarden F. Dorothy Stewart, '23 

Sexton Laura Bunch, '23 

Ghost of Jack Elizabeth Kellogg, '21 



Delia Helen Hagen, '23 

Venelia Josephine Fisher, '22 

Zantippe Eleanor Brush, '22 

Celante Miriam Morrison, '21 

Antic Eleanor Hurd, '23 

Frolic Margaret Littell, '20 

Fantastic Jane Burgess, '22 

Clunch Prue Smith, '22 

Madge Elizabeth Hobdy, '22 

f Augusta Howell, '23 

Furies \ Grace Lubin, '21 

[Virginia Corse, '23 

Head in the Well Anne Fitzgerald, '23 

Fiddler Helen Rice, '23 

Cast Chairman, Marynia Foot, '2 1 
Assistant Coach, Helen Hill, '21 

Midsummer Night's Dream 

Theseus Jane Brown, '21 

Lysander Sophie Yarnall, '23 

Demetrius Elizabeth Gray, '23 

Helena Cecile Bolton, '21 

Hermia Elizabeth Scott, '23 

Philostrate Martha Chase, '20 

Quince Passya Ostroff, '21 

Snug Bettina Warburg, '21 

Bottom Dorothy Burr, '23 

Flute Helen Bennett, '21 

Snout Betty Weaver, '20 

Starveling Harriet Holmes, '20 

Hippolyta Anita Dunn, '22 

Oberon Helen Hill, '21 

Titania Miriam Brown, '20 

Puck Serena Hand, '22 

Fairies Children from the Model School 

Cast Chairman, Serena Hand, '22 
Assistant Coach, Alice Harrison, '20 

The Nice Wanton 
(Given by the Graduate Students) 

Delilah Jane Davies 

Ishmael Muriel Barker 

Barnabas Mary Price 

Iniquity Margaret Knapp 

Zantippe Monica Flannery 

Eulalia Frances Penrose 

Worldly Shame Helen Spaulding, '19 

Judge Ruth Woodruff, '19 

Messenger Eleanor Copenhaver 

Prompter Amy Martin, '15 

/Alice Newlin, '18 
Batleys \lstarHaupt,'17 



1920] 



Endowment Gift 



73 



Robin Hood 

Robin Lois Kellogg, '20 

Maid Marian Elizabeth Vincent, '23 

King Richard Alice Harrison, '20 

Prince John Elizabeth Cecil, '21 

Leicester Mabel MacFerran, '23 

Little John Clarinda Garrison, '21 

Scarlet Frances Knox, '23 

Alan-a-Dale Haroldine Humphreys, '23 

Friar Tuck Katharine Peek, '22 

Sheriff Mary Porter Kirkland, '21 

Sir Stephen Virginia Grace, '22 

Bishop Julia Conklin, '20 

Ellen's Father Frances Childs, '23 

Fitzwater Elizabeth Child, '23 

Sir Richard Emily Anderson, '22 

Ellen Ellen Jay, '21 

Cast Chairman, Haroldine Humphreys, '23 
Assistant Coach, Cornelia Skinner, '22 
Robin Hood's Merry Men: Isabel F. Smith, '15; 
Margaret V. Morton, '21; Harriet L. Stevens, 
'22; Anna S. Rupert, '22; Elinor West, '21; 
Elizabeth F. Cope, '21; Katherine Stiles, '22; 
Alice P. Smith, '23; Helen H. M. Stone, '21; 
Elizabeth M. Hall, '22; Agnes R. Clement, 
'23; Frances K. Young, '23; Eleonore D. 
Harris, '21; Jane R. Richards, '23; Frances 
S. Child, '23; Margaret E. Dunn, '23; Mar- 
garetta T. Archbald, '21; and Isabel H. 
Arnold, '20. 
Heralds: Leslie Richardson, '18; Mary S. Gog- 
gin, '21; Margaret B. Spier, '22; Frances 
Matteson, '23; Frances Jones, '21; Elizabeth 
Kales, '21: Katharine M. Townsend, '20; 
and Elizabeth H. Donohue, '22. 

The Masque of Flowers 

Spring Eleanore Boswell, '2x 

Gallus Zella D. Boynton, '20 

Winter Margaret A. Krech, '22 

Silenus Emily Kimbrough, '21 

Kawasha Elinor D. Wheeler, '23 

Minstrel Phoebe Norcross, '22 

Train of Silenus: Frances Bliss, '22, Lois Ben- 
nett, '22; Alice Nicoll, '22; Harriet B. Pratt, 
'23; Louise L. Sloan, '20; and Margaret I. 
Wiesman, '21. 
Train of Kawasha: Eliza J. Pallache, '22; Doro- 
othy B. Allen, '20; Marion L. Frost, '20; 
Dorothy S. Lubin, '21; Esther L. Rhoads, '23; 
and Mary Scott, '19. 
Flowers: Lydia L. Beckwith, '21; Mary Hardy, 
'20; Elizabeth V. Philbrick, '23; Katharine 
Walker, '21; Birdie B. Zilker, '20 and Isa- 
belle Beaudrias, '23. 



Garden Gods: Helen M. M. Zinsser, '20; Eugenia 
B. Sheppard, '21; Valeska H. Wurlitzer, '22; 
and Bower Kelly, '21. 

The Hue and Cry After Cupid 

Venus Elizabeth Taylor, '2 1 

Hymen Elizabeth Titcomb, '22 

Vulcan Margaret H. Ballou, '20 

f Edith Stevens, '20 

Graces { Harriet M. Scribner, '23 

[Loretta Grim: '22 

Priestess Louise Reinhardt, 21 

Priestess' Train: Barbara Clark, '22; Marian 
Gregg, '20; Helen F. Rubel, '21; Dorothy W. 
Smith, '20; Helen Humphreys, '20; Eliza- 
beth A. Jennings, '23; and Mabel S. Kirk- 
bride, '22. 
Cyclopses: Dorothy A. Klenke, '21; and Con- 
stance G. Cameron, '22. 
Zodiac: Mary D. Hay, '22; Alice H. Hay, '23; 
Lilley J. Ireson, '21; Star McDaniel, '23; 
Nancy Jay, '22; Martha J. Lindsey, '20; 
Virginia Park, '20; Anna M. Sanford, '20; 
Emily L. Burns, '22; Henrietta E. Baldwin, 
'21; Olive Floyd, '22; and Eva Jane Latti- 
mer, '21. 

Alumnae Give Play 

The alumnae have chosen to give "The XI 
Pageant of Jephte" as their feature, with the 
following cast: 

Jephte Martha R. White, '03 

Filia Anne Kidder Wilson 

(Mrs. Edmund B. Wilson) '03 

Ammon A. Gertrude Hill, '07 

Ardellio Sophie Boucher, '03 

Burbo Alice Day Jackson 

(Mrs. Percy Jackson), '02 

Mobal F. Maud Dessau, '13 

Legatus Barbara Spoflord Morgan 

(Mrs. Shepard A. Morgan) '09 

Nuncius Emily R. Cross, '01 

Agnes E. Morrow, '12 
Marjorie Cheney, ex-'03 
Elsie M. Gignoux, '02 
Marion Reilly, '01 
Edith Orlady, '02 
v A. Elizabeth White, '01 
Madge Miller, '01 
Madeline Fleischer Wolf 
(Mrs. James S. Wolf), '14 
Beatrice McGeorge, '01 
Frances Ream Kemmerer 
| (Mrs. John Kemmerer), '01 
I Alletta Van Reypen Korff (Bar- 
[ oness Serge Alexander Korff) '00 



Courtiers . 



Hand Maiden i 



74 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[April 



Manager, Elizabeth T. Daly, '01. 

The classes 1917, 1918, and 1919 will serve 
tea on Rockefeller lawn. Lucy Evans Chew 
(Mrs. Samuel Chew), '17, will be in charge. 

Publicity for May Day 

A new feature this year will be the nation- 
wide distribution of posters advertising the 
pageant. Interest in this poster was stimu- 
lated by a prize of $100 given by the Philadel- 
phia Art Alliance for the best design for the 
purpose submitted by a Philadelphia artist. 
It was stipulated that the following words 
should appear upon the designs: "May Day 
Revels and Plays, Given by ye Scollers of Bryn 
Mawr, on ye College Greens, ye 7 and 8 of 
May, Anno Domini 1920." 

The winning poster-design was also used in 
making Bryn Mawr stickers for letters, which 
are being sold at one cent each by Endowment 
workers all over the country. If every Bryn 
Mawr woman uses these attractive stickers 
after the manner of Red Cross Christmas seals, 



the country cannot help realizing that Bryn 
Mawr May Day is an occasion worthy of its- 
attention. 

Photographers are getting to be one of the 
commonest sights on the campus. As early as 
the second week in March they were coming 
out from the city for the sole purpose of getting 
views of the gymnasium classes in the elemen- 
tary stages of practicing their dances. It is 
expected that they will be faithful in attend- 
ance at the rehearsals all through April. On 
the big day itself, — or rather on the big days, — 
several moving-picture cameras will record 
scenes of Bryn Mawr to be released in the 
most remote corners of the country. 

Alumnae Accommodations 

Though it is rather beyond the most opti- 
mistic expectations that there will be room for 
them all, as many alumnae as possible will be 
accommodated in the college halls over May 
Day. Alumnae will be given rooms in the- 
order of sending in their names. 



NEWS FROM THE CAMPUS 



BATES HOUSE BOOM 

Miss Virginia Deems, former head of Bates 
House, and Miss Anne Wiggin, of the Spring 
Street Settlement, were the guests of honor at 
the party which the Christian Association gave 
in the gymnasium Saturday evening, March 6, 
as the inauguration of the $1000 Bates House 
drive. 

Taylor Hall was uniquely decorated with 
red crepe-paper streamers during the week of 
March 8, when the Bates House committee 
used a " follow the red line" scheme to attract 
attention to their subscription booth, where 
red buttons were given to all who subscribed. 

The undergraduates have pledged $13,000 for 
Bates House this year but this sum which was 
fully adequate in 1917 will not be nearly enough 
this year. The cost in 1918 was $1450 and in 
1919, $1600. Besides the increased expense of 
running the house, the supplies of bedding, 
towels, window screens, bathing suits and china 
must be replenished. 

SASSOON'S GIFT POEM 

After speaking at the college on February 6, 
Siegfried Sassoon, the British soldier poet, 



sent to The College News the following hitherto- 
unpublished poem: 

Via Crucis 

Night and rain and misery and blood, — 
Why should soldiers curse them and complain? 
God made both these things before the flood,— 
•Night and rain. 

Maughing crumps and bullets through the 

brain, — 
(Jesus never dreamt there'd be such mud; 
Jesus kept a purpose for this pain.) 

Ay; like stricken hearts we shed our blood, 
Sometimes asking, "Do we die in rain?" 
Night conceals us with a drifting scud, — 
Night and rain. 

The same edition of The News published the 
following poem signed by the initials "B. K. ,J * 
and "K.L.W.":— 

Warning to Soldier Poets 

My friend, if you're a soldier poet 
And wield a skillful pen, 

Go not to Female Institutes- 
Avoid this Lions' den! 



1920] 



News from the Campus 



75 



For when you've read your lecture out, 

They stand you near the wall, 
Where girls file by, shake hands and sigh, 

"He's so divinely tall!" 

Then with an eager hungry look 

They press pens in your hand, 
And thousands say "Please sign this book — 

We think your poems are grand!" 

When you've exhausted all your fund 

Of genteel conversation, 
The group sits still, lost in the thrill 

Of hero-admiration. 

But when it's time to go to bed 

They cannot seem to forego 
Asking you if you like B. M. 

Or stock-yards in Chicago. 

All soldier poets should beware 

Of erudite receptions: 
Some go, and live to tell the tale — 

But these are the exceptions. 

NEW REQUIREMENTS FOR M. A. 

New requirements for the degree of Master 
of Arts were approved by the Academic Council 
on February 10. 

"This degree is open to college graduates who 
shall have satisfied the Graduate Committee 
that their course of study has been equivalent 
to that for which the degree of Bachelor of Arts 
is given at Bryn Mawr College, or that it has 
been adequately supplemented by subsequent 
study. 

"The candidate must attend at Bryn Mawr 
College three seminaries, or their equivalent, 
in graduate courses, unless by the permission of 
the Graduate Committee she is allowed to sub- 
stitute post-major (third or fourth year under- 
graduate) courses for one of the seminaries. 
Preliminary training equivalent to the Bryn 
Mawr College undergraduate major courses in 
the subject of the seminary, or of related sub- 
jects of equal value in preparation, is required 
for admission to a seminary. Each seminary 
requires one-third of the student's time for one 
year. The minimum time in which the work 
can be completed is therefore one year, but the 
work cannot be done in one year unless the can- 
didate is thoroughly prepared in all the subjects 
she offers, and gives her entire time to graduate 
study. 

"The candidate is required to pass with a 
creditable grade written examinations on the 
seminaries or courses offered, such examinations 



to be held in the first week of the May examina- 
tion period. The examination books, together 
with the examiner's estimate, shall be sent to 
the Graduate Committee, which shall report to 
the Academic Council. 

"The degree shall not be given to anyone 
who cannot read French and German, or who is 
unacquainted with Latin. The Graduate Com- 
mittee will provide written examinations in 
French and German twice each year, namely, 
once during the week before Thanksgiving, and 
once during the week before spring vacation. 
Students who have already passed the general 
language examinations of the College in these 
languages may be excused from this require- 
ment. 

"The prospective candidate must register 
with the Graduate Committee during October 
of the academic year in which she intends to 
take her degree, and her statement shall con- 
tain the approval of her courses by her 
instructors." 

PRESIDENT THOMAS IN EGYPT 

President Thomas sailed on February 12 from 
Trieste for Egypt, where she stayed for six 
weeks. The next country she will visit is 
Palestine. Her party, after travelling through 
parts of the Great Desert, spent over a month 
in Paris and the Riviera, making a short stop 
at Monte Carlo. 

MISS BEZANSON LEAVES 

Miss Anne Bezanson, Instructor in Social 
Economy and Social Research for the last two 
years, is leaving Bryn Mawr this spring. She 
is to lecture in Europe this summer. Miss 
Bezanson, who is a Radcliffe alumna, has been 
connected with various industries in an em- 
ployment and advisory capacity, and is gen- 
erally recognized as an authority in this field. 

M. CONS AT COLLEGE 

M. Louis Cons, of Princeton University, 
former Associate in French at Bryn Mawr 
(1911-14), spoke at the college Saturday eve- 
ning, February 28, on his experiences at the 
"Listening Post" during the war. The lecture 
was given under the auspices of the French Club . 

RICHARD NORTON 

The December number of Art and Archaeology 
contains a beautifully illustrated article on 
Richard Norton, formerly a professor at Bryn 
Mawr, written by Francis W. Kelsey of the 



76 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[April 



University of Michigan. Mr. Norton was for 
eight years director of the School of Classical 
Studies in Rome and was in charge of the exca- 
vation of Cyrene. At the opening of the war 
he organized the American Volunteer Motor 
Ambulance Corps. He died on August 2, 1918, 
from an illness which he was unable to throw off 
because of the severe strain of his war work. 

ART CLUB ORGANIZED 

A Bryn Mawr Art Club, for the purpose of 
arousing interest in contemporary art, and with 
membership open to all, was organized on 
February 17. Its members will endeavor to 
appreciate Philadelphia as an art center, and 
will follow up and discuss current exhibitions. 

MAY ENTER OLYMPIC GAMES 

A picked American hockey team may be sent 
by the Philadelphia Hockey League to enter 
the International Woman's Hockey Contest at 
the Olympic Games. The All-Philadelphia 
team has also received a challenge from the All- 
England Women's team to play a match in 
England in the spring, but has not decided 
whether to accept. 

The Olympic Games will be held in Antwerp 
next September for the first time since the war. 
In 1914 they were held in Stockholm. They 



were established for the purpose of affording an 
opportunity for international competition in 
sports that are common to all countries, such as 
hockey, track, tennis, water-polo, swimming 
arid gymnastics. America always enters the 
swimming and track events, but has never sent 
over a hockey team. — The College News. 

SWIMMING RECORDS BROKEN 

Two records were broken and one equaled at 
the Bryn Mawr College Inter-class swimming 
meet January 9. Katherine Woodward of 
Worcester, Mass., won the 136 foot race on 
front by a record of 31 1 seconds, thus bettering 
the time made by Katherine Townsend of 
Boston in 1919 by f seconds Miss Townsend 
equaled her own record of 13 £ seconds for a 
68 foot race on front. 

The time for the four lengths 68 foot relay 
race was cut by 4| seconds by the class of 1921 
with a record of 62 £ seconds. 

Judging of form and fancy dives was done by 
Mr. Phillip Bishop, physical director of Haver- 
ford School. 

The students of the Model School have 
started a fortnightly newspaper and magazine, 
which they have named Scraps and Scribbles. 
Frederica De Laguna, daughter of Dr. Theodore 
De Laguna is the editor-in-chief. 



IN MEMORIAM 



At a special meeting of the Bryn Mawr Club 
of Pittsburgh, February 28, 1920, the following 
minute was adopted, and was directed to be 
put on the records and to be sent to Mr. Bowen 
and to Mr. and Mrs. Hornberger, as an expres- 
sion of sympathy in their bereavement: 

Be it resolved: The Bryn Mawr Club has lost 
in the death of Agnes Warren Hornberger 



Bowen a devoted friend and member, whose 
interest in college and club activities, whose 
energy and constructive ideals were an inspira- 
tion to all her fellow members; and it wishes to 
place on record its high appreciation of her 
qualities of mind and heart which made her a 
strong influence for good among her friends and 
co-workers. 



LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 



MRS. SCOTT CHALLENGED 

To the Editor of the Bryn Mawr Quarterly: 
Since we are embarked on the project of 
raising a large new endowment for Bryn Mawr, 
it would seem that our main task is to convince 
the uninformed and the doubting that the 
college fulfills its task of giving an education. 
Perhaps there is a legitimate difference in opin- 
ion as to what constitutes an education. But it 



would be an extreme academician indeed who 
would deny that in general terms it is some- 
thing which equips its holder to meet with 
open mind and sympathetic understanding the 
problems of the world in which we live, espe- 
cially when, amid the complexities of these 
post-war times, one person's gods are apt to be 
the next person's devils. 

People whose lives are lived and whose work 
is done in the academic field are apt to contend 



1920J 



Letters to the Editor 



77 



that one must not look to any college to equip 
one for work in the social and industrial field. 
Let us grant that; but by all means let us also 
grasp, and as quickly as possible, if we hope 
to convince an awakening world that we 
deserve two million dollars to continue the 
college, that the education it gives must not 
unfit its alumnae to live in the world as it is. 

Amazed at Record 

I am amazed that at this time when the col- 
lege is looking for increased moral and financial 
support, an alumna can publish such a record 
as that of Mrs. Mildred Minturn Scott's re- 
printed from the London Nation in the Quar- 
terly for January. For if Bryn Mawr points 
with pride to " Another Look at New York," 
then Heaven help our professors' chances for 
increased salaries! 

This former New Yorker, it seems, is dis- 
concerted, bewildered and "not a little fright- 
ened" to find that Fifth Avenue has lost its 
atmosphere of the social register and taken on 
that of Ellis Island, flooded with recent immi- 
grants at the down-town end, with immigrants 
a generation old further up town. (This is, I 
think, a fair paraphrase of her description.) 

Assuming that the returned exile sees no 
more profound significance in this phenomenon 
than she expresses, we pass to the conversation 
at lunch in the house where "real American 
women meet and work out schemes of 'social 
uplift' "; here we find that they all resent pay- 
ing to painters, window-cleaners, waitresses, 
cooks, engineers and charwomen their share of 
the increased cost of living — a curiously illog- 
ical position for social uplifters; for many years 
ago, even before the cost of necessaries had 
begun to shoot skywards, the conservative 
charity workers discovered that one of the 
main causes of poverty was underpay. It is 
easy, but fallacious, to say that the cause of the 
increased cost of living for all of us is high 
wages. I note from the Bryn Mawr cata- 
logue that one of Mrs. Scott's majors was polit- 
ical science, so she would hardly fall into that 
error. Yet she seems to find the position of 
these women justified. If that is all the equip- 
ment that a Bryn Mawr training can give one 
with which to meet strange new disconcerting 
phenomena, my confidence in asking people to 
perpetuate Bryn Mawr oozes out at my finger 
tips. 



Attitude Toward Milliner 

But my real case against the reflection Mrs. 
Scott casts upon her Bryn Mawr training is 
patent in her quotations from the colored char- 
woman Mrs. Hennessey, and her attitude 
toward the striking wholesale milliner. The 
latter was on strike for more pay and shorter 
hours in her regular trade, where she had been 
earning $40 to $50 a week and was filling in as 
millinery saleswoman in a retail store at "about 
$20 per." This fills the author with horror 
for apparently three reasons: Because her 
English was bad, because she was but seven- 
teen, and because college professors are paid at 
only a slightly higher rate. 

Did Mrs. Scott's college education, her 
"thirst for information," her general intelli- 
gence, her desire to be fair, none of them lead 
her to inquire how many weeks of the year this 
girl's work lasted, even when eked out by retail 
selling? Had any scholarly motive led her to 
look up the subject she could not have missed 
Mary VanKleeck's Seasonal Industries, a book 
which was published under the aegis of the Rus- 
sell Sage Foundation some years ago. Had she 
preferred a Bryn Mawr author, she could have 
turned to our own Edith Wyatt's Making Both 
Ends Meet (McClures). From these and half 
a dozen other easily accessible sources she 
would have got a graphic picture of the life of 
the wholesale millinery trade before the war: 
the orgies of overwork, the long periods of 
slack time, the pitiful underpay, the frequent 
illegal overtime, the tramping of the streets 
between seasons — a wretched, chaotic industry, 
carrying in its wake demoralization, under- 
nourishment, weakened moral resistance, creat- 
ing and perpetuating bad housing and ill health 
— evils not in the least necessary because we 
wear hats, but because we wear hats irrespon- 
sibly and because the manufacturers have 
calmly taken advantage of our greed for new 
styles. If a course in political science (which 
is, I take it, the precursor of our present eco- 
nomics) is worth paying a professor a living 
wage to teach, then it should turn out students 
with enough humanity and scholarship to con- 
sider these facts and not complain that a tem- 
porary post war inflation is bringing the work- 
ers in such industries an accumulation of back 
pay and independence of spirit which is long 
overdue. 

And as for Mrs. Hennessey's advice to the 
dignified middle-aged dame, who asked if she 



78 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[April 



knew anyone to do the washing, to "go home 
and look in the glass;" and the colored char- 
woman who would not climb a ladder because 
she was so hefty, and who saw she would not 
suit though "no offence taken or meant;" one 
can only bear in mind that the world has spent 
millions of young lives and billions of dollars 
warring for democracy. Citizens of this coun- 
try, including the charwomen and the Mrs. 
Hennesseys, have invested millions in Liberty 
bonds to keep the Hun from our door and pro- 
tect our American tradition that all men are 
created equal. So if a sense of justice cannot 
hold in check our indignation when members of 
the so-called working classes accept literally 
the significance of the war and undertake to 
enjoy an equality they have never before 
exercised, a reasonably developed sense of 
humor ought to be able to bridge the gap. 

Now as to the disconcerting symptoms which 
are manifesting themselves among that con- 
stituency of individuals, painters, cooks, sales- 
women and the like from whom, before the war, 
we were accustomed to receive reasonably 
docile services at (usually) less than reasonable 
wages, nothing in the foregoing need be con- 
strued as indicating that those who hold with 
me against Mrs. Scott in the matter of what 
constitutes a creditably scholarly attitude in 
the premises, are a whit less inconvenienced 
by the present shortage and high price of labor 
than anyone else. 

But there are certain fallacious assumptions 
and methods of mistaking things which have 
always been so, for things which are as they 
should be, out of which the war jarred all of 
us, errors which it ill behooves college women 
to slip back into if they want to demonstrate 
the value of a college education. For instance, 
thousands of women in this country learned to 
do without any domestic help at all for the 
first time during the war. Women who boasted 
no service flags in the window, women who 
suffered only from the by products of war such 
as shortage of labor and materials, look back on 
those months with horror if they dare look 
back upon them at all. I am not referring to 
the sock knitters, and the Red Cross workers, 
to the people who lived in houses they owned 
and from which they could not be evicted, and 
who were free to go to restaurants to meals 
when there was no cook. I am referring to the 
women with young children or old people or 
invalids to guard, where doing all the work of 
the household meant a twelve to fourteen hour 
day everyday, cooking, washing, ironing, cleaning, 



mending, circumventing the sugar shortage, the 
rice and the potato shortage, doing at times 
without ice, at other times without electricity, 
without gas, sometimes without water; when 
the milk deliveries were uncertain, the food 
from the market stale, when leases fell due and 
landlords would not renew, when night time was 
dedicated to nerve racking worry, not to sleep, 
when some of the family came down with 
influenza and doctors and nurses almost did not 
exist; when the woman took her influenza 
standing up and silent, adding the shoveling of 
the snow and stoking of the furnace to her 
other chores. These women know the stern 
implications of a labor shortage, and if there is 
any virtue at all in the training of the mind, it 
would lead one, after such experience, to 
divide for the rest of her life the essential serv- 
ices from the arbitrary ones. 

Can College Teach Sympathy? 

Is it too much to expect of a college training 
that it should also teach, taken together with a 
world war, an understanding, an active, even a 
militant sympathy with all men and women in 
all walks in life who are carrying heavier burdens 
in the way of over work and under pay than 
any individual should be asked to carry? 

And now that those who do the world's 
physical labor are demanding a profound read- 
justment of their share of the award, what part 
in the proceedings are the alumnae of Bryn 
Mawr going to take? Are they going to expend 
their energies on querulous complaints at the 
inconveniences and dangers confronting their 
own class? Or are they going to make an 
effective demonstration of the value of giving 
the college a new lease of life by showing them- 
selves in every community as belonging to the 
group which is actively groping, using all the 
vision, foresight and mental integrity it can 
muster, for the fair and logical answer? 

As for Mrs. Scott's last point, her references 
to the underpaid professors, here at last is com- 
mon ground. Today there is probably no room 
for differing opinions; teachers in schools and 
colleges are underpaid, and the result is a detri- 
ment to the community which cannot endure; 
we must have adequately paid teachers in 
schools and colleges both. 

But let us, by our hope of success in our own 
campaign, put it on a basis more generous, more 
dignified, and more scholarly, than a comparison 
with the present inflation in the wages paid to 
unskilled workers and to the trades. 

Constance Leupp Todd, 1903. 
Somerset, Chevy Chase, D. C. 



1920] 



News from the Classes 



79 



CHRISTINE AT BRYN MAWR 

When I was ten years old my father took me 
to Miss Mary E. Stevens' School in German- 
town. Georgie — what Stevens girl can ever 
forget Georgie! — led us up a long flight of stairs 
and into a room containing a bed and many, 
many books. Chairs were placed beside Miss 
Stevens' invalid-chair and we sat down. My 
father began at once: "Here is a little Bryn 
Mawr woman." His voice was very serious. 
Miss Stevens' mouth was grave but her eyes 
smiled. 

A few months after that my father died. 
Miss Stevens and my mother and I had a sacred 
duty to perform. I must go to Bryn Mawr. 
"Here is a little Bryn Mawr woman" — in- 
fluenced my whole life. 

It is eleven years since I was married and 
went abroad to live. This year was my first 
chance to go to a meeting of the Alumnae Asso- 



ciation. In making my plans I decided to take 
my eldest daughter, Christine, with me. Chris- 
tine is ten years old. I wanted her to be like 
Mrs. Wiggs' dahlias — to know what she was 
going to be "before she growed." First a gen- 
eral view of the campus, from an automobile. 
Then, I took her into Taylor. Then Pembroke. 

On Sunday afternoon she passed salted 
almonds around at Miss Taft's tea-party. She 
had a talk with Dr. Wheeler. He told her about 
Bryn Mawr. In conclusion he said, "But you 
mustn't think you've seen it yet — most of it is 
covered up with snow." 

On the way home I asked Christine what she 
thought of it all. "It is nice," she answered, 
"because it is in the country and I like the bed- 
rooms in Pembroke but I want to see other 
colleges before I decide." 

Now I am waiting for May-Day! 

Helen Davenport Gibbons. 



NEWS FROM THE CLASSES 



Ph.D's 

Marion Bills, Ph.D., Bryn Mawr, '17, is 
research assistant, Bureau of Personnel, Car- 
negie Institute of Technology in Pittsburgh. 

Helen Cox Bowerman, Ph.D., Bryn Mawr, 
1912, is education secretary, Diocese of Kansas. 
Bishop's House, Topeka, Kans. 

Carrie A. Harper, professor of English, Mount 
Holyoke College, and Ph.D. in English, Bryn 
Mawr in 1910, died on December 14 in the 
Franklin County Hospital, in Greenfield, Mass. 

1889 
Class editor, Mrs. Frank H. Simpson, Over- 
look, College Hill, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

1890 
Class editor, Miss Katherine Shipley, Bryn 
Mawr, Pa. 

Margaret Patterson Campbell (Mrs. Richard 
Campbell) is chairman for Colorado, Wyoming, 
Arizona, Utah, Nebraska and New Mexico, for 
the Endowment. 

1891 

Class editor, Miss Maria Voorhees Bedinger, 
Anchorage, Ky. 

Constance Lynch Springer, who was a grad- 
uate in Biology last year at Bryn Mawr, is now 
studying medicine at John Hopkins University. 
Miss Springer is a daughter of Gertrude Lynch 
Springer (Mrs. Ruter W. Springer) ex-'91. 



Helen Annan Scribner (Mrs. Arthur Scribner) 
is chairman of the Endowment Committee on 
Potential Donors for New York State. 

1892 

Class editor, Mrs. Frederick M. Ives, Dingle 
Ridge Farm, Brewster, N. Y. 

Elizabeth M. Carroll has adopted a fifteen 
year old French boy whose father, an officer, 
was killed in the first year of the war. 

Mary T. Mason is doing case work for the 
Society for Organizing Charity in Philadelphia. 

Edith Rockwell Hall has been working for the 
last year as field agent of the Womens' Service 
Section of the Division of Labor of the Central 
Railroad Administration. She returned in 
March from a trip which took her as far as 
Salt Lake City investigating the condition of 
women cleaning cars and working in railroad 
restaurants. 

1893 

Class editor, Miss S. Frances Van Kirk, 1333 
Pine Street, Philadelphia, Penna. 

Grace Elder Saunders (Mrs. Frederick 
Saunders) has moved to 7 Waterhouse Street, 
Cambridge for the winter. Her husband is in 
the department of Physics at Harvard and she 
is doing private tutoring in Mathematics. Her 
daughter is beginning her preparation for 
Bryn Mawr. 



80 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[April 



Evangeline Walker Andrews (Mrs. Charles 
Andrews) is chairman for New Haven for the 
Endowment. 

Helen Hopkins Thorn (Mrs. H. R. Thorn) is 
at the head of a Community Service Organiza- 
tion in Baltimore which has recently started a 
community kitchen, serving hot dinners for 
85 cents. 

Lucy Lewis is on one of the teams working to 
get an endowment for the Anna Howard Shaw 
Chair of Preventive Medicine at the Woman's 
Medical College, Philadelphia. 

Gertrude Taylor Slaughter (Mrs. Moses 
Slaughter) has returned to this country after 
two years of work among the Italian refugee 
children. Among the honors awarded Mrs. 
Slaughter for her work are a brooch representing 
the ancient shield of Venice, awarded her by 
the City of Venice; a silver medal from the 
Italian Red Cross, and the White Cross of 
Savoy, a souvenir of the Duke of Aosta's army 
which protected Venice. 

Mrs. Slaughter has an article on D'Annunzio 
and Italy in the January "Atlantic." She has 
had several articles in the last year both in the 
"Atlantic" and the "North American Review.' 

1894 

Class editor, Mrs. R. N. Durfee, 19 Highland 
Avenue, Fall River, Mass. 

Fay MacCracken Stockwell (Mrs. Frederick 
E. Stockwell) '94 is spending the winter with 
her mother in Winter Park, Florida. 

Emily Martin, Professor of Mathematics at 
Mt. Holyoke College, has been appointed secre- 
tary of the Mount Holyoke branch of the Asso- 
ciation of University Professors. 

Helen Middleton Smith (Mrs. Thomas Smith) 
has moved to Boston, where her husband is a 
professor in the Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology. 

Emma Bailey Speer (Mrs. Robert E. Speer), 
is honorary chairman of New Jersey for the 
Endowment. 

Katherine Porter returned from a four years' 
stay in China and Japan in time for the 25 th 
Anniversary of her class. While in the Orient, 
she taught in the Women's Medical School at 
Pekin. She is now at Cornell University, as 
one of the Medical Advisors of women. 

Abby Brayton Durfee (Mrs. Randall N. 
Durfee), is sub-chairman for South-Eastern 
Massachusetts of the Bryn Mawr Endowment 
Campaign. She attended the Alumnae Annual 
Meeting in February. 



1895 

Class editor, Miss Mary F. Ellis, 2505 South 
Lambert Street, Philadelphia, Penna. 

Anna West has a daughter, Elinor, who is a 
Junior at Bryn Mawr. 

1896 

Class editor, Miss Mary W. Jewett, Moravia, 
N. Y. 

Leila Verplanck North died on January 23 at 
Clifton Springs, N. Y. 

Elizabeth Kirkbride is chairman for Pennsyl- 
vania and Delaware for the Endowment. 

Cora Baird Jeanes (Mrs. Henry Jeanes) is 
chairman of the committee on estimates for 
Philadelphia. 

Elizabeth Hopkins Johnson (Mrs. Hobart 
Johnson) is chairman for Wisconsin. 

Elsa Bowman flew in a Handley-Page from 
London to France. They got lost in the fog, 
and had to make a forced landing 70 miles from 
Paris. She is working at Laon in the devas- 
tated region, where she has been since last July. 
1897 

Class editor, Miss Mary M. Campbell, Walker 
Road, West Orange, N. J. 

Julia Duke Henning (Mrs. Samuel Henning) 
is chairman for North Carolina, South Carolina, 
Georgia, Florida, Kentucky, Tennessee, Louis- 
iana and Mississippi for the Endowment Fund. 

Susan Follansbee Hibbard (Mrs. William 
Hibbard) is chairman for Illinois, Minnesota, 
Wisconsin and Iowa. 

Mary M. Campbell is not going around the 
world as she had planned, on account of the 
illness of her father. 

For the first time in history the Iowa delega- 
tion to the Democratic National Convention 
will include a woman in its membership. This 
delegate Mali be Anna B. Lawther. 

1898 

Class editor, Mrs. Wilfred Bancroft, Harris- 
ville, R. I. 

Alice Gannett is chairman for Cleveland. 

.Grace Clarke Wright (Mrs. Vernon Wright) 
is chairman for Minnesota. 

1899 

Class editor, Mrs. Edward II. Waring, 47 
Woolton Road, Essex Falls, N. J. 

Mary Towle is chairman of the legislative 
committee, Women Lawyers' Association. 

Amy Steiner is chairman for Maryland, Dis- 
trict of Columbia, Virginia and West Virginia, 
for the Endowment. 



1920] 



News from the Classes 



81 



Ellen Kilpatrick is vice chairman for the same 
district. 

Frances Keay Ballard is librarian to a firm 
of admiralty lawyers in New York City. 

Evelyn Lawther Odell (Mrs. Owen Davis 
Odell) died on January 25 after a long illness. 
She is survived by her husband, The Rev. 
Owen Davis Odell of Indianapolis, and one son 
and two daughters. 

The following members of '99 attended the 
Alumnae Meeting: Amy Steiner, regional 
chairman for Maryland, Virginia, West Virginia, 
and the District of Columbia; Ellen Kilpatrick; 
Katherine Middendorf Blackwell, chairman for 
Trenton; Sylvia Scudder Bowditch, chairman for 
Boston; Gertrude Ely, chairman for Philadel- 
phia. May Schoneman Sax, Dr. Mary N. 
Brown, and Emma Guffey Miller were also 
present, the latter is directing the endowment 
campaign in Pittsburgh. 

Sibyl Hibbard Darlington (Mrs. Herbert 
Seymour Darlington) is spending the winter 
in California. 

May Lautz Sutliff (Mrs. Edward Milton 
Sutliff) is travelling in Japan where her husband 
has business interests. 

Caroline Browne Lewis (Mrs. Herbert Radnor 
Lewis) has been officially "screened" as one 
of the twelve successful business women in 
America. She is fashion and advertising man- 
ager for the Mallinson Silk Company of N. Y. 

Emma Guffey Miller has recently purchased 
a farm fifty miles north of Pittsburgh as a 
summer place. After June 15 her summer 
address will be Wolf Creek Farm, Slippery 
Rock, Penna. 

Sylvia Scudder Bowditch (Mrs. Ingersoll 
Bowditch) is chairman for Massachusetts for 
the Endowment. 

1900 

Class editor, Miss Mary Helen MacCoy, 
care American Red Cross, 108 Massachusetts 
Avenue, Boston, Mass. 

"It was almost a Bryn Mawr reunion of the 
class of 1900 or 1901 when Miss Anne Lawther 
of Iowa, Miss Julia Landers of Indiana and 
Mrs. Susan Walker Fitzgerald of Massachusetts 
met in the Shoreham Hotel in Washington 
today at the get-together gathering of the Demo- 
cratic national committee women. The three 
women were classmates at Bryn Mawr, and had 
not met since their college days until they 
found themselves greeting one another today 
as committeewomen from their respective 
states." — The Philadelphia Public Ledger. 



Grace Latimer Jones has organized a new 
club in Indianapolis, the Crichton Club, which 
is similar to the contemporary Clubs in other 
cities. It has a membership of 600. 

Cornelia Halsey Kellogg (Mrs. Frederic 
Kellogg) is chairman of Central New Jersey for 
the Endowment. 

Edith Wright is secretary and treasurer of 
the Michigan Endowment Committee. 

Helen MacCoy is a Red Cross worker in 
Rutland, Mass., where there are a number of 
tubercular ex-service men. She writes that 
it is a little village on a hilltop and they have 
had three blizzards in a month. 

Edna Fischel Gellhorn, '00 (Mrs. George 
Gellhorn), declined to run for president of the 
National League of Women Voters because of 
her four young children. Mrs. Gellhorn was 
elected vice president of the League and is 
chairman of the Anna Howard Shaw Memorial 
at Bryn Mawr college. 

Maud Lowrey Jenks (Mrs. Robert D. Jenks) 
is working in the national office of the Bryn 
Mawr Endowment as chairman of the speakers' 
bureau. 

Edith Wright is secretary of the Michigan 
committee for the Endowment. 

Edith Crane Lanham (Mrs. Samuel T. 
Lanham) is on the southern committee for the 
Bryn Mawr Endowment. She is working in 
South Carolina. 

Cornelia Halsey Kellogg (Mrs. Frederic R. 
Kellogg) is chairman of the New Jersey com- 
mittee for the Endowment. 

Bertha Phillips is teaching history in the 
Mary Lyon School in Swarthmore, Penna. 
1901 

Class editor, Miss Marion Reilly, 2015 De- 
Lancey Place, Philadelphia, Penna. 

Marion Reilly is chairman for General Can- 
vassing for Philadelphia and vicinity. 

Marianna Buffum Hill (Mrs. Perry Hill) is 
chairman for Michigan for the Endowment. 

Marion Wright Messimer (Mrs. Robert 
Messimer) is chairman for Detroit. 
1902 

Class editor, Mrs. T. D. Howe, 154 Beacon 
Street, Boston, Mass. 

Marguerite Allen is district secretary of the 
Brooklyn Bureau of Charities this winter. 

Helen Trimble is teaching Latin at the 
Radnor High School, Wayne, this winter. 

Anne H. Todd is chairman of the Endow- 
ment Committee on Potential Donors for 
Philadelphia and vicinity. 



82 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[April 



Anne Rotan Howe (Mrs. Thorndike Howe) 
is a vice chairman of the National Committee. 

Eleanor James is a teacher and research 
worker at John Wanamaker's in Philadelphia. 

1903 

Class editor, Mrs. H. K. Smith, Farmington, 
Conn. 

Therese Coles Tyler, ex-'03, (Mrs. George 
Trotter Tyler) died on January 24. 

Anna Branson Hillyard (Mrs. Brame Hill- 
yard) has an article in the North American 
Review for January, "I Discover the New 
Testament." Another article, "American 
Written Here," which appeared in the London 
Athenaeum, December 19, has been reprinted 
in The Living Age for January 24. Mrs. Hill- 
yard is living at 20 Cliff Parade, Leigh-on-Sea, 
England. 

Ruth Strong Strong (Mrs. Samuel Strong) 
is chairman for Ohio for the Endowment. 

Gertrude Dietrich Smith (Mrs. Herbert 
Knox Smith) is chairman for Hartford and 
acting chairman for Connecticut for the Endow- 
ment. 

Marjorie Green Mulock (Mrs. Edwin Mu- 
iock) is state organizer for Michigan for the 
Endowment. 

1904 

Class editor, Miss Emma O. Thompson, 506 
South 48th Street, Philadelphia. 

Marion Scott is studying at Radcliffe this 
winter. 

Maud Temple is studying at Columbia this 
year. 

Helen Howell Moorhead (Mrs. J. J. Moor- 
head) is chairman of the speakers' bureau for 
the New York district for the Endowment. 

Mary W. Cameron is president of the Tucson 
Merchandise and Transfer Company and Ari- 
zona Fuel and Supply Company, Tucson, Ariz. 

1905 

Class editor, Mrs. Ellsworth Huntington, 650 
Canton Avenue, Milton, Mass. 

Clara Denison Swan (Mrs. Henry Swan) is 
vice chairman for Denver for the Endowment. 

Louise Marshall Mallery (Mrs. Otto Tod 
Mallery) has a son, born November 26. 

Rachel Brewer Huntington (Mrs. Ellsworth 
Huntington) has a son, Charles Ellsworth, 
born December 8. 

1906 

Class editor, Mrs. Edward W. Sturdevant, 
1627 Sixteenth Street, Washington, D. C. 



Elsie Biglovv Barber (Mrs. St. George Barber) 
is one of the managers of the Annapolis Hos- 
pital. 

Louise Fleischmann Maclay (Mrs. A. B. 
Maclay) is chairman for New York Connecti- 
cut and New Jersey for the Endowment. 

Anna Louise Strong is leading editorial and 
special writer for the Seattle Daily Union 
Record. As a "Red Revolutionist" she has 
brought down upon herself the anger of Mayor 
Ole Hanson. 

Helen Davenport Gibbons (Mrs. Herbert 
Gibbons) is chairman for southern New Jersey. 

Catharine Anderson is publicity chairman for 
Cincinnati. 

Katharine Gano's mother died last spring. 

Grace Neilson LaCoste (Mrs. Charles J. 
LaCoste) spent last summer in America visit- 
ing her relatives. She returned to England in 
the fall. 

1907 

Class editor, Mrs. R. E. Apthorp, 8 Carpenter 
Street, Salem, Mass. 

Margaret Ayer Barnes (Mrs. Cecil Barnes) 
has returned to Chicago after two years resi- 
dence in Washington, D. C. 

Ellen Thayer is living in Baltimore studying 
for a Ph.D. degree at Johns Hopkins. 

Julie Benjamin Howson (Mrs. Roger How- 
son) is now living on Beekman Place over- 
looking the East River in New York. She has 
recently bought a summer cottage at Silver- 
mine, near Norwalk, Conn. 

Margaret Ayer Barnes is the Vice-chairman 
and Harriot Houghteling the Treasurer of the 
Chicago Bryn Mawr Endowment Campaign 
Committee. Cornelia Lynde Meigs has been 
appointed State-chairman of Iowa. 

Harriot Houghteling has an illustrated 
article on Bryn Mawr and the New Era in the 
January number of Fashion-Art, a Chicago 
magazine. Miss Houghteling is secretary and 
treasurer of the Chicago Endowment Fund 
Committee. 

Marie Wing is state organizer for Ohio for 
the Endowment. 

Eunice Schenck spoke before the Alliance 
Francais in Springfield, Mass., on March 5. 

Grace Hutchins, at present teacher of New 
Testament at the New York Training School 
for Deaconesses, has been appointed secretary 
for college student work under the Presiding 
Bishop and Council of the Episcopal Church 
and has accepted the appointment. Grace 
Hutchins and Harriot Houghteling, ex-'07, as 



1920] 



News from the Classes 



83 



well as Laurette Eustis Potts Pease (Mrs. L. 
Frederic Pease), '96, and Margaret Hobart '11, 
are members of the national committee of 
women of the Episcopal Church known as the 
National Committee of the Church Service 
League. 

Harriet Seaver Macomber (Mrs. Donald 
Macomber) has a daughter about two months 
old. 

1908 

Class editor, Mrs. William H. Best, 1198 
Bushwick Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Mildred Bishop is secretary of the National 
Civic Federation in New York City. 

Olive Kelley Craig (Mrs. George Craig) is 
1908's new class collector. 

Mollie Kinsley Best (Mrs. William Best) 
has made $50 for the Endowment Fund by 
soliciting magazine subscriptions from Bryn 
Mawr women and their friends. She takes 
both new subscriptions and renewals. Checks 
and money orders may be sent to her at 1198 
Bushwick Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Ina Richter has completed her interneship at 
Johns Hopkins and has opened an office at 240 
Stockton Street, San Francisco. 

Caroline Schock Jones (Mrs. Chester Lloyd 
Jones) is in Madrid, where her husband is 
attached to the American Embassy. 

Marjorie Young has been appointed to the 
Massachusetts Republican State Committee. 

Miss Young is publicity manager for the 
Endowment Fund in New England. Members 
of 1908 working with her are Dorothy Dalzell, 
Madeleine Fauvre Wiles (Mrs. Thomas Wiles), 
Rachel Moore Warren (Mrs. Henry Warren) 
and Louise Pettibone Smith. 

Mr. Proudfit, father of Josephine Proudfit 
Montgomery (Mrs. Dudley Montgomery), died 
December 23. 

Jacqueline Morris Evans (Mrs. Edward 
Evans), has a fifth child, Christopher, born 
December 31. 

Martha Plaisted Sax is a special writer for 
Reconstruction Publicity. 

Louise Pettibone Smith is instructor in Bib- 
lical Literature at Wellesley College. 

Elizabeth Foster is instructor in Spanish at 
Smith College, where she has recently passed 
her examinations for a Ph.D. degree. 

Anna Carrere is studying landscape archi- 
tecture in Cambridge this winter. 

Madeleine Fauvre Wiles (Mrs. Thomas 
Wiles) has organized and become first president 



of the North Cohasset Woman's Club, an out- 
growth of a club which did war work. 

Adda Eldredge was admitted to the State 
Bar of Michigan in 1919. 

Mabel Frehafer is assistant physicist in the 
Bureau of Standards, Washington, D. C. 

Those present at the reunion luncheon in 
Pembroke on Alumnae day were: Adelaide 
Case, Agnes Goldman, Edith Chambers Rhoads 
(Mrs. Joseph Rhoads), Grace Woodelton, 
Margaret Kent, Elizabeth Crawford Sensenig 
(Mrs. Wayne Sensenig), Helen North Hunter 
(Mrs. Robert J. Hunter), and Mollie Kinsley 
Best (Mrs. Wm. H. Best). Myra Elliot 
Vauclain (Mrs. Jacques Vauclain), and Olive 
Kelley Craig (Mrs. George C. Craig), who were 
to be hostesses, were both ill with influenza. 

Helen Cadbury Bush (Mrs. A. P. Bush, Jr.) 
appeared in time for supper in the Gymnasium. 

Evelyn Gardner is associate principal of the 
High School, Pacific Grove, California. 

Eleanor Rambo is Instructor in Greek at 
Smith College. 

Nellie Seeds Nearing (Mrs. Scott Nearing) 
has been tutoring in the Finch School, New 
York City. 

Mildred Bishop is secretary of the National 
Civic Federation, New York City. She is 
living at the Bryn Mawr Club. 

Margaret Maynard is assistant cashier of 
the MacArthur Concrete Pile and Foundation 
Co., Nyack, N. Y. 

Anna King is Executive Secretary, Home 
Service Section, Boston Metropolitan Chapter 
of the American Red Cross. 

Caroline Schock Jones (Mrs. Chester Lloyd 
Jones) is in Madrid, where her husband is 
Commercial Attache of the American Embassy. 
They were both recently presented to the King 
and Queen of Spain. 

C. Jeannette Griffith is Director of the Re- 
search Department, Duffy Powers Company, 
Rochester, N. Y. 

Margaret Duncan Miller (Mrs. G. F. Miller) 
is Instructor in French at West Virginia Wes- 
leyan College. 

Fanny May Witherspoon is Executive Secre- 
tary of the Peoples Union, New York City. 

Emily Fox is Director and Volunteer, Phila- 
delphia Society for Organizing Charity. She 
is also an enthusiastic student of landscape 
gardening. 

Adelaide Case is Assistant in Religious Edu- 
cation at Teachers College, Columbia University. 



84 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[April 



Magel Frehafer's thesis for her doctorate will 
appear in an early issue of The Physical Re- 
view. It is entitled "The Reflection and Trans- 
mission of Ultra-Violet Light by Sodium and 
Potassium." 

1909 

Class editor, Mrs. Anson Cameron, 125 East 
Elm Street, Chicago, 111. 

Mary Goodwin Storrs (Mrs. Charles L. 
Storrs), has a furlough this year from her mis- 
sionary work at Shaowu, Fukien, China. She 
expects to be in Philadelphia much of the time. 

Georgina Biddle is a social worker for the 
Red Cross Home Service in New York. 

Shirley Putnam is editor of the Greenwich 
Review, a Greenwich weekly paper. She is also 
in charge of the print shop connected with the 
paper. 

Erma Brandenstein Arnstein (Mrs. Hugo 
Arnstein) is publicity chairman for Northern 
California for the Endowment. 

Barbara Spofford Morgan (Mrs. Shepard 
Morgan) is chairman on estimates for the 
New York district for the Endowment. 

Elise Donaldson is assistant educational 
director of the United States Public Health 
Service, Washington, D. C. 

1910 

Class editor, Mrs. H., B. Van Dyne, Troy, 
Penna. 

Emily Howson is teaching at Roland Park 
Country School this winter and taking grad- 
uate courses at Johns Hopkins University. 

Millicent Pond is head of the department of 
female employment at the Winchester Repeat- 
ing Arms Company, in New Haven, Conn. 

Louise Merrill was married on December 26 
to Robert R. Bennett, of Kansas City. ' 

Mary Doheny Dougherty (Mrs. E. J. Dough- 
erty) died last April of influenza-pneumonia, 
contracted in childbirth. Her baby also died. 

Mary B. Shipley was married on September 6 
to John Samuel Mills of China. They are in 
Haverford for the present. 

Henrietta Sharp is the Acting Head Teacher 
in the Walnut Lane School, Philadelphia. 

1911 

Class editor, Miss Margaret J. Hobart, The 
Churchman 381 Fourth Avenue, New York 
City. 

May Egan Stokes (Mrs. Stogdell Stokes) is 
on the Endowment Publicity Committee for 
Philadelphia. 



Helen Marguerite Ramsey was married 
December 8 to William Lavelle Nasmyth in 
Rosemont, Pa. They are living in Puyallup, 
Washington. 

Margaret Hobart has been elected a member 
of the newly formed National Council of 
Women of the Episcopal Church. 

Harriet Couch, (Mrs. Robert Coombs) has a 
son, Robert Duncan Coombs, born last October. 

Helen Parkhurst read a paper before the 
American Philosophical Society recently at its 
meeting in Ithaca on "Imagist Beauty." She 
was delegated to write up the proceedings of 
the meetings for the Journal of Philosophy, 
Psychology and Scientific Methods. She has an 
article entitled "Platonic Pluralism in Aes- 
thetics" in the September Philosophical Review 
and a review of Marshall's Mind and Conduct 
in a later issue. The International Journal of 
Ethics has accepted an article of hers called 
"Evolution of Mastery" which will be pub- 
lished in the spring. She is teaching a course 
on Platonic Realism in the graduate school at 
Columbia besides giving her regular under- 
graduate courses at Barnard. In collaboration 
with Professor Montague, head of the depart- 
ment, Miss Parkhurst has just published a 
syllabus for the Undergraduate philosophical 
course. 

Leila Houghteling is superintendent Hay- 
market District of the United Charities of 
Chicago with a staff of several workers, includ- 
ing one Italian field worker. Miss Houghteling 
has made two flying trips East lately in the 
interests of the Endowment Fund campaign. 

Isobel Rogers has announced her engagement 
to Mr. Frank E. Kruesi. The wedding is 
planned for April 24, and will be a small house 
wedding followed by a reception. Mr. Kruesi 
will take his bride to Seattle to live. 

Agnes Wood Rupp (Mrs. David Rupp) is 
traveling in South America this winter. 

Elsie Funkhouser is chief clerk in the Bureau 
of Contract Adjustments in the War Depart- 
ment in Washington. 

Charlotte Claflin is a member of the staff of 
the educational department of the Pennsylvania 
and Delaware Division of the American Red 
Cross with headquarters in Philadelphia. 

Ruth Tanner is living in New York this 
winter. 

Ruth Vickery Holmes (Mrs. Bradford B. 
Holmes) has moved to New York since her 
husband has taken a position there. She has 



1920] 



News from the Classes 



85 



just settled herself, husband and three chil- 
dren into an apartment at 3089 Broadway. 

Agnes Murray is associate director Bureau 
of Field Service, American Red Cross, Wash- 
ington. She has recently visited her sister, 
Marjorie Murray, '13, who is studying medi- 
cine in New York. (Dept. of Civilian Relief, 
American Red Cross, Washington, D. C.) 

Helen Emerson is studying apple culture at 
Amherst College. (162 Blackstone Boulevard, 
Providence, R. I.) 

Alice Channing is living in New York this 
winter, at the Old Chelsea, West Twenty-third 
Street. 

Margaret Dulles Edwards (Mrs. Deane 
Edwards) is living in Bronxville, New York. 

Mollie Kilner Wheeler (Mrs. Wm. S. Wheeler) 
has a daughter, born in October. 

Margery Hoffman Smith (Mrs. Ferdinand 
C. Smith) writes that her children have furry 
backs and long tails and that she is living in a 
house on a hill outside of Portland, Oregon. 

Ruth Wells is studying in Chicago to fit her- 
self for social welfare research work. 

1912 

Class editor, Mrs. John A. MacDonald, 3227 
North Pennsylvania Street, Indianapolis, Ind. 

Margaret Corwin has been elected editor of 
the 1912 Bulletin for 1920. 

Agnes Morrow has been working throughout 
Virginia as campaign manager for the Y. W. 
C. A. 

Gladys Spry has gone to Palm Beach for 
two months. 

Rev. and Mrs. Edwin Lane (Mary Alden 
Lane) have left Philadelphia temporarily for a 
year's stay in Los Angeles, Cal. 

Catherine Arthurs, who has been teaching in 
the X rue Light Seminary of Canton, China, is 
at home on furlough. 

Helen Lautz has been elected secretary of the 
Bryn Mawr Club of Northern California. 

Mary Peirce is chairman of canvassing com- 
mittee for Philadelphia and vicinity for the 
Endowment. 

Julia Haines MacDonald (Mrs. J. A. Mac- 
Donald) is Endowment publicity chairman for 
Indiana. 

Mary Gertrude Fendall has resigned as 
treasurer of the National Woman's Party and 
gone into industrial work. 

Christine Hammer is Head Mistress of the 
Wyndcroft School in Pottstown. 



Marjorie Walter (Mrs. Howard L. Goodhart) 
died at her home in New York on February 5. 
Mrs. Goodhart was the mother of 1912's class 
baby. 

1913 \ 

Class editor, Nathalie Swift, 130 East 67th 
Street, New York City. 

Ruth Manchester is a teacher of history and 
Latin at the Isabello Thoburn College, Luck- 
now, India, this year. 

Marguerite Bartlett is principal of the Har- 
cum school at Bryn Mawr this year. 

Mary Van Arsdale Tongue was married on 
December 31 to Mr. Ferdinand Eberstadt of 
East Orange. Miss Tongue went overseas 
with the first Red Cross unit. Mr. Eberstadt 
was graduated in 1913 from Princeton, served 
in Squadron A on the Mexican border and 
was a captain in the 304th Field Artillery in 
France. After a cruise through the West 
Indies, Mr. and Mrs. Eberstadt will make their 
home at 18 Beekman Place, New York City 

Aida Barnes Parker (Mrs. Folsom Parker 
has a daughter, born last month. Mrs. Parker's 
address is Fort Jay, Governor's Island, New 
York. 

Marguerite Mellen Dewey (Mrs. Bradley 
Dewey) has a daughter, Marguerite, born in 
December. 

Rose Mabon Davis (Mrs. Thomas Davis), 
has a son, William Mabon Davis, born in 
December. 

Gwendolyn Rawson is chairman for Cincin- 
nati for the Endowment. 

Olga Kelly is chairman for Maryland. 

Margaret Blaine is chairman for the New 
England district for the Endowment. 

Yvonne Stoddard Hayes (Mrs. Henry 
Hayes) is chairman for New York state. 

Maude Dessau is assistant treasurer in the 
firm of Melchior & Dessau, exporters, New 
York. 

Beatrice Nathans Churchward is an actress 
with the Scibilia Producing Company. 

Jessie Buchanan is a member of the law firm 
of Homan & Buchanan, with offices at 40 West 
State Street, Trenton, New Jersey. 

Dorothy Blake is spending the month of 
March in Bermuda. 

Laura Kennedy is head of the Spanish 
department in the High School in Portchester, 
N. Y. 

Helen Richter Elser (Mrs. Maximilian Elser, 
Jr.) has a son born February 17. 



86 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[April 



Frances Livingston has been spending the 
winter in Pasadena. 

Alice Patterson Bensinger is living at 30 
West Ashmead Place South, Germantown, Pa. 

Alice Ames Crothers' address is 10 Avon 
Street, Cambridge, Mass. 

1914 

Class editor, Miss Ida Pritchett, School of 
Hygiene and Public Health, Johns Hopkins 
University, Baltimore, Md. 

Isabel Benedict is working for the Institute 
of International Education in New York City 
this winter. 

Katharine Williams Hodgdon (Mrs. W. C. 
Hodgdon) is chairman for the Endowment 
campaign in Maine, New Hampshire and Ver- 
mont. 

Elizabeth Ayer is Endowment chairman for 
Boston. 

Alice Miller Chester (Mrs. William Chester) 
is chairman for Milwaukee. 

Mary Christine Smith is secretary of the 
Philadelphia Endowment Committee. 

Cleos Rockwell is assistant to the Y. W. C. A. 
Industrial Secretary in Fort Wayne, Ind. 

Wynanda K. Bulkley, the two-year-old 
daughter of Wynanda Boardman (Mrs. Dun- 
can Bulkley), died suddenly on February 29, at 
Rye, New York. 

Helen Shaw Crosby (Mrs. W. A. Crosby) 
has a daughter, Pennell, born on January 1. 

Mary L. Coolidge has been made assistant 
to the works manager, Lewis Manufacturing 
Company, Walpole, Mass. 

Elizabeth Lord is a psychologist for the 
Juvenile Court in Chicago. 

Marjorie Childs is home service secretary of 
the Norristown (Pa.) branch of the American 
Red Cross. 

1915 

Class editor, Katharine W. McCollin, 2213 
St. James Place, Philadelphia, Penna. 

Florence Abernethy is assistant to the 
Philadelphia manager of the Electric Products 
Company. 

As a representative of a Jewish welfare 
Association, Susan Brandeis, who is studying 
law in New York, recently interceded in the 
case of a young man found guilty of robbing 
the mails in Brooklyn. When Miss Brandeis 
pleaded that it was the boy's first offense, the 
judge imposed on him a sentence of twelve 
days, which he had already served while wait- 
ing for trial. 



Miriam Rohrer has just left for a six months' 
trip to China with her father. 

Isabel Smith is teaching sight singing at the 
Haverford Friends' School. 

Cleora Sutch is head of the History Depart- 
ment in the High School at Scarsdale, N. Y. 

Marguerite Jones is publicity representative 
for the New York district for the Endowment. 

Emily Noyes has announced her engage- 
ment to Clinton Knight, of Providence, R. I. 

Hazel Barnett was married to Mr. John 
Russell Blackburn, November 6, at Bedford, Pa. 

Eugenia Blount, was married in December 
to Dr. Marye Dabney, of Birmingham, Ala., 
where she is living at 1912 South Thirteenth 
street. 

Mary Monroe Harlan was married to Dr. 
Charles Bagley, Jr., December 10, at Bel Air, 
Maryland. 

Ethel Robinson Hyde (Mrs. L. B. Hyde) has 
a daughter, born in November. 

Mildred Jacobs, was married to Halton Al- 
berti Coward on February 14, in Philadelphia. 

Eleanor Dougherty has announced her 
engagement to Major Francois Trives of New 
York. Major Trives served in France through- 
out the war, and is an officer of the Legion 
of Honor. He also has the American D. S. C. 
and other decorations. 

Lucile Davidson is assistant editor of McCall's 
Magazine. 

Marguerite Darkow has returned to Phila- 
delphia. She is doing tutoring at the Irwin 
School and at the Shipley School. 

Mary Morgan is Woman's page editor on 

The Philadelphia Record. ./ -„ 

i" * f\ 
1916 

Class editor, Mrs. Webb I. Vorys, 118 Miami 
Avenue, Columbus, Ohio. 

Emile Strauss has begun work in the New 
York Children's Court for the Jewish Big Sisters. 

Mary Lee Hickman Blakely (Mrs. Charles 
Blakely) is organizer for Maryland, District of 
Columbia, Virginia and West Virginia for the 
Endowment. 

E. Buckner Kirk is publicity chairman for 
Maryland. 

Catharine Godley is organizing chairman of 
Ohio for the Endowment. 

Elizabeth Holliday Hitz (Mrs. B. D. Hitz) 
is Endowment chairman for Indianapolis. 

Adeline Werner Vorys (Mrs. Webb I. Vorys) 
has a son born January 12. 

Larie Mae Klein was married on December 
30 to Benjamin Boas of New York. 



1920] 



News from the Classes 



87 



Mr. John R. Holmes, father of Helen Holmes 
and Harriet Holmes, '20, died at his home in 
Cincinnati on January 5, after a short illness. 

Dorothy Packard has announced her engage- 
ment to F. Farrington Holt, of Detroit. 

Helen B. Holmes, has announced her engage- 
ment to Dr. Ralph G. Carothers, of Cincinnati. 

Caroline Crowell is assistant chemist, Corn- 
ing Glass Works, Corning, N. Y. 

Class editor, Miss Constance Hall, 1319 Park 
Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

Anne Davis is doing organic chemistry in the 
Synthetic Chemical Department of the East- 
man Kodak Company, Rochester, N. Y. 

Rachael Taylor is engaged to Brewster Leigh 
of Rochester, N. Y. 

Use Knauth Dunbar since leaving college in 
1915 has married Henry F. Dunbar, a high 
school science teacher. She now has two 
sons, Jimmie and Ralph, is studying music and 
helping her husband collect an herbarium of 
the local flora. She has sung in concert and 
church recitals quite often. 

Gertrude Malone is doing stenographic work 
with W. R. Grace & Co. N. Y. 

Martha Willett is captain of troop of Girl 
Scouts. 

Janet Grace is assistant to the Curator of 
Prints in the Metropolitan Museum of Art, 
New York City. 

Elizabeth Granger was married in January 
to Charles E. Brown, Jr., of Lake Forest, 111. 

Margaret Hoff Zimmermann is taking courses 
in English at the James Millikin University in 
Decatur, 111. Her husband is Associate Pro- 
fessor of Commerce at the same University. 

Mildred Willard is director of Research and 
Testing for Strawbridge & Clothier, Philadel- 
phia, Penna. 

Louisa Brown is working for the J. Walla 
Thompson Co. as secretary to one of the group 
heads of the Men's Copy Department. 

Elizabeth Wright is now a third year Medical 
student in the College of Physicians and Sur- 
geons, Columbia. 

Mary Glenn is doing private tutoring and is 
active as chairman of the Endowment Cam- 
paign in the Johnstown district. 

Dorothy Shipley is studying for an M.A. in 
Comparative Literature at Columbia. 

Sylvia Jellifle is private secretary to her 
father, Dr. Smith Ely Jellifle, of the Journal 
of Nervous and Mental Diseases. 



Alfreda Humphrey Moore has a son, David 
Benton, born January, 1920. 

Evelyn Randall is doing social work in the 
Social Service Department of the Johns Hopkins 
Hospital. 

Caroline Stevens is a student at the Harvard 
Technology School of Public Health. 

Caroline Shaw is a stenographer in Cassatt 
& Co., brokers, Philadelphia. 

Lucy Harris has announced her engagement 
to Cecil A. Clarke, 1st Lieut., 1st Engineers. 

Alice Beard wood is teaching in Southfield 
Point School, Stamford, Conn. 

Thalia Smith Dole (Mrs. Harold Dole) has a 
daughter, Diana, born last November. 

Doris Bird has announced her engagement 
to Nivin Aitken, Jr., of Philadelphia. Miss 
Bird is instructor of English at Drexel Institute. 

Phoebe Curry has announced her engage- 
ment to H. Davies, of Johnstown, Pa. 

Mary Bartow Andrews (Mrs. William Pitt 
Mason) has a daughter, Mary Pitt, born 
January 14. 

Monica O'Shea is Editor of the women's 
editorial department in the Walter Thompson 
National Advertising Company of New York 
City. 

Isabella Diamond is working in the additional 
pay section, zone finance, Washington, D. C. 

1918 

Class editor, Miss Margaret C. Timpson, 
Hotel Devon, 70 West 55th Street, New York 
City. 

Sydney Belville is teaching Latin at the New 
Hope School, New Hope, Pa. 

Ruth Cheney Streeter (Mrs. Thomas Streeter) 
is a district captain for the New York Endow- 
ment Fund. 

Katharine Dufourcq is working in the Mac- 
Millan Publishing Company in New York. 

Cornelia Fiske will be married to Harold B. 
Willis, of Boston, in the spring. 

Annette Gest is working for an A. M. degree 
in Romance Languages at the University of 
Pennsylvania. Her courses are Spanish, Por- 
tuguese and English. 

Katharine Holliday Daniels (Mrs. Joseph 
Daniels) is studying for an A.M. degree in 
Indianapolis. She is also secretary of the 
Indianapolis Endowment Committee. 

Mary Safford Munford managed a ball and 
fashion show to raise money for a Bryn Mawr 
scholarship in Richmond, Va. 



88 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[April 



Elizabeth Pershing is taking courses in fruit 
growing at Cornell. 

Katharine Holliday Daniels (Mrs. Joseph 
Daniels), is secretary of Indiana and Indian- 
apolis for the Endowment. 

Elsbeth Merck, ex-'18, has announced her 
engagement to Snowden Henry, of Phila- 
delphia. Mr. Henry was a member of the 
Princeton class of 1920, but left college in 1917 
to enter the army. He served in France with 
the 35th Engineers, and was one of the body- 
guard of the Queen of Belgium on her visit to 
Bryn Mawr. 

Mr. William Minard Richardson, father of 
Leslie Richardson died at his home in Cam- 
bridge, Mass., on January 9. 

Teresa Howell was married on Saturday, 
January 31, to Dr. Edward Olson Hulburt at 
Baltimore, Md. 

Frances Richmond is studying at Union 
College. Schenectady. 

Mary Cordingley is traveling in California 
this winter. 

Therese Born is a Fellow in English at Bryn 
Mawr for 1919-1920, having received her M.A. 
degree last spring. 

Frances Buffum is a student nurse at the 
Post-Graduate Hospital, New York. 

Consuelo Eastwick, ex-' 18 (Mrs. C. H. 
Eastwick), who married Sheldon F. Douglas of 
Minneapolis in 1917, is now in Switzerland 
studying singing for the operatic stage. She 
expects to stay abroad four or five years. 

Henrietta Huff is employed in the Time 
Department, of the Lycoming Foundry and 
Machine Company, Williamsport, Pa. 

Gertrude Reymershoffer is a second year 
medical student at the University of Texas 
Medical School. 

Mary Rupert has entered the School of 
Journalism at Columbia University. 



1919 

Class editor, Mary E. Tyler, 165 Lake Avenue, 
Greenwich, Conn. 

Jane Hall was married on Christmas Day to 
Lawrence Muller Hunter in St. Mark's church, 
New York City. Mr. Hunter saw service in 
France with the 27th Division. 

Vera Morgan has announced her engagement 
to Thomas Thacher, of Yarmouth Port, Mass. 
Mr. Thacher is a Harvard graduate and was 
with the infantry for eighteen months in France. 

Anna R. Dubach, and Frederica Howell, 
edited the alumnae issue of The College News 
which appeared on January 30. 

Rosalind Gatling Hawn (Mrs. Gavin Hawn), 
ex-'19, has a son, Richard Gatling Hawn, born 
in November. 

Frances Branson Keller (Mrs. Daniel Keller) 
is vice chairman for Philadelphia and vicinity 
for the Endowment. 

Frederica Howell has taken a position in the 
publicity department of the D. Appleton 
publishing house in New York. 

Dorothea Walton Price (Mrs. Edmund Price) 
is doing case work for the Charity Organization 
Society in New York. 

Rebecca Reinhardt has been teaching arith- 
metic in the lower grades in the Misses Hebb's 
School in Wilmington. 

Kathleen Outerbridge has returned to college 
to finish her work for an A,B. degree. 

Helen Tappan is departmental secretary in 
the University Chemical Laboratory of Johns 
Hopkins. 

Frances Fuller is studying at the Art Stu- 
dents' League in New York 

Mildred Peacock will be married to Mr. 
William Herther on April 14 in Chicago. 

The wedding of Marjorie Martin and Jerome 
Johnson is being planned for May. After the 
wedding they expect to live in Canada. 

Elizabeth Cams has been working in the 
Open Court Publishing Company in Chicago. 



1920] 



Brvn Mawr Authors and Their Books 



89 



BRYN MAWR AUTHORS AND THEIR BOOKS 



Paris Vistas. By Helen Davenport Gibbons. 

The Century Company, New York. 

To those of us who have followed with 
friendly interest Mrs. Gibbons' literary career 
one of the most striking qualities of this her 
latest book is its development in restraint. 
Interesting as was the Red Rugs of Tarsus one 
had a little the feeling that she was telling us 
everything she knew. But in Paris Vistas 
there is a certain reserve that adds much to its 
strength, and because of this the power of sug- 
gestion, that subtlest weapon of literature, has 
chance for play. Possibly we see the effect 
merely of maturity given to reserve; whatever 
it is we feel that Mrs. Gibbons has gone forward 
in Paris Vistas. 

But if she has gained in dignity and reserve 
it is not at the sacrifice of a quality that makes 
much for the attractiveness of her writing, her 
delightful enthusiasm. With that she sweeps 
the reader unresisting into her own enjoyment. 
Of course Paris to its lovers is a kind of Phile- 
mon's pitcher of delights, but if Paris be the 
setting it is not inevitably the reason for her 
pleasure, for example that scene when 
"Herbert" comes to call upon her day at home. 
One laughs with misty eyes at any people so 
adorably young and foolish. But it is this very 
joy of living that enables her to translate for 
us so well the spell of Paris, a spontaneous 
gaiety that naturally responds to the same 
French spirit. 

Unfortunately the charm of what Mrs. 
Gibbons has to say is sometimes spoiled by the 
way in which she says it, and the pity of it is 
that there is so much good writing in the book 
one is convinced that with the least effort she 
need not have been guilty of these faults. She 
does not use "newspaper" English, she does 
worse, she uses "Saturday Evening Post" Eng- 
lish; "kid," that vulgar little diminutive, so 
often for "child," "not the type out for booze," 
"they felt like D'Annunzio's lovers talked," — 
shades of general English! — and worst crimes of 
all, since both the construction and the expres- 
sion are at fault, "some kind of a wop." It 
really seems to me a serious thing, this deliberate 
playing down to the common level of which so 
many modern writers are guilty. It is quite 
unnecessary since a simple yet beautiful Eng- 
lish can be found in some of the "best sellers," 
if that is all we seek to be. Perhaps the most 



famous woman essayist of today once said to 
the mother of a Bryn Mawr undergraduate: 

"You do not know how I envy your daughter. 
If I could have had her training in English it 
would have saved me years of bitter work." 
For ignorance, they say, there is excuse, for 
forgetting, none. Since then we have had the 
chance to learn, let us do our little best to write 
correctly, not solemnly and pedantically, 
heaven forbid! but with simplicity and clearness, 
and who knows but we may achieve beauty 
as well. 

Mrs. Gibbons may sometimes express herself 
carelessly, certainly what she has to say never 
lacks interest. And there are two reasons for 
this, her ability to interpret the magic of Paris, 
and her cleverness in choosing characteristic 
incidents. When speaking of Paris as the 
world's spider-web she tells us — "The spider 
that lures is liberty to work out one's ideas in 
one's own way in a friendly country," she has 
packed into that one brief sentence the essence 
of the charm of Paris, above all to us Ameri- 
cans who live in a land where everyone is 
emphatically his brother's keeper. When she 
pictures in Repos Hebdomodaire the naturalness 
of French life, or when describing the foires 
she tells us that: 

"You do not care a bit if your cook sees you 
wildly pushing a fake bicycle," and in another 
place that "to be out of doors day and night 
is a natural instinct from the cradle to the 
grave," she has revealed further the infinite 
witchery of that enchanting city. 

To one who is an enthusiast over that much 
maligned Eiffel Tower, who has seen it, all 
golden in the early sunshine, rising like fairy 
lace work out of rosy September mists, who 
night after night just at 11.30 has heard it 
whisper the time to all the ships at sea, it is a 
delight to find Mrs. Gibbons' sympathetic 
mention of it, "the ear, the eye, the voice of 
Paris." All of us who have been tenants in 
France will appreciate her account of a French 
inventory. One tenant at least still sees her 
Breton "proprietaries" holding up the blankets 
to the light to see how much thinner they had 
grown after three months' wear, while w ith 
stubby brown fingers they pointed out 
unerringly every spot upon the rugs or paper, 
every chip or crack that marred the china. 
It was a bibulous hotel chambermaid describing 



90 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[April 






with vividness and beauty an autumn sunset 
at Versailles who revealed to the critic that 
"Emilie's" monologue is typical of the common 
people, their keenness, their appreciation, and 
their wit. And those Paris vistas! It is as if 
the French with a great sweep of the arm had 
brushed away all that might impede the full 
beauty of their buildings and monuments. We 
Americans sometimes accuse the French of 
niggardliness, they can give us lessons in gen- 
erosity here. Mrs. Gibbons in her very title 
has proved her feeling for the characteristic. 
In speaking of the war she is an equally able 
interpreter. It was a pleasure to see how she 
emphasises the normality of life even under 
extraordinary conditions. That is a truth one 
is not apt to grasp until one has lived through 
some unusual experiences. Gothas may raid 
and Berthas drop shells about a defenseless 
city, but the marketing has to be done and 
summer clothes have to be bought. One goes 
through the same daily round, it is the atmos- 
phere which saturates and colors that succession 
of petty duties which is quite different. One 
exchanges for the easy security of normal life 
the mood of constant suspense, of never know- 
ing what may happen next. When Mrs. 
Gibbons tells us of the little hardships from 
which those of the "arriere" suffered, again she 
has struck the right note. Tragedies came with 
appalling frequency, yet even then they were 
not our daily food. What was wearing, what 
seemed at times almost unendurable, and what 
in addition to the suspense wore French nerves 
to the ragged edge was the constant difficulty 
of life, the petty privations such as doing without 



butter, cream, and sugar, the continual battle 
to get anything done. In one point however 
Mrs. Gibbons seems to lack discernment; she 
says: — "It is strange how you go on living in 
the midst of war, seeing others suffer, sharing 
their grief, and never thinking that the death 
that is stalking about will enter your own 
family circle until the telegram comes." I never 
knew anyone with a near relative at the Front 
who was not secretly wondering when it would 
be her turn. If a telegram arrived one mur- 
mured involuntarily, "It has come," and to 
open it was a question of real courage. To 
change abruptly from grave to gay, if you want 
to know how Americans in Paris felt about the 
coming of the Red Cross, read Mrs. Gibbons' 
account of the "Charity Trust." 

I am glad she has given us that beautiful 
proclamation of the armistice. One reads it 
breathless. It is a pity she could not end there, 
the Peace Conference is so tragic an anti- 
climax. As one reads Mrs. Gibbons' pages, 
as one hears or reads futile senatorial discussion, 
that line to which she alludes echoes in the 
mind: 

"If ye break faith with us who die." 
Perhaps to provide us with the proverbial 
happy ending she closes her delightful book 
with a vivid picture of the Quatorze of Victory. 
Louise Cruice Sturdevant, '06. 

Beulah Brylanski Amram (Mrs. David 
Werner Amram), '02, has an article entitled 
"Heine and the Germans," in the North Amer- 
ican Review of January, 1920. 



The Shipley School 

Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania 



Preparatory to Bryn Mawr College 



Alice G. Howland, 
Eleanor 0. Brownell, 

Principals. 

DAKEWOOD H&LL 

\LAKE\^OD, N. J. 

A College Preparatory School for 

Girls. Carefully planned 

General. Courses 




Principal 

B. Corive 

Bryn Mawr„,Col!ege 



fe: 



THE MISSES KIRICS 

College Preparatory School 

Bryn Mawr Ave. and Old Lancaster Road 

Bryn Mawr, Pa. 
Number of boarders limited. Com- 
bines advantages of school life with 
private instruction. Individual schedule 
arranged for each pupil. 

All teachers thoroughly familiar with 
college preparatory work. Frequent 
examinations by Bryn Mawr College 
professors. 
Gymnastics and outdoor games. 



The Baldwin School 



A Country School 
for Girls 



Bryn Mawr 
Pennsylvania 
Ten miles from Philadelphia. Fire- 
proof Stone Building. Outdoor Gym- 
nasium. Winter Basketball Field 
Outdoor and Indoor Classrooms 
Extensi-ue Grounds. 
Preparation for Bryn Mawr, Mount Holyoke, 
Smith, Vassar and WeHesley colleges. Also 
a strong general course. Within 17 years 291 
students from this school have entered Bryn 
Mawr College. Abundant outdoor life — 
hockey, basketball, tennis, riding. 

Elizabeth Forrest Johnson, A.B., 
Head of the School 



MISS MADEIRA'S SCHOOL 
1330 19th St.. N. W. Washington, D. C. 



A Resident and Day School 
for Girls 

LUCY MADEIRA WING, A.B. 

MRS. DAVID LAFOREST WING 
Head Mistress 



MISS BEARD'S SCHOOL 

Situated in one of the most healthful and 
beautiful of the New York suburbs, 
Orange, N. J. This school offers the 
advantages of country and city alike. 

College Preparatory, Special, and Grad- 
uate Courses. Gymnasium, Music 
and Art Studios. Domestic Arts. 

Write for Illustrated Catalogue 

Address 

Miss Lucie C. Beard Orange, N. J. 



The Ethel Walker School, Inc. 

SIMSBURY, CONNECTICUT 

Head of School 

ETHEL M. WALKER 

A.M. BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 



Kindly mention the guARTK&LY 
x 



St. Timothy's School for Girls 



CATONSV1LLE. MD. 



Re-opened September, 1919 



Closes June. 1920 



Prepares for College, preferably 
Bryn Mawr 



MISS WRIGHT'S SCHOOL 
Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Prepares for Bryn Mawr and 
College Board Examinations 



Rosemary Hall 

Founded 1890 

No elective courses 

Prepares for college 

Preferably Bryn Mawr 

Caroline Ruutz-Rees, Ph.D. ) u ,»«. 
Mary E. Lowndes, Litt.D. } Head Mlstre8se « 

GREENWICH. CONNECTICUT 



THE AGNES IRWIN SCHOOL 

2011 DE LANCEY PLACE 
PHILADELPHIA 

Prepares for Bryn Mawr, Smith, 
Vassar and Wellesley 
Colleges 

JOSEPHINE A. NATT. Head-Mistress 
BERTHA M. LAWS. Secretary-Treasurer 



HIGHLAND HALL 

SCHOOL FOR GIRLS 

Located in HoIHdaysburg in the most 

beautiful section of the Allegheny 

Mountains five miles from Altoona 

on the Main Line of Pennsylvania 

Railroad. 

College Preparatory, General and 

Post-graduate Courses. 

MISS ELLEN C. KEATES, A.B., Principal, 
HoIHdaysburg, Pennsylvania. 



Rogers Hall School for girls 



FACES ROGERS FORT HILL PARK 



38 MINUTES FROM BOSTON 



"PHOROUGH preparation for Bryn Mawr and other colleges. Rogers 

Hall is now represented in Bryn Mawr, Radcliffe, Smith, Vassar, 

Wellesley, University of Wisconsin, and University of Chicago. Large 

grounds for outdoor sports. Experienced instructors in charge of all 

athletics. New Gymnasium and Swimming Pool. For catalogue, address 

MISS OLIVE SEWALL PARSONS, Principal LOWELL, MASS. 



Kindly mention the Quarterly 
it 



GOOD FRIDAY 

A PASSION PLAY OF NOW 
By 

TRACY D. MYGATT, '08 

"it is powerful indeed, and profoundly 
moving." 

Oswald Garrison Villard 

Editor The Nation 

Published, 23 Bank Street, New York 
Price, 50 Cents 



Choice Teaching Positions 

Bryn Mawr Graduates may have their 
choice of the best teaching positions near 
Bryn Mawr or in any state — either in pri- 
vate or public schools by writing or visit- 
ing the National Teachers Agency, 1530 
Chestnut Street, 327 Perry Building, Phila- 
delphia, Pa. 

No fee unless appointed. Hundreds of appoint- 
ments waiting. Telephone Spruce 2723, .Phila- 
delphia. 



Ballard School Secretarial Class 

College women who aim for leadership in the business world 
find our Secretarial Course a solid foundation for future 
success. Send for bulletin. 

Jeannette Hamill, Director. 

Ballard School, Central Branch Y. W. C. A. 

610 Lexington Avenue, New York City 



^^^^fj.^ % 







^^^H^Uffl^ 



2S ?«ag«? iw ., ^ 

SKU;:.:r:. «SK 







A casting for one of the 
huge water-wheel driven 
generators installed in the 
Mississippi River Power 
Company's plant at Keo- 
kuk. This installation will 
ultimately consist of thirty 
of these machines, giving 
a total capacity of 216,000 
kilowatts (300,000 horse- 
power;. It is the largest 
hydro - electric develop- 
ment in the world. The 
General Electric Company 
builds generators for wa- 
ter-wheel drive in sizes 
ranging from 37% to 32,500 
kilowatts and the aggre- 
gate capacity of G-E units 
now in successful opera- 
tion is in excess of four 
million horse-power. 



Mississippi SHverltewer 




Utilizing Nature's Power 

ELECTRICAL energy generated by water power 
has grown to be one of our greatest natural 
resources — and we have only begun to reach its 
possibilities. It mines and refines our ores, turns the 
wheels of industry, drives our street cars and lights 
our cities and towns. The power obtained from 
Nature saves many million tons of coal every year. 

At first th« field of its utilization was limited by the distance elec- 
tricity could be transported. But soon research and engineering 
skill pointed the way to larger and better electrical apparatus 
necessary for high-voltage transmission. Then ingenious devices 
were invented to insure protection against lightning, short-circuits, 
etc., which cause damage and interrupt the service. And now all 
over the country a network of wires begins to appear, carrying 
the magic power, 

The General Electric Company, with its many years' experience, 
has played a great part in hydro-electric development. By suc- 
cessfully co-ordinating the inventive genius of the company and 
its engineering and manufacturing abilities, it has accomplished 
some of the greatest achievements in the production and applica- 
tion of electrical energy. 

The old mill wheel of yesterday has gone. Today the forces of 
immense volumes of water are harnessed and sent miles away to 
supply the needs of industry and business and the comforts of 

the home. 




General Office 
Schenectady; NY. 




Sales Offices in 
all large cities 



95-239C 






RYN MAWR 
ALUMNAE 



^QUARTERLY 




f Vo 



Vol. XIV JULY, 1920 



No. 3 




•"^muRM***"'* 



Published by the Alumnae Association 

of 
Bryn Mawr College 



THE BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE 
QUARTERLY 



Editor-in-Chief 
Isabel Foster, '15 
Bryn Mawr, Perm. 

TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Endowment Victory Is Climax of Commencement 91 

An Appreciation of Endowment Leader 95 

Dr. Shorey Gives Commencement Address 96 

Dr. Merrill Preaches Baccalaureate Sermon 100 

Alumnae Supper 100 

College Breakfast 102 

Alumnae Day 104 

Class Reunions 104 

Special Meeting of Alumnae Association Called 107 

Report of Conference of Alumni and Alumnae Secretaries 108 

Report of A. C. A. Council 110 

Letters to the Editor 

A New Field 110 

Alumna Pleads for Citizenship Ill 

News from the Campus 

Changes in the Faculty Ill 

Foreign Scholars 112 

Girls' Club 112 

New Electives 112 

Where Do You Stand 112 

General Literature Test 114 

Fewer Alumnae Teach 114 

New Publications 114 

Present Papers 114 

News from the Clubs 

Chicago 114 

Northern California 114 

New York City 115 

Pittsburgh 115 

St. Louis 115 

Washington 115 

News from the Classes 116 

Contributions to the Quarterly, books for review, and subscriptions should be sent to 
the Editor-in-Chief, Isabel Foster, Taylor Hall, Bryn Mawr, Penn. Cheques should be 
drawn payable to Bertha S. Ehlers, Taylor Hall, Bryn Mawr, Penn. The Quarterly 
is published in January, April, July and November of each year. The price of subscription 
is one dollar a year, and single copies are sold for twenty-five cents each. Any failure 
to receive numbers of the Quarterly should be reported promptly to the Editor. Changes 
of address should be reported to the Editor not later than the first day of each month 
of issue. News items may be sent to the Editors. 

Copyright, 1920, by the Alumnae Association of Bryn Mawr College 



Notice 



n^HE cooperation and support of 
the Alumnae is invited for the 
revised form of the Bryn Mawr 
undergraduate paper which is to be 
published next year. A Quarterly, 
somewhat larger than the present 
"Review" is to be issued containing 
purely literary work, and a bimonth- 
ly funny sheet is to be printed for 
college distribution only. It is 
hoped that each number of the 
Quarterly may contain at least four 
pages of Alumnae work. 

If we are to have a successful 
magazine we must have Alumnae 
support. We appeal especially to 
the Boards of the "Phillistine," the 
"Tip" and the "Lantern." 

Send contributions to 
Helen D. Hill, Editor-in-Chief, 
31 Radnor Hall. 

Send all subscriptions ($2.00 per 
year) to 

Mary McClennen, 
Business Manager, 
22 Radnor Hall. 






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THE BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE 
QUARTERLY 



VOLUME XIV 



JULY, 1920 



No. 3 



COMMENCEMENT FESTIVITIES REACH CLIMAX 
IN ENDOWMENT VICTORY 



The announcement that two million dollars 
for endowment had been raised in the last seven 
months was the climax of the thirty-fifth con- 
ferring of degrees at Bryn Mawr College. 

Caroline McCormick Slade, '96, in the name 
of the National Endowment Committee, 
presented the endowment to the college with 
an additional gift of $100,000 from John D. 
Rockefeller, Jr., to found a Grace Dodge Chair 
of Industrial Supervision and Employment 
in the Carola Woerishoffer Department. 

Acting President Helen Taft accepted the 
gift in the name of the college and Dr. Charlotte 
A. Scott, professor of mathematics, thanked the 
alumnae in the name of the faculty. 

Five degrees of Doctor of Philosophy were 
conferred on the following: 

Louise Elizabeth Whetenhall Adams of 
Brooklyn, N. Y. A.B., Barnard College, 1914, 
and A.M., Columbia University, 1915. Grad- 
uate Student Columbia University, 1914-15; 
Graduate Scholar in Greek, Bryn Mawr College, 
1915-16; Affiliated Fellow in the American 
Academy in Rome and Special European Fellow 
of Bryn Mawr College, 1916-17; Fellow in 
Latin, Bryn Mawr College, 1917-18; Instructor 
in Latin, Smith College, 1918-20. Subjects: 
Latin, Classical Archaeology, and Greek. 
Dissertation: A Study of the Commerce of 
Latium from the Early Iron Age through the 
Sixth Century, B. C. 

Beatrice Allard of Massachusetts. A.B., 
Mount Holyoke College, 1915. Graduate 
Scholar in Semitic Languages and Biblical 
Literature, Bryn Mawr College, 1915-16; 
Fellow in Semitic Languages, 1916-18; Fellow 
by Courtesy and Graduate Scholar in Semitic 



Languages and Holder of the Mary E. Woolley 
Fellowship of Mount Holyoke College, 1918-19; 
Holder of the Alice Freeman Palmer Fellowship 
of Wellesley College and Research Worker in 
Harvard University Library, 1919-20. Sub- 
jects: Assyriology, Assyrian, Hebrew. Disser- 
tation: A Contribution to the Study of the 
Moral Practices of Certain Social Groups in 
Ancient Mesopotamia. 

Agnes Mary Hadden Byrnes of Illinois. 
A.B., Northwestern University, 1915; A.M., 
Columbia University, 1916; Susan B. Anthony 
Memorial Scholar, Bryn Mawr College, 1916-17; 
Carola Woerishoffer Fellow in Social Economy 
and Social Research, 1917-18; Statistical 
Tabular Critic, Bureau of Research, War 
Trade Board, 1918-19; Instructor in Social 
Investigation, Margaret Morrison Division of 
the Carnegie Institute of Technology 1919-20. 
Subjects: Social Economy, Politics, and Phil- 
osophy. Dissertation: Industrial Home Work 
in the State of Pennsylvania. 

Gwendolyn Hughes of Nebraska. A.B., 
University of Nebraska, 1916, and A.M., 1917. 
Scholar in Sociology, University of Nebraska, 
1916-17, and Fellow, 1917-18. Assistant, 
Child Welfare Department, Lincoln Public 
Schools, 1917-18; Susan B. Anthony Scholar in 
Social Economy and Social Research, Bryn 
Mawr College, 1918-19; Carola Woerishoffer 
Fellow in Social Economy and Social Research, 
Bryn Mawr College, 1919-20. Subjects: Social 
Economy, Social Theory, and Politics. Disser- 
tation: Causation Study of Mothers in Industry. 

Bird Margaret Turner of West Virginia. 
A.B., West Virginia University, 1915, and A.M., 
1916. Student Assistant in Mathematics, Uni- 



Note — Latest figures and news of 'the endowment were published in the final edition of "Strike Oil" 
mailed to all Quarterly subscribers the first of the month by the national publicity committee. A final 
report will be printed in the November Quarterly. 

91 



92 



The Bryn Mawr Alumnae Quarterly 



[July 



versity of West Virginia, 1913-15; Graduate 
Student in Mathematics, University of West 
Virginia, 1914-15, and Assistant in the Summer 
School, 1915 and 1916; Principal of the High 
School, Moundsville, W. Va., 1915-16; Graduate 
Scholar in Mathematics, Bryn Mawr College, 
1916-17; Assistant Director of the Phebe Anna 
Thorne Model School, 1917-18; President's 
European Fellow, and Reader in Mathematics, 
Bryn Mawr College, 1918-19; Fellow in Mathe- 
matics, 1919-20. Subjects: Mathematics and 
Education. Dissertation: Plane Cubics with a 
Given Quadrangle of Inflexions. 

Nine Masters of Arts were conferred as follows: 

Cecilia Irene Baechle of Philadelphia. 
A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1913. 

Eleanor Lansing Dulles of Auburn, N. Y. 
A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1917. 

Margaret Gilman of Wellesley, Mass. 
A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1919. 

Margaret Hudson of Philadelphia. A.B., 
Bryn Mawr College, 1909. 

Elizabeth Pinney Hunt of Haverford, Pa. 
A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1912. 

Ernestine Emma Mercer of Philadelphia. 
A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1919. 

Alice Harrison Newlin of Whitford, Pa. 
A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1918. 

Helen Elizabeth Spalding of Detroit, 
Mich. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1919. 

Ruth Jackson Woodruff of Scranton, Pa. 
A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1919. 

Those receiving A.B.'s were: 

In the group of French and Modern History: 
Marjorie Wistar Canby of Philadelphia; 
Martha Jane Lindsey of Tennessee; Dorothy 
Wonderly Smith of Michigan, cum laude; 
Edith Stevens of Massachusetts. 

In the group of Spanish and German: Agnes 
Jeannette Moebius of New Jersey. 

In the group of Spanish and Modern History: 
Marguerite Elizabeth Eilers of New York. 

In the group of Modern History and Economics 
and Politics: Zella Detmold Boynton of 
New York City, cum laude; Elizabeth Brace 
of New York City; Anne Coolidge of Massa- 
chusetts; Mary Scattergood Hoag of Penn- 
sylvania; Helen Elizabeth Huntting of 
Minnesota (work for this degree completed in 
February) ; Margaret McAllister Jane way of 
New York City (work for this degree completed 
in February); Cornelia Keeble of Tennessee; 
Kathleen Louise Norton Outerbridge of 
New York City, cum laude; Dorothy Alice 
Peters of Ohio (work for this degree completed 



in February); Mary Gertrude Porritt of 
Connecticut; Alice Quan Rood of Illinois; 
Mary Scott of Philadelphia; Katharine 
Douglas Tyler of Baltimore; Isabel Mary 
Skolfield Whittler of Maine; Helen Marie 
Mohr Zinsser of New York City. 

In the group of Economics and Politics and 
Psychology: Madelaine Ray Brown of Rhode 
Island; Margaret Elisabeth Butler of 
Minnesota; Jean Gilpin Justice of Penn- 
sylvania; Eleanor Marquand of New Jersey, 
magna cum laude (work for this degree com- 
pleted in February). 

In the group of Philosophy and Psychology: 
Julia Newton Cochran of Virginia, cum 
laude; Emily Florence Matz of Illinois (work 
for this degree completed in February). 

In the group of Psychology and Physics: 
Virginia Park of Kansas. 

In the group of Psychology and Biology: 
Miriam Burkloe Brown of Baltimore, cum 
laude. 

In the group of Mathematics and Physics: 
Hilda Ferris of Philadelphia; Mary Hardy 
of Maryland; Monica Healea of Ohio; Doro- 
thy DeGroff Jenkins of Philadelphia, cum 
laude; Miriam Eliot O'Brien of Massa- 
chusetts, cum laude; Agnes Milne Rose of 
Pennsylvania; Louise Littig Sloan of Mary- 
land. 

In the group of Chemistry and Physics: Mary 
Louise Mall of Baltimore. 

In the Group of Chemistry and Biology: Mary 
Katharine Gary of Virginia. 

In the group of Greek and Latin: Hilda 
Buttenwleser of Ohio, cum laude. 

In the group of Greek and English: Margaret 
Millicent Carey of Baltimore, magna cum 
laude. 

In the group of Greek and French: Martha 
Frances Chase of Massachusetts; Margaret 
Littell of New York City. 

In the group of Greek and Philosophy